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Posts Tagged ‘Queen Esther’

Yoram Ettinger: Purim Guide for the Perplexed 2012

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

1. Purim’s historical background according to the late historian, Prof. Israel Eldad:

*Xerxes the Great – Achashverosh in Hebrew – succeeded Darius the Great and ruled the Persian Empire during 465-486 BCE, 150 years before the rise of Greek’s Alexander the Great.

*Greece was Persia’s key opponent in its expansion towards the Mediterranean and Europe, hence the alliance between Persia and Carthage, a rival of Greece.

*Greece supported Egypt’s revolt against Persian rule, which was subdued by Persia with the help of the Jewish warriors of Yeb (in Egypt) and Carthage, which had a significant Jewish-Hebrew connection (Hanibal and Barca were a derivative of the Hebrew names, Hananyah and Barak).

*Xerxes was defeated by Greece at the 480 BCE Salamis Battle, but challenged Greece again in 470 BCE.

*According to a Greek translation of the Scroll of Esther, Haman (the Agagi) was a Macedonian by orientation or by birth. Agagi could refer to Agag, the Amalekite King (who intended to annihilate the Jews) or to the Aegean Islands. Haman aspired to annihilate the Jews of Persia and opposed improved relations between Xerxes and the Jews Yeb. He led the pro-Greece and anti-Carthage orientation in Persia. Mordechai was a chief advocate of the pro-Carthage orientation.

2. Purim is celebrated on the 14th/15th days of the Jewish month of Adar.

*Adar (אדר) is the root of the Hebrew adjective Adir (אדיר glorious, awesome, exalted, magnificent). It is, also, a derivative of the Akkadian word Adura (heroism).

*Jewish tradition (Babylonian Talmud) highlights Adar as a month of happiness, singing and dancing.

*The zodiac of Adar is Pisces (fish), which is a symbol of demographic multiplication. Hence, Adar is the only Jewish month, which doubles itself during the 7 leap years, during each 19 year cycle.

*Purim is celebrated on the 14th (in non-walled towns) and on the 15th day of Adar (in Jerusalem), commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish People from the jaws of a holocaust in Persia and the 161 BCE victory of Judah the Maccabee over Nikanor, the Assyrian commander.

*Moses – who delivered the Jewish People from a holocaust in Egypt and whose burial site is unknown – was born, and died (1273 BCE) on the 7th day of Adar, which is Israel’s Memorial Day for soldiers, whose burial site is unknown.

*The events of Purim occurred following the destruction of the 1st Temple by Nebuchadnezzar (586 BCE) and the exile from Zion, during the leadership of Ezra who returned to Jerusalem, and the inauguration of the Second Temple (3rd of Adar, 515 BCE) by Ezra and Nehemiah.

*Nebuchadnezzar died in Adar 561 BCE (Jeremiah 52:31).

*Einstein published the theory of General Relativity in Adar 1916.

3. Purim’s Hebrew root is fate/destiny (פור), as well as “lottery” (to commemorate Haman’s lottery which determined the designated day for the planned annihilation of the Jewish People) “to frustrate”, “to annul”(להפר), “to crumble” and “to shutter” (לפורר), reflecting the demise of Haman.

4. Purim commemorates a Clash of Civilizations between Mordechai the Jew and Haman the Iranian-Amalekite. It constitutes an early edition of the war between Right vs. Wrong, Liberty vs. Tyranny, Justice vs. Evil, Truth vs. Lies, as were/are Adam/Eve vs. the Snake, Abel vs. Cain, Abraham vs. Sodom and Gomorrah, Jacob vs. Esau (grandfather of Amalek), Maccabees vs. Assyrians, Allies vs. Nazis, Western democracies vs. Communist Bloc, and Western democracies vs. Islamic terrorism.

5. Purim is the holiday of contradictions and tenacity-driven-optimism: Grief replaced by joy; Esther’s concealment replaced by the disclosure of her national/religious identity; Haman’s intended genocide of the Jews replaced by redemption; Haman replaced by Mordechai; national and personal pessimism replaced by optimism. A Purim lesson: Life is complex, full of contradictions, ups and downs and difficult dilemmas and worthy of principled-determination.

6. Mordechai, the hero of Purim and one of Ezra’s deputies, was a role model of principle-driven optimism in defiance of colossal odds, in the face of a global power and in spite of the Jewish establishment. He fought Jewish assimilation and urged Jews to return to their Homeland. He was endowed with the bravery of faith-driven individuals, such as Nachshon – who was the first to walk into the Red Sea before it was parted. Mordechai was a politically-incorrect statesman and a retired military leader, who practiced “disproportionate pre-emption” instead of defense, deterrence or retaliation.

