Photo Credit: Jewish Press

The practical consequence of this law is that if, for some reason unconnected with the sanctity of the animal, the animal became unfit for consumption after the sprinkling of the blood, a person who derives benefit from the animal – other than eating it – is not liable to the laws and penalties of me’ilah.

Thus for example, the meat of a korban that had already undergone the avodah of zerikah but that subsequently became unfit for consumption – either because it became tamei due to its having been allowed to remain beyond its allotted time for consumption or because it was removed from the Temple Courtyard – is not subject to the laws of me’ilah.

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Raphael Grunfeld’s book, “Ner Eyal on Seder Moed” (distributed by Mesorah) is available at OU.org and your local Jewish bookstore.

Comments to the writer are welcome at Rafegrun@aol.com.

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Raphael Grunfeld received semicha in Yoreh Yoreh from Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem of America and in Yadin Yadin from Maran Hagaon Harav Dovid Feinstein, Shlitah. A partner at the Wall Street law firm of Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP, where he specializes in cross-border mergers and acquisitions, Raphael is also the author of “Ner Eyal, a Guide to Seder Nashim, Nezikin, Kodashim, Taharot and Zerayim” (2016) and “Ner Eyal, a Guide to the Laws of Shabbat and Festivals in Seder Moed” (2001).
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