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December 7, 2016 / 7 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Palestine’

Jimmy Carter to Obama: Grant Recognition to ‘State of Palestine’ at UN

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is urging incumbent President Barack Obama to support an anti-Israel resolution at the United Nations Security Council that would allow the Palestinian Authority to evade its obligation to negotiate a final status agreement and skip directly to independent statehood.

The obligation to negotiate via direct talks with Israel was enshrined in the internationally-recognized Oslo Accords signed between Israel and the Palestinian Authority in the early 1990s. But the Ramallah government has spent the intervening years working to avoid its contractual obligations — the first of which mandate the abolition of incitement to violence and terror against Jews and Israelis and demand direct talks to negotiate a final status agreement.

Instead, representatives for the Palestinian Authority made monumental and successful efforts to evade those responsibilities via proxies in the United Nations General Assembly who helped the entity to methodically upgrade its status unilaterally at the world body without having to negotiate at all.

Now Jimmy Carter, known for years as an advocate on behalf of Gaza’s terrorist leadership and that of the Palestinian Authority in Ramallah, is once again intervening to use his influence in the region.

This time, Carter wrote an op-ed in The New York Times to urge an outgoing president to use his final days to sell out America’s most loyal Middle Eastern ally at the UN.

“It has been President Obama’s aim to support a negotiated end to the conflict based on two states, living side by side in peace,” Carter wrote. “That prospect is now in grave doubt. I am convinced that the United States can still shape the future of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict before a change in presidents, but time is very short.

“The simple but vital step this administration must take before its term expires on Jan. 20 is to grant American diplomatic recognition to the state of Palestine, as 137 countries have already done, and help it achieve full United Nations membership.”

Carter also wrote that security guarantees “for both Israel and Palestine are imperative,” as if that were actually possible. Further measures, he wrote, “should include the demilitarization of the Palestinian state” but did not suggest how that might take place.

Hana Levi Julian

On 69th Anniversary of UN ‘Partition Plan for Palestine’ Arabs Still Hopelessly Stuck

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

On November 29, 1947, by a vote of 33 for, 13 against, and 10 abstained, the UN General Assembly adopted Resolution 181(II) to partition Mandatory Palestine at the end of the British Mandate in 1948. The Plan was accepted by the Jewish Agency for Palestine, despite the fact that it turned Jerusalem into an international city, outside Jewish control, and carved out an enormous section in the center of the country for the future Arab state.

Arab leaders and governments, on the other hand, rejected the partition plan and declared their unwillingness to accept any form of territorial division.

A civil war, known to Jews as The War of Independence and to Arabs as The Catastrophe, broke out in Mandatory Palestine immediately following the adoption of the Resolution by the General Assembly. Then, at midnight on 14 May 1948, the British Mandate expired, and, a few hours earlier, the Jewish People’s Council approved a proclamation, declaring “the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz Israel, to be known as the State of Israel.” The 1948 Arab–Israeli War began with an invasion of the fledgling country by the Arab States on May 15 1948. Hundreds of thousands of Arabs fled the country, never to return, eventually losing the entire area they could once declare their own.

Moshe Ma’oz, professor emeritus of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, explains why the Arabs reject the 1947 partition plan. Noting that some moderate or pragmatic Arabs were prepared to accept a small Jewish state in part of Palestine.

“But the [Husseini family] – not democratically elected but backed by the Arab League – continued to intimidate its moderate brethren and to maintain its uncompromising position against the Jews. Even according to moderate Palestinian intellectuals, this leadership adopted an extreme policy vis-à-vis the idea of two states, thus grossly ignoring the will of the UN and the Great Powers, and leading the Palestinians into war and tragedy.”

“Indeed, this militant syndrome of the Palestinian leadership significantly contributed to preventing a political solution to the Arab-Jewish dispute over Palestine in 1947, as in 1937,” Ma’oz argues. “This syndrome was inspired by an intense Islamic and nationalist ideology, dominated by the Husseini family and in particular, Hajj Amin al Husseini, the charismatic Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and Head of the Supreme Muslim Council.”

“Denying the right of the Jewish-Zionist community to national self-determination even in part of Palestine, the Husseinis periodically used violence and terror against Jews, as well as against the moderate Palestinian Nashashibi faction that for many years cooperated with the Jewish community and acknowledged its national aspirations,” he reiterates, explaining that “this moderate faction, although supported by many families and notables throughout the country, was not as organized, armed, motivated or influential among the younger generation as the Husseinis. Consequently, the moderate/pragmatic Palestinians were unable to neutralize the powerful militant Palestinian nationalist leadership or induce it to accept a political settlement.”