*The first three Hebrew letters of Mordechai (מרדכי) spell the Hebrew word Rebellion (מרד), which is consistent with the motto/legacy of the American Founding Fathers: “Rebellion against Tyrants is Obedience to G-D.”

*Mordechai did not bow to Haman, the second most powerful person in the Persian Empire. He was a member of the tribe of Benjamin, the only son of Jacob who did not bow to Esau.

*The name Mordechai is also a derivative of Mordouch, the chief Babylonian god.

*Mordechai was a descendant of King Saul, who defied a clear commandment (to eradicate the Amalekites) and spared the life of Agag, the Amalekite king, thus precipitating further calamities upon the Jewish People. Consequently, Saul lost his royal position and life. Mordechai learned from Saul’s error. He destroyed Haman, a descendant of Agag the Amalekite, and Haman’s entire power base, thus sparing the Jewish People a major disaster.

Title: The Queen You Thought You Knew: Unmasking Esther’s Hidden Story

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

Title: The Queen You Thought You Knew: Unmasking Esther’s Hidden Story


Author: Rabbi David Fohrman


Publisher: OU Press & HFBS Publishing


 


 


   Rabbi David Fohrman of the Hoffberger Institute for Torah Study is an engaging speaker and astonishing interpreter of Torah texts, captivating his devoted listeners and readers for decades. The Queen You Thought You Knew: Unmasking Esther’s Hidden Story is his most recent publication, unrolling the Megillah with the excitement of a blockbuster.

 

   The introduction reveals ” the hidden face of the Book of Esther a story that begins in earnest at the point where most of us think the narrative is virtually over.” Fohrman analyses many paradoxical passages in “What’s wrong with the picture” scenarios, making deeply satisfying sense of them.

 

   The chapters “Mother Persia” and “Martial Arts” teach life-lessons and examine the game of political intrigue. Chess-players will enjoy the sly moves that Queen Esther makes in her quest for personal survival and public Jewish rescue. Her timing of banquets, preparation of guest lists and the very words she speaks at specific intervals is sheer genius. The Jewish twist of humor is revealed on following pages.

 

   The “Backyard Gallows” chapter is an incisive analysis of obsession that would serve any psychoanalyst well. Fohrman’s readers will learn that it’s part of a bigger picture. God and his servants Esther and Mordechai all have clever senses of purpose and humor that are dedicated to saving world Jewry.

 

   Both professors of military strategy and readers will learn valuable lessons in the “War Games” chapter about the use of public scrutiny for altruistic gain. Fohrman asks what Mordechai and Esther can do with the king’s signet ring. After all, Achashverosh denied Esther’s request to rescind Haman’s irrevocable decree of death to the Jews. Don’t bother second-guessing the lessons unless you’ve already read the book!

 

   Intriguingly, The Queen You Thought You Knew questions the lack of chronology toward the end of Megilat Esther. “The Sound of Silence” and later chapters will amaze you when that conundrum is addressed. Fohrman unveilsahavat chinam and other halachic themes in the Megillah, overlooked by many Purim celebrants for centuries. Though these realities may never before have registered in your mind, they’re likely to remain there long after you finish The Queen You Thought You Knew: Unmasking Esther’s Hidden Story.

 

   One reading of this fine book is simply not enough. Study the Megillah, as well as halacha and Hebrew grammar at the www.rabbifohrmansite today.


   Yocheved Golani writes at www.itsmycrisisandillcryifineedto.blogspot.com

Siona Benjamin’s Megillas Esther

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

Siona Benjamin’s Megillas Esther
Hebrew Union Collage Museum
One West 4th Street, NY 10012; 212 824 2205
Mon.- Thurs. 9am – 5pm; Friday, 9am – 3pm. 
Free Admission (Photo ID required)

 

 

There is nothing funny about Siona Benjamin’s Megillas Esther (2010).  Unlike some contemporary illuminated megillas that emphasize the absurd and outlandish nature of the corrupt Persian court and the buffoonish character of the king, Benjamin takes the Book of Esther quite seriously.  She is obviously deeply sensitive to the terrible consequences of God’s hester panim (hidden face) in our own time.


Benjamin, a well-known Bene Israel artist originally from Mumbai, India, presents us with a singular perspective on the Esther story.  Set in the visual context of traditional Indian/Mughal miniatures and infused with imagery from her extensive artwork on Jewish themes, this megillah casts the narrative into a potent brew of exoticism and violence.

Her illuminated scroll is eleven and a half inches by fifteen feet long, created over a year and a half in gouache (opaque watercolor) on a parchment prepared in Israel. She worked closely with both her anonymous patron and teacher Rabbi Burton Visotzky (JTS) to develop a megillah that was informed as much by traditional commentaries, her own Jewish/Indian background and contemporary experience. 


