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September 20, 2014 / 25 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘hitchhiking’

IDF Preparing to Install Hitchhiking Lights and Cameras

Friday, June 27th, 2014

The IDF is examining and preparing to install lights and cameras at all the hitchhiking posts.

In additional crash barriers may be added, where there aren’t any yet.

The cameras should act as a deterrent against future kidnappings.

In the meantime, the IDF has added extra road patrols to watch all the hitchhiking stations.

Gov’t to Start Weekend Buses to Yeshiva, Girls’ Schools in Judea, Samaria

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has ordered financing for public shuttles to and from yeshiva and girls’ high schools in Judea and Samaria on the weekends, it was announced Tuesday.

The prime minister told his staff to allocate NIS 4 million (approx. $1.15 million) for the shuttles, which will apparently will operate on Thursday nights, Fridays, Saturday nights and Sundays.

The decision was made in order to discourage hitchhiking, which has become a way of life in Judea and Samaria in order to deal with the infrequent and inadequate public bus service in the region. Although there are numerous political and financial reasons for the sketchy bus service, the bottom line results in Jewish residents of all ages hitchhiking on unsafe roads at all hours of the day and night.

Last Thursday evening, the price for that fact cost three families their teenage sons: a terrorist organization kidnapped two 16 year olds and a 19 year old, all of whom were students at the renowned Mekor Chaim Yeshiva in Kfar Etzion. The boys were in Gush Etzion, hitchhiking home for the Sabbath when they were abducted.

EU Condemns Terrorist Kidnapping – 5 Days Later

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

The European Union finally came out Tuesday with a statement of condemnation against the terrorists who kidnapped three teenage yeshiva students – five days after the incident took place. Two 16 year old boys, one of whom is an American citizen, and a 19 year old, were abducted in Gush Etzion while hitchhiking to reach their homes last Thursday evening in order to spend time with their families for the Sabbath. Public bus service in the area — which is completely under Israeli administration and security control in accordance with the internationally-recognized Oslo Accords — is infrequent and hitchhiking is common as a result.

“We condemn in the strongest of terms the abduction of three Israeli students in the West Bank and call for their immediate release and safe return to their families,” said the statement issued by the EU.

“Such acts can only undermine international efforts to encourage a resumption of peace negotiations. We are following developments closely and remain in constant contact with our Israeli and Palestinian counterparts.”

The statement was later even than the one issued by Palestinian Authority unity government chairman Mahmoud Abbas, tepid as it was. Moreover, the abduction came barely 24 hours after an EU delegation visited Gaza to express their support for the Hamas-backed ministers who had just been sworn into office in the new PA unity government two days earlier.

Despite Terror, Life at the Gush Etzion Junction Continues As Usual

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

It is the third day since the kidnapping of the three Israeli teens by Palestinian terrorists at the Gush Etzion junction in Judea. Standing at the site where the boys were reportedly last seen, IDF soldiers and Israeli civilians, adults and schoolchildren, continue on with the day, but not without thoughts of the tragic abduction.

“We are shocked by this,” said Moriah Casspi, 30, from nearby Bat Ayin to Tazpit News Agency, as she was waiting for her bus on Sunday. “The kidnapping is always on my mind; I find myself crying all the time. I can’t even imagine what the parents are going through.”

“For us, it is a horrible situation. Our kids and families are used to walking around that area without any hesitation. Now we feel that it is not secure enough,” said the head of the Gush Etzion Regional Council, Davidi Pearl to Tazpit News Agency in an exclusive interview.

“It’s especially scary for the kids but we have to continue our life as usual with a regular routine; to go to school and to work.”

Pearl, who has been living in Gush Etzion for 44 years and is a resident of Alon Shvut, said that while the kidnapping was not surprising, the location of where it took place was unexpected. “We knew that someday this could happen but we were surprised that it happened here, it what appears to be a secure area.”

The Gush Etzion junction, also known as Tzomet HaGush in Hebrew, serves as the entry point to the Gush Etzion bloc of communities as well as the business and commercial shopping center in Judea. Located two miles south of Efrat, and a 15-minute drive to the Jerusalem neighborhood of Gilo, the site has been frequently targeted by Palestinian terrorists.

“We have to fight against this terror and we have to say that the State of Israel is here to stay,” said Davidi.

Located in the Judean Mountains, public transportation to and from Gush Etzion, where more than 70,000 Israelis live, is limited. Many residents rely on hitchhiking to get to their homes.

Alana Bandos, a Wisconsin native studying in Jerusalem for the year, told Tazpit that although she has been scared to use the Gush Etzion junction for transportation, she will not let the terrorists stop her. “My aunt and uncle live in Efrat and I visit them frequently. I don’t believe in giving in to terrorists which is part of why I’m here today, waiting to catch a bus back to Jerusalem,” she said.

