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September 21, 2014 / 26 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Hoshana Rabbah’

Day By Day: The Temple Mount Arrests Over Sukkot

Sunday, October 14th, 2012

Over the Sukkot holiday, 12 Jews were arrested and many more were harassed and denied religious rights on the Temple Mount. Eight of the arrests were for prayer crimes and three were for peacefully protesting the policies of discrimination and denigration.

A day-by-day report from activists in the field:

Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 1st Day of Chol Hamoed Sukkot

7:30 am – Jewish pilgrims ascend the Mount with Likud activists Moshe Feiglin. Feiglin is arrested with Chagi Weiss (son of Professor Hillel Weiss) for the crime of praying.

9:00 am – Several dozen observant Jews wait for over an hour at the Mugrabi Gate until being denied entrance. The police, however, allow non-Jewish Tourists to continue to enter the Mount without hindrance.

12:30 pm – The police allow Jewish pilgrims to enter the Mount, however the visit is restricted to several minutes and to a short path between the Mugrabim and Shalshelet gates. One Jew, Haggai Yekutiel from Elon Shvut, was arrested for an arguing with a policeman over the shortened ascent.

Arrest totals = 3

Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012 2nd Day of Chol Hamoed Sukkot

8:00 am – Police permit a Jewish group of pilgrims to ascend the Mount only after making them wait for a half hour, during which time only non-Jewish tourists are allowed in. According to eye witnesses, security personnel are heard complaining, “The religious standing in line interfere with our job.”

8:30 am – The police arrest two Jews on the Mount. Menahem Ben-Yashar, 87 is arrested for bowing down and Elyashiv Cherlow, the son of Rabbi Yuval Cherlow is arrested for reasons not clear.

9:00 am – The police arrest Yehuda Liebman from Yitzhar for no apparent reason.

Arrest totals = 3

Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 3rd Day of Chol Hamoed Sukkot

8:30 am – Jewish pilgrims on the Mount are attacked by the Waqf officials over suspicion that one Jew prostrated towards the spot of the Temple. One of the Waqf officials kicked and punched the Attorney Yehuda Shimon. Other Waqf officials threatened photographers who were filming and tried to break cameras. The police did not make any arrests.

9:00 am – Police arrest Moshe Puah for closing his eyes, while on the Mount.

1:00 pm – Over seventy observant Jews are waiting since 12:30 pm to ascend and make pilgrimage to the Mount, however the police continue to allow non-Jewish tourist to flow freely through Mugrabi gate. The police finally announce that the mountain was closed to Jews. The crowd refused to disperse and protested the blatant discrimination of allowing only non-Jewish tourists to ascend the Mount, but closing the Mount to Jewish pilgrims coming to celebrate the holiday. Riot police are brought in and begin to use great force and violence against the Jewish crowd. Yosef Elyashiv Sade, a resident of Nahariya, witnessed a policeman aim a stun gun aimed towards people in the crowd. Another gentleman Meor Nazari, noticed that the policeman also threatened a 14-year-old boy with the stun gun as well. The police arrested 3.

The videos of the violence can be seen on you tube here and here.

Arrest Totals = 4

Friday, Oct. 5, 2012 4th Day of Chol Hamoed Sukkot

The Temple Mount is closed to all Jewish Pilgrims and non-Jewish tourists.

2:00 pm – Hundreds of Muslims throw stones at the Mughrabi Gate. Police enter the Mount and disperse the rioters.

Shabbat, Oct. 6, 2012 5th Day Chol Hamoed Sukkot, Shabbat

The Temple Mount is closed to all Jewish Pilgrims and non-Jewish tourists.

Sunday, 7,10,2012 Hoshana Rabbah, Sukkot

8:30 am – Police arrest Aviad Shapira and Moshe Spitz on the Mount with their children. Spitz was accused of bowing, but Shapira’s arrest cause was not made clear.

Hoshana Rabbah Rocks

Sunday, October 7th, 2012

Sukkot is by far the most mystical holiday in the Jewish holiday cycle, with the four species and the sukkah and the daily hakafot in shul.

Every day on Sukkot, except on Shabbat, we walk in a circle around a guy holding the Torah in shul, we all hold up our lulvim and hadassim and aravot and—with considerable difficulty and dexterity—the etrogim, and we recite verses, a special group of verses for each day of the seven-day holiday. On Shabbat we also recite special verses, but we don’t do the circle thing.

Then, on Hoshana Rabbah, the seventh day of Sukkot, everything reaches a crescendo and we recite seven groups of verses, and we circle the shul and the Torah sever times, and then we take a bunch of aravot and smack them five times against the floor – and we feel really weird but at the same time strangely liberated and actually quite content if not outright happy.

So today was Hoshana Rabbah in my new shul in Netanya, and I was recalling my special Hoshana Rabbah minyan on East Broadway, in Rabbi Heftler’s shul, where all the guys who were too impatient to endure the 4-5 hour deal up at the Boyan kloyze (the holy place where the first chassidic rebbe in America lived) would go for a shorter, but very uplifting version nonetheless.

In my new shul they don’t blow the shofar at all between the hakafot (those are the circling of the shul). At Rabbi Heftler’s shul they blow the shofar, and during the verses about the fire and everything we’ve lost in the fire, his voice would break down in a tearful cry that rattled my spine like a well honed lulav.

Granted, my new shul was a whole lot more crowded than Rabbi Heftler’s, where getting a minyan even for Hoshana Rabbah is a considerable task. But our rite today was tamer than I’m used to. And no shofar. I should probably try a chassidish minyan next year.

Have a fabulous two-day yom tov and think of us, here in Israel, getting the second day to tend to our cars and our smartphones…

Chag Sameach, dear friends.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/hoshana-rabbah-rocks/2012/10/07/

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