Benjamin’s images start innocently enough with a scene of the King enthroned amidst his royal court. One immediately notices the piled-up style typical of Indian miniatures, depicting the turbaned court sages and satraps, including a red-cloaked Haman, all toasting a dancing girl and her drummer.  Her exotic pose evokes a flying angel, alerting us that this is no ordinary banquet and alluding to the unfolding narrative of Vashti’s shocking rebellion   A cameo of Queen Vashti is seen below.


The artist intersperses seven full miniatures between three columns of text each, framed by a solid decorated border above and three rectangular panels of decoration and narrative images below. Additionally she has symbolic images (a brush, a sword, birds, flowers, etc.) flowing between the textual columns as a decorative visual commentary. The effect is hypnotic, calming turquoise borders punctuated by vivid greens and russet earth colors of the illuminations create a vibrant frame for the megillah text written by an Israeli scribe.


The intrusion of threatening long sabers, beautiful exotic birds, peacocks, elephants, deer, gazelles and lions along the top decorative border creates a subliminal counter text that becomes more strident, finally with fire-breathing dragons and prancing camels toward the narrative’s conclusion.  It is as if the natural world with all its mysteries is observing and commenting upon the deeply human story of Esther and her struggles to save the Jewish people.

 


Esther Presented to King Ahasuerus; gouache on parchment by Siona Benjamin
Courtesy the artist

 


Esther Presented to King Ahasuerus is a richly oriental scene crowded with no less than 14 figures. Nonetheless, all is not secure as we see among the crowd and musicians the mysterious eunuch Harbonah and the evil Haman, characterized by a handlebar mustache straight out of classic Bollywood thrillers.


Not surprisingly, Esther dominates the large miniature panels, establishing the narrative primacy of her role.  The seven full panels illustrate: Ahasuerus’s Banquet, Esther Presented to the King, Esther’s First Banquet, Esther’s Confrontation with Haman, the Triumph of Mordechai, Hanging Haman’s Sons and finally the Triumph of the Jews directed by Esther and Mordechai.   What is most singular about the artist’s depiction of Queen Esther is that she is blue.  This is Benjamin’s signature symbol of a unique individual, set off from mankind, alone in piety and determination, and almost goddess-like in her attributes.

 


Esther’s First Banquet; gouache on parchment by Siona Benjamin
Courtesy the artist

 


The fourth panel of Esther’s First Banquet is one of the most stunning images in this megillah, fully evoking its sumptuous Persian miniature forbearers.  The King and Haman are seated alongside a fragrant lotus pond being served by a celestial Queen Esther.  She is wearing a beautiful elaborate costume, elegant blues embroidered with silver and gold.  In contrast to the seated King and Haman, she practically floats into the scene. Vashti even makes a surreptitious appearance under an arch in the building behind them.  In the artist’s vision, Vashti, even though removed from power, hovers in the background watching the drama unfold.

 

 


Esther’s Confrontation with Haman; gouache on parchment by Siona Benjamin
Courtesy the artist

 


Esther’s Confrontation with Haman is a hallucinogenic vision of armed horsemen attacking a swirling Queen Esther as the wicked Haman crouches in the corner, his curved knife ready to slaughter any Jews he can find.  The vivid crimsons and oranges vibrate against the blue Esther and the pale ghostly riders to create a Hitchcock-inspired nightmare.

 


Hanging of Haman’s Sons; gouache on parchment by Siona Benjamin
Courtesy the artist

 


These lush illuminations are simply a prelude to the visual climax of this megillah, the Hanging of Haman’s Sons.  Aside from the fact that as sons of Haman they were also Amalakites, the Seder Olam (Rashi on Megillah 16a) tells us that they had instigated the decree of Achashverosh to halt the rebuilding of the Holy Temple, thereby condemning them to death at the hands of the triumphant Jews.  Set against a vibrant blue sky the evil sons are executed in three explicit ways. Primarily we see all ten hooded and hung in a row on one beam.  To drive home the notion that each was individually evil, their ten heads are impaled on gruesome stakes attached to the top of the beam.  And finally, just to add insult to execution, two archers shoot arrows into their bodies under the direction of Mordechai.  This last detail of the image finds its precedent in an equally vivid 17th century Judeo/Persian manuscript.


