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December 6, 2016 / 6 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘operations’

Shooting, Arrests in IDF Overnight Operations

Friday, October 14th, 2016

IDF forces arrested six wanted terrorists overnight Thursday in Judea and Samaria. Five of the detainees are suspected of involvement in terror and violence, both against Israeli civilians and security forces.

One of the detainee was a Hamas operative residing in Tulkarem.

All six were taken to an interrogation facility.

Also overnight Thursday, shots were fired from a light firearm at a Border Guard vehicle in the village of Qabatiya near Jenin in Samaria. One officer was injured and was evacuated to hospital. The terrorists also shot an IED at the officers causing a second officer light injuries.

On Wednesday night IDF forces detained at least 26 Arabs from Judea, Samaria and eastern Jerusalem, out of whom 14 were released shortly afterwards and banned from entering the Temple Mount. According to the Palestinian Prisoner’s Society (PPS), 17 Arabs were detained in eastern Jerusalem, including Muhammad Shuyukhi, the twin brother of Ali Shuyukhi, who was killed on Tuesday night by IDF and police during clashes in the eastern Jerusalem mixed neighborhood of Silwan (see picture above).

David Israel

2014 Gaza War Parents Demand Investigation of Operation’s Conduct, High Losses

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Two years after Operation Protective Edge, in which 66 IDF soldiers and five civilians were killed, the bereaved families of the fallen are demanding an independent committee to examine the preparations for the war, the way it was conducted, and the lessons to be learned.

The 32 families on Sunday demanded in a letter to Prime Minister Netanyahu and Defense Minister Liberman that a state commission headed by a judge investigate the government’s decision-making process throughout the war.

In their letter, the families mentioned the fact that the Knesset Foreign and Security Committee had been asked to examine the events of the 2014 war and has yet to issue a report. One report that had been produced by the committee was shelved because of the 2015 elections. Referring to the same committee’s publicized intent to renew its investigation, the families argued it made no sense to “reconvene a committee that has already investigated the events and opted not to publish its conclusions.”

“Even if the decision to shelve the conclusions was made by a different person than the current committee head, it would be inappropriate to renew the discussion after such a long period of time, and it could appear as a lack of transparency or exterior pressures which do not belong in an investigation of this scope,” the families wrote.

On the evening of June 12, 2014, three Israeli teenagers were kidnapped and later murdered in Judea and Samaria by Hamas operatives. Their bodies were discovered on June 30. Israel retaliated with air strikes on Gaza in which 3 Arabs were killed and a dozen injured. Hamas retaliated with rockets that were fired at Israeli civilian centers wounding three people. On July 7, 80 rockets were fired from the Gaza Strip, and the Netanyahu security cabinet decided to launch a counter-terrorist operation. The IDF bombarded targets in the Gaza Strip with artillery and airstrikes, and Hamas continued to fire rockets and mortar shells into Israel. A cease-fire proposal was announced by the Egyptian government and PA Chairman Mahmoud Abbas on July 14, and the Israeli government accepted it and stopped the attacks on the morning of July 15. But Hamas rejected the ceasefire and the war was renewed. By July 16 the death toll in Gaza had reached 200.

On July 16, Hamas and Islamic Jihad offered a 10-year truce with ten conditions, including lifting of the Gaza blockade and the release of prisoners who were re-arrested after being released in the Gilad Shalit prisoner swap. Israel refused those terms. On July 17, a five-hour humanitarian ceasefire, proposed by the UN, took place. But a few hours before the ceasefire was to start, 13 armed Hamas terrorists emerging from a tunnel on the Israeli side of the Gaza border. The IDF destroyed the tunnel’s exit, ending the incursion.

After the ceasefire, the IDF launched a ground offensive on the Gaza Strip, aimed at destroying the terror tunnels crossing under the Israeli border. On July 20, the IDF entered Shuja’iyya in Gaza City and encountered heavy resistance. Thirteen IDF soldiers were killed, including two Americans serving in Israel. Seven of the IDF soldiers were killed as their armored vehicle was hit by an anti-tank rocket or an improvised explosive device, and three were killed in clashes with terrorists. Three IDF soldiers were trapped in a burning house. In the next 24 hours, three more IDF soldiers were killed in Shuja’iyya.