Fifty years after that catastrophic Arab failure, in 1977, the UN declared an International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People, to be celebrated each year on November 29. Special commemorative activities are organized by the Division for Palestinian Rights of the United Nations Secretariat, in consultation with the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.

One would think that on these commemorative events Arab participants would meditate on and recognize their mistakes of the past, and finally adopt a pragmatic, if not friendly approach to their dominant neighbor, the State of Israel.

Not really, to judge by the tone of Arab media’s observance of the November 29 anniversary. One example is an essay by Dr. Ramzy Baroud, “Symbolic ‘solidarity’ is moral defeat: A Palestinian view,” published on the occasion of November 29, 2016, in The New Arab.

“There was no moral or legal basis for that partition, as communicated in UN resolution 181 (II) into a ‘Jewish State’ and an ‘Arab State,'” Baroud writes, pointing out that “Jewish immigrants were granted over 55 percent of the total size of historic Palestine and the ‘Arab State,’ which never materialized, was accorded the rest.”

A quick glance at the map shows that more than half the Jewish portion was awarded in the arid Negev and Arava deserts down south, while the Arab portion was mostly contiguous and captured the bulk of central Mandatory Palestine.

Baroud’s recollection of history is understandably different from the Israeli view: “A few months after that unwarranted partition, well-trained Zionist militias moved from several fronts to ‘secure’ the borders of their promised state, only to take over half of what was designated for the future of the Palestinian state, leaving the indigenous Palestinian Arab population of that land with 22 percent of historic Palestine.”

There were no Arab gangs shooting at Jewish civilians in Baroudi’s narrative, nor is there the invasion by well armed Arab forces from three directions. In the same account, the Jews are “immigrants,” the Arabs “indigenous,” despite the fact that the vast majority of Arabs arrived from all across the Middle East in response to the economic renewal brought by European Jews.

Baroud spells it out: “By adopting a popular Palestinian narrative (not an official one), in which all Palestinians – Muslim or Christians, in Occupied Palestine or in “shattat” (diaspora) – are the center of the story, a better understanding of Palestine and its people can be established, and true solidarity can be offered.”

How should they unite around their national narrative? Simple, Baroud explains, “One major platform for their resistance, which strongly bonds Palestinians at home with those in shattat, is the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which pushes for accountability from those who make the Israeli domination over Palestine possible. It advocates for the Right of Return for Palestinian refugees, the end of occupation and equal rights for Palestinians who live in Israel.”

And so, according to him, “any solidarity that deviates from the current aspirations of Palestinians – as articulated by their fighting women and men, by their prisoners on hunger strikes, by their students fighting for the right to education, by these resilient, but often neglected voices – is not true solidarity.”

And so, in the best tradition of the French Royal House of Bourbon, the Arabs of the Land of Israel have forgotten nothing and learned nothing.

JNi.Media

Stoning Attacks Rise as Netanyahu, Abbas & Obama Arrive at UN General Assembly

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

Stoning attacks by Arab terrorists are escalating on the roads traveled by Israeli drivers, as they do every year when world leaders gather together at the United Nations General Assembly.

On Monday afternoon (Sept. 19), an Israeli bus came under a hail of rocks in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Wadi al-Joz. The bus driver sustained minor injuries and the windshield was smashed. Jerusalem Police launched a search for the terrorist.

Arab terrorists also carried out a stoning attack on an Israeli bus near the Jewish community of Kfar Muchmas in the Binyamin Region. As in the Jerusalem attack, the rocks smashed the windshield of the bus.

Passengers were traumatized but miraculously there were no physical injuries were reported, according to the Hatzoloh emergency response service of Judea and Samaria. IDF soldiers spread out to search for the terrorists.

Hana Levi Julian

Phantom Nation – “Juden Raus!” [audio]

Friday, September 16th, 2016

Today’s conventional wisdom: Judea and Samaria, No Jews Allowed! The last piece of dry land where Jews are not permitted to live.

Phantom Nation 12Sept2016 – PODCAST

Israel News Talk Radio

The Ancient Susiya Synagogue

Sunday, August 21st, 2016

The Israel Museum has reconstructed part of the inside of the ancient Susiya (Susya) synagogue. You can see what a magnificent building it must have been.

The excavated Jewish synagogue in Susiya dates from the 4th to the 7th century CE and was in continuous use until the 9th century CE.

