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October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘jewish population’

Israel’s 6 Million Jews Makes It Largest Jewish Center

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

Israel’s Jewish population crossed the 6 million mark during Passover, a symbolic sign of peaceful vengeance for the approximately same number of Jews who were exterminated by the Nazi regime.

The Israel Jewish community, which compromises approximately 75 percent of the total population outside of Judea and Samaria, now is the largest in the world, depending on one’s definition of “Who is a Jew?”

The American Jewish population is estimated by most sources as being 5.5 million, while it is up to 2 million larger if one includes as Jewish those who were born to Jewish fathers but not to Jewish fathers and those who were not converted according to Jewish tradition.

The largest American Jewish population center is in New York City, with approximately 2 million. followed by nearly half a million in Paris.

There are approximately 380,000 Jews in Canada, with most of them living in metropolitan Toronto. Next in Line is Britain’s 290,000 Jews.

“In the world today there are 13,800,000 Jews,” Hebrew University Professor Sergio Della Pergola told the Yediot Acharonot newspaper.

“Israel has indeed experienced a growth in the number of Jews last year, but world Jewry outside Israel did not fare so well. On the contrary, world Jewry has experienced negative growth,” reflecting assimilation.

Although most of the world’s Jews live outside Israel, Israeli historian and author Tom Segev told the London Daily Telegraph, “Within five, seven or 10 years, you might be able to say that most Jews in the world live inside Israel, and it will be legitimate to use the cliché that for the first time in 2,000 years, the Jews are in Israel. Then the question will be, what do you do with the Zionist ideology?”

Israelis are attracted to metropolitan Tel Aviv, but massive government programs, including new highways and rail links, are trying to reverse the trend and encourage Jews to settle in the Negev and the Galilee.

Jews Less than 0.2% of World Population

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

According to a study by Hebrew University’s Professor Sergio DellaPergola, the global Jewish population reached 13.75 million in the past year, with an increase of 88,000 people. Israel’s Maariv newspaper published excerpts of the study last week, reporting that one out of every 514 people in the world is Jewish, less than 0.2 percent of mankind.

About 43% of the world’s Jewish community lives in Israel, making Israel the country with the largest Jewish population. The Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics reported on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, 5773, that the total population of Israel in 2012 grew to nearly 8 million. About 73% of the population is native born.

The Israeli Jewish population stands at 5,978,600, up 1.8%; the Arab population numbers at 1,636,600, up 2.4%; and the rest of the population including Christians and non-Jews reached 318,000 people, up 1.3%. Israel’s Jewish population makes up 75% of the state’s total people.

In all, the Jewish state’s population increased by 96,300 people in 2012, a growth rate that did not diverge from the average rate in the past eight years.

Part of Israel’s population increase comes in part of the new immigrants that have arrived to the country. In 2011, Israel welcomed 16,892 new immigrants as citizens, with the largest populations coming from Russia (3,678), followed by Ethiopia (2,666), United States (2,363), Ukraine (2,051) and France (1,775).

Israel’s population is relatively young compared to populations in other western countries, with 28% of the population aged 0-14. Israel’s life expectancy is one of the highest of the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) 34 member states, with Jewish males’ life expectancy 4.2 years higher than their Arab counterparts.

The Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics also found that 40% of Israel’s population lives in the center of the country, with Tel Aviv as Israel’s densest region, while 17 % lives in the north, 14% in the south, 12% in Jerusalem and Haifa, and 4% in Judea and Samaria.

Over 47,885 couples married in Israel in the past year, of which 75% were Jewish and 21% Muslim. In 2011, there were 166, 296 babies born in Israel.

The world’s principal religious populations divide as follows according to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in 2012: Christians at 33% or 2.1 billion, Muslims at 24% or 1.65 billion, Hindus at 14% or 900 million, and Buddhists at 6% or 350 million. At least one billion people in the world do not ascribe to any religion at all.

New York City Jewish Population Over 1 Million Again

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

The Jewish population of New York City is on the upswing, with a recent study by the UJA-Federation of New York placing it at almost 1.1 million.

The study, commissioned once every decade, focuses on the eight-county New York area – the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island, Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester – that is “the world’s largest and most diverse Jewish community outside Israel.” The researchers interviewed 5,993 adults, asking them a range of questions about their Jewish identity, affiliation, engagement, and their financial status. The study’s margin of error is +/- two percent.

The study found that the Jewish population in the eight counties has grown to 1.54 million, representing a 10% increase since the last study in 2002. The rise in New York City’s Jewish population also reversed a trend registered in the 2002 study, which found that the city’s Jewish population had dropped below a million for the first time in a century.

The study identified three main reasons for the population growth: “high birthrates among the Orthodox, increased longevity, and an increase in the number of people who consider themselves partially Jewish.”

Breaking down the statistics further, 493,000 Jews residing in the eight counties “live in Orthodox households.” These households are marked by “significantly higher levels of Jewish engagement than others, much larger households, and somewhat lower incomes.” Another 216,000 Jews live in Russian-speaking households, and consider themselves “Jews by culture.”

In New York City itself, 40% of Jews identify themselves as Orthodox, which represents a 7% increase since the last study. And in an indication of where New York City Jewry is headed, 74% of all Jewish children in the city are Orthodox.

At the same time, the study found that “Jewish engagement” has dropped since 2002. For example, fewer Jews believe that being Jewish is important (57% in 2011 vs. from 65% in 2002); a higher percentage of Jews never participate in a seder (14% vs. 8%) and never light Chanukkah candles (19% vs. 12%).

The intermarriage rate hovers at 22% for all Jewish couples, but is far higher for the non-Orthodox: over the past five years, half of the non-Orthodox couples that have wed are intermarried.

The clearest conclusion to be drawn from the seemingly disparate trends, according to the study, is that Jewish identity, practice, and engagement has become polarized – the Orthodox streams are growing rapidly, while non-denominational and non-practicing Jews continue to disengage, which in turn results in higher assimilation rates. Furthermore, the chasm between these two demographics only seems to be growing: the number of Conservative and Reform Jews continues to decline, with each movement losing approximately 40,000 members between 2002 and 2011.

In its executive summary, the study suggests that “three features of the…Haredim have significant implications for the future of New York Jewry. First, the high birthrate of Haredi Jews (at least three times that associated with non-Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers)…Second, the Haredim are known to be self-segregated and relatively disconnected from the rest of the Jewish community. Third, relatively high poverty combined with large and growing families suggests that their economic stress is likely to increase in the future.”

The study predicts strong and continuing growth for the Modern Orthodox community as well, but notes that birthrates aren’t as high as in Haredi communities. “Unlike most Haredim,” it adds, “Modern Orthodox Jews are more likely to be fully engaged with the larger Jewish community.”

 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/jewish-news/new-york-city-jewish-population-over-1-million-again/2012/06/12/

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