Hitchhiking

Monday, June 16th, 2014

Hitchhiking, or “Trempim” as it is called in Hebrew, is a common mode of transportation for many Israelis.

The photo above is of a standard and official Trempim post in Gush Etzion. It is clean, covered, well lit, and very popular.

You’ll notice there are crash barriers in front of the Trempim post.

Arab terrorists have previously rammed their cars into Israelis waiting at the posts, so crash barriers were installed to prevent those terrorist attacks.

Unfortunately there is no end to the evil machinations Arab terrorists will come up with. You can protect yourself with crash barriers, and they’ll invent a new method to kill Jews.

The problem isn’t with the hitchhikers…

Tremping Rules of the Road

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

One of the more interesting phenomena in Israel is the hitchhiking culture, called “tremping” locally. If you’ve ever seen the mobs of Israelis waiting at bus stops near the entrance to a city, some with their index fingers pointed down (instead of thumbs up), they’re requesting that, out of the goodness of your heart, would you please stop so I can possibly catch a ride with you?

Typically, this is how it works: a driver stops at a trempiada (a local gathering place to catch a tremp), rolls down the window and calls out his destination. Then, he or she has to repeat it several times before the throng of hopefuls hears it clearly, at which point anyone not interested in the ride will repeat the location for the benefit of other trempers. Anyone who wants the ride will then jostle their way through the crowd to reach the car before it zips away. The passengers will squeeze in to the allowable maximum in the car, and the driver will then continue on to his or her destination.

So once you have a car full of strangers, what is the etiquette? Are they a captive audience? Should they sit in silence for the next 45 minutes? What about our “always reachable” society of smartphones and SMS? There are many schools of thought to exactly how both the drivers and passengers should behave. Sure I’m doing people a favor, but that doesn’t mean I have to by a tyrant. That being said, here are some rules for tremping etiquette:

  • My kids leave my back seat a shambles regularly. Give me a minute to throw it in the trunk so I don’t have to be embarrassed by it.
  • I’m not talking to you because my conversational Hebrew is lousy. Unless you say something in English, then I’m playing Jewish Geography with you.
  • Please do not smoke, fart, or otherwise stink up my car worse than it is (see “shambles”).
  • I might not share what I’m eating, because it might be the first thing I’ve eaten all day. You can eat as long as you don’t cook anything in the back seat, and you take your waste with you.
  • If you need to call someone to tell them you just got into a tremp, so that, let’s say, I don’t abduct you, that’s fine. You can SMS the rest of your conversation to your girlfriend.
  • If you need to make a work call, call someone to pick up your kids, or other life-important call, I will be accommodating.
  • If you jump in ahead of a soldier in uniform, I will kick you out. I might even be polite about it. Depends if I’ve eaten.
  • If you shove ahead of someone who looks old enough to be your grandparent, I will kick you out. I will not be polite about it.
  • I might lower my music. I might continue to sing along. Depends on my mood. You’re welcome to join me if you know the words. If you can harmonize, all the better. If you have better music, I have a Bluetooth device. If you ask me to stop, I will sing louder and off-key.
  • If you need to get out !here! then tell me 50 meters (150 feet) before we get !here!
  • Bus stops are better egress points than !here! Traffic circles are not, but at least I won’t stop in the middle of one to let you out.
  • Egress is יציאה in Hebrew.
  • If you try to sell me something, you will immediately egress. I probably won’t slow down.
  • Just because I drive past a full trempiada doesn’t mean I don’t care. It means either I’m late, you can’t see the packages in the backseat, or I’m only going very locally. I will stop twice next time.
  • I am doing this to pay it forward, so my children will get rides from your parent/spouse/sibling. This is karma.
  • There is no Hebrew word for karma.
  • If I’m a single guy in the car and you don’t want to get in, that’s fine. If you want to get in the back seat, that’s fine. I won’t talk to you anyway, because it’s creepy. Unless you look like you might be one of my kids’ ages and I’m heading back to my yishuv (town). Then I’ll only try to identify myself as such, so it is less creepy.
  • Pull down your skirt. I tell my daughters this, now I’m tellin’ you.
  • If I pick up both boys and girls, there shall be no hitting on one another.
  • If I pick up multiple boys, there shall be no hitting one another.
  • Please keep hands and head inside the moving vehicle at all times.
  • I will accommodate the climate control from my handy-dandy A/C panel. Please do not open your window in the back. They are low-tech and you will forget to roll them up.
  • Don’t tip the driver. Thank them. Then we both get points for being nice gosh-darnit people.

And please remember to always look safe. If you look like someone they wouldn’t invite into their home, they won’t invite you into their car.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/tremping-rules-of-the-road/2014/02/19/

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