(The Israel Museum) The magnificent synagogue of Susiya in the southern Hebron hills stood for hundreds of years and underwent many renovations. Its bema (podium) was built next to the long northern wall, which featured three arched niches. The central one likely held the Torah Ark, and the two others each held a menorah. The bema’s carved and incised motifs included menorahs, animals, and plants. Numerous donor inscriptions on the walls and floor attest to the community’s active participation in the building’s construction.

Susiya Synagogue in the Israel Museum 2

The Susiya Synagogue in situ:

1024px-SusyaSynogogueInterior Source: Yaacov / Wikipedia

Susiya Synagogue Explanation

Photo of the Day

Google Says It ‘Never Had a Palestine Tag on Maps App’

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

The mammoth Google search engine “never had a label for ‘Palestine’ on its Maps app,” according to a spokesperson for the internet giant who responded to outraged Palestinian Authority journalists who claimed Google deliberately removed the name “Palestine” as part of a plot hatched with Israel to wipe the entity out of existence.

A bug in the system apparently cleared “West Bank” and “Gaza City” from the labeling system, according to the spokesperson — but that change was spotted immediately by a journalist in Gaza.

‘[Our group] condemns the crime carried out by Google in deleting the name of Palestine, and calls for Google to rescind its decision and apologize to the Palestinian people,” the Forum of Palestinian Journalists said in a statement this week.

However, in response, a Google spokesperson said, “There has never been a ‘Palestine’ label on Google Maps, however we discovered a bug that removed the labels for ‘West Bank’ and ‘Gaza Strip.’ We’re working quickly to bring these labels back to the area.”

Thousands of desperate tweets have been — and still are — circulating madly around the internet, with users frantically warning that Palestine has disappeared from Google Maps.

“I thought it was just rumors, but Google completely removed Palestine from Google maps”…. and on and on.

Apparently Google has now become a major player in the diplomatic community — which must be news to the CEO of Google, who probably never signed on to that bird’s nest.

“250 people have signed petition bit.ly/GooglePalestine demanding @googlemaps recognise #Palestine #PalestineIsHere” tweeted Keith Taylor of South East Brussels, a member of the European Parliament from South East England and the Green Party.

Even #BlackLivesMatter is getting into the act — of course it’s a great gravy train to ride for publicity — and is now “standing up for Palestine” as well, although the two issues are in two different places and have absolutely no relevance to each other whatsoever.

Bottom line: There was never a “Palestine” tag to begin with, and the labels “West Bank” and “Gaza” were accidentally deleted, folks.

Take a deep breath. They’re being restored.

Hana Levi Julian

Google under Attack for Deleting Palestine from Maps App

Sunday, August 7th, 2016

Internet giant Google has been under fierce attacks from around the world this week, after replacing the name of Palestine on its maps application with Israel.

The Palestinian Journalists Front slammed Google for the move, stating that the removal of Palestine’s name from the maps was an attempt by the “Israeli scheme to establish its name as a legitimate state for generations to come” while obliterating Palestine forever.

PJF claimed the move was part of an effort to distort history and geography “as well as the Palestinian people’s right to their homeland,” and “a failed attempt to tamper with the memory of Palestinians and Arabs.”

PJF demanded that Google reverse the changes made in the maps application, since the move was “contrary to all international norms and conventions.”

The fact that there is no such entity as the State of Palestine did not come up in the attack.

A search for “Palestine” in Google Maps does yield a proper reference to the entity, but with a blank map of Israel, with the areas of Gaza, Judea and Samaria marked with a broken borderline but not mentioned by name. The information provided on the left under the title “Palestine” is:

Quick facts

The State of Palestine, also known simply as Palestine, is a de jure sovereign state in the Middle East that is recognized by 136 UN members and since 2012 has a status of a non-member observer state.

President: Mahmoud Abbas

Capital: Ramallah

Prime minister: Rami Hamdallah

For comparison, the data regarding “Israel” is:

Quick facts

Israel, a Middle Eastern country on the Mediterranean Sea, is regarded by Jews, Christians and Muslims as the biblical Holy Land. Its most sacred sites are in Jerusalem. Within its Old City, the Temple Mount complex includes the Dome of the Rock shrine, the historic Western Wall, Al-Aqsa Mosque and Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Its financial hub, Tel Aviv, is known for Bauhaus architecture, beaches and nightlife.

Founded: May 14, 1948

Prime minister: Benjamin Netanyahu

President: Reuven Rivlin

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/google-under-attack-for-deleting-palestine-from-maps-app/2016/08/07/

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