Shortly after the battle, twenty civilians from Shuja’iyya were shot for protesting against Hamas. Hamas said it had executed Israeli spies.

On August 3, the IDF pulled most of its ground forces out of the Gaza Strip after completing the destruction of 32 terror tunnels. On August 5 Israel announced that it had arrested Hossam Kawasmeh, suspected of having organized the killing of the three teenagers. According to court documents, Kawasmeh stated that Hamas members in Gaza financed the recruitment and arming of the killers.

JNi.Media

Israeli Security Operations Net 7 Terror Suspects

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Israeli military forces captured seven suspected terrorists Sunday night in region-wide operations throughout Judea and Samaria.

Three of the suspects were members of the Gaza-based Hamas terrorist organization.

The other four detainees were arrested for allegedly engaging in “popular terror” and attacking Israeli civilians and security forces.

All of the suspects were transferred to security personnel for interrogation.

Hana Levi Julian

IDF Forces Arrest Terror Fugitives in Judea, Samaria

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

IDF soldiers fought their way through a haze of gunfire and firebombs (Molotov cocktails) to arrest suspected terrorists overnight in Samaria.

The operation took place in the Palestinian Authority-controlled “refugee camp” of Jenin, which has long since morphed into a full-fledged town located near a number of Jewish communities.

No one was injured in the shootout. A collection of bombs, knives and ammunition was picked up in the raid – along with a known Hamas terrorist, who was arrested on the spot.

Seven other suspected PA Arab terrorists were arrested elsewhere in Samaria and Judea as well, according to military sources.

Earlier Monday evening, an Israel Police officer was wounded after being hit by a hail of rocks hurled by PA Arabs in Jerusalem.

No one was arrested at the scene, according to a report broadcast on Israel public radio.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Head of Met Council Steps Down, Apologizes for Mistakes

Monday, August 12th, 2013

William E. Rapfogel, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty (Met Council) since 1992, has been fired from his job and is under investigation for alleged financial wrongdoing, the NY Times reported.

Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, and comptroller, Thomas P. DiNapoli, are now investigating Mr. Rapfogel as part of a new anti-corruption task force.

In a statement released by his lawyer, Rapfogel apologized for unspecified mistakes.

“After 21 years at the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, I deeply regret the mistakes I have made that have led to my departure from the organization,” he said. “I apologize to our dedicated officers and board, our incredible staff and those who depend on Met Council. I let them all down.”

Rapfogel also said: “I pray that my family and friends and all who care about Met Council can find it in their heart to forgive me for my actions. I will do everything possible to make amends.”

Met Council released the following statement:

“The Board of Directors of Met Council recently became aware of specific information regarding financial irregularities and apparent misconduct in connection with the organization’s insurance policies. The Board retained outside counsel to conduct a full investigation. Based on that investigation, which is ongoing, the Board has terminated Mr. Rapfogel, effective immediately, and notified the proper authority. To date, the investigation has not revealed evidence that any current employees of Met Council engaged in any wrongdoing.

“The Board takes these matters very seriously. For over forty years, Met Council has been a respected leader as one of New York City’s largest human services agencies, providing assistance to over 100,000 New Yorkers each year in their fight against poverty. The Board is committed to ensuring Met Council’s operations are conducted with integrity and that they uphold our highest values.

“The Board has embarked upon a search to identify a new CEO and will work diligently to appoint a replacement as quickly as possible. In the meantime, there should be no disruption to Met Council’s day-to-day operations. The Board has the utmost confidence in the talent and dedication of the current executive staff, which will continue to manage the organization’s various programs that provide food, shelter and care to thousands of New Yorkers in need.”

In 2011, the Met Council paid Mr. Rapfogel $340,089 in direct compensation, plus $77,202 in “other compensation,” according to a tax document filed with the Internal Revenue Service, the Times reported.

Jewish Press Staff

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/head-of-met-council-steps-down-apologizes-for-mistakes/2013/08/12/

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