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May 22, 2015 / 4 Sivan, 5775
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Korach: Can We Influence God?


Korach

Korach
Photo Credit: Alephbeta.org

Description: In this week’s parsha video, Rabbi Fohrman points to two fascinating stories which seem to have contradictory lessons about the way we interact with God.

These stories force us to ask a theological question: what impact, if any, can we have on God? Is it possible for us to influence God?

Visit AlephBeta.  /  Rabbi David Fohrman

About the Author: Rabbi David Fohrman is the dean of Aleph Beta Academy. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University, and was a lead writer and editor for ArtScroll's Talmud translation project. Aleph Beta creates videos to help people experience Torah in way that is relevant and meaningful to them. for more videos, visit: alephbeta.org.


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7 Responses to “Korach: Can We Influence God?”

  1. Moa Sahli says:

    If u find her, hhhhhh

  2. Elyse Dorm says:

    It is possible to plead with God but is it good to do so? I don’t think so. In Moishe’s case his love for the people saved them because God’s wrath against the people was on behalf of Moishe, but when Hezekiah pleaded with God for his life instead of preparing for death and God granted him 15 more years we can see this did not end well, Hezekiah became proud and boastful and this resulted in a lot of trouble. I think we can plead with God but in the end we need to say “Your will be done”, because God will do what is best for us if we trust Him.

  3. No and why would you want to. Gds decision is final.

  4. Ita Benjamin says:

    “u’Teshuva, u’Tefila, u’Tzedaka ma’avirin et roah haGezerah” – “But repentance, and prayer and and acts of loving-kindness cause the evilness of the decree to pass.” Yes, it is possible and desirable; G-d Himself gives us the formula.

  5. Donna Lee Lassere says:

    כן בן

Comments are closed.

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/rabbi-david-fohrman/korach-can-we-influence-god/2014/06/19/

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