Curiously following the execution of Haman’s sons in one of the small border panels is a scene described as the Circumcision of the Gentiles.  It elaborates on the verse 17, Chapter 8 that “many from among the people of the land professed themselves Jews; for fear of the Jews had fallen upon them.” Josephus (Antiquities XI) comments that in order to do this they “circumcised their foreskins ” However we see in Yevamos 24b that “Neither nor the converts of Mordechai and Esther are proper converts unless they become converted at the present time (i.e. without coercion – Rashi).”  But what prompted the artist to depict three clothed men from the waist down, spurting blood as a result of three gruesome knives?  It would seem that Benjamin has taken the verse to mean that the Gentile circumcisions were in fact a kind of punishment on very real enemies of the Jews who tried to escape their fate along their fellow conspirators.  The artist further drives home her point that the Jew’s enemies are doomed in an exceptional illumination within the text itself.  In the space created by classic listing of Haman’s sons she has placed a red-robed figure hung and suspended over a roaring fire. 

 


Triumph of the Jews; gouache on parchment by Siona Benjamin
Courtesy the artist

 


Siona Benjamin’s megillah illuminations do not flinch from the violent retribution the Jews of the kingdom visit upon their many enemies.  And while the final large panel depicts the Triumph of the Jews as a musical celebration complete with hamantashen, drums, horns, dancing and timbrels, it is surrounded by no less than four images of retaliation.  And of course this accurately reflects the overwhelming subject of the end of the Book of Esther.  Chapters 9 & 10 concern themselves with exactly this retribution as “…the Jews struck at all their enemies with the sword, slaughtering and annihilating; they treated their enemies as they pleased. (9:5)” The fact that the megillah enumerates the death of 75,810 Jewish enemies is seldom depicted with such force and originality.


One of the more fascinating elements in this megillah is the consistent representation of Haman in profile, always glancing out at the viewer.  Only once, in the triumph of Mordechai scene, does he not look at the viewer, although still depicted in profile.  While the uses of profiles in the representing individuals are many, usually that specific form represents a cypher of the individual, i.e. a one-dimensional cutout image.  It is as if Haman, the epitome of evil, can only be known superficially.  That said, as he glares out at us, he is especially dangerous.


While Benjamin’s megillah is lushly beautiful to look at, a very serious message is subtly weaved into the fabric of the Persian/Indian images and sacred text.  In a faraway time an evil man arose who planned to destroy all the Jews.  By the intervention of a brave, beautiful woman was the plot uncovered.  Ultimately the disaster was averted only by the annihilation of our enemies.  And then we were free to celebrate.  Today, as our enemies continue to rally, perhaps we need to ponder the lessons of this megillah.

 

Richard McBee is a painter and writer on Jewish Art. Contact him at rmcbee@nyc.rr.com

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities – 4/09/09

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009

Epilogue to Esther’s Story (Part 5)

The following letter was written by Esther on Erev Rosh Chodesh Adar, a day before she boarded her flight and left America to settle in the Holy Land…

My Dear, Dear Angel of Life, Rachel,

I started answering you early this morning (5:00 a.m.). I could not sleep. Aryeh will be here around 3:00 p.m. and I will be occupied with last-minute things. So, I decided to sit and write my last e-mail to you before I leave the USA.

Rachel, the video has been replaying in my head all night – in reverse. I see the years that have passed by, my anguish, depression and torment. But I try to set that aside and to focus more clearly on the scenes and images that have run past ever since my first letter to you, when I was desperate, broken, and unwilling to go on. You read, you understood and you responded.

Your words were like the cool waters on a tired soul and the soft balm on a sun-scorched skin. They actually lifted me from the deep pit of despair I was laying in. You drew out of my pained soul the bitterness, the desperation, and the will to die. In words as wise as King Solomon, you were able to transform the taste of death in my mouth into a tremendous shot of life’s adrenalin and the will to live, to do and to accomplish.

The fat “shopping-bag lady” I had become has metamorphosed back to the almost original self, both bodily and in a healthier soul. Your support and encouragement peeled off the skin of emotional disaster I had been wallowing in for so long. The kind words and wise advice you showered me with enabled a suicidal woman to seek out the “light at the end of the tunnel” – and what light there was, there is!

Hashem sent you as the redeeming messenger to bring me back from the living dead; the letter you printed brought my son back to me and thrust me into the warm embrace of a loving family I would have otherwise never known to exist. No amount of gratitude can ever say what lies in my heart for you.

And last but never the least – Aryeh!!! To think that had Hashem not given me the thought to finally, desperately, reach out for possible help The thought of Aryeh, the crowning jewel of my return to life and the wonderful breath of hope he has brought me this all, my dear Rachel, will forever be marked in Heaven to your credit.

I know you would have liked to see me, to hear my voice to assure yourself that I am real and you are not dreaming, but I cannot yet do that. Not yet, my dear Angel of Life, who has been there for me, with me, every step of the way to my rehabilitation. Perhaps someday in the future perhaps when I am quite old perhaps

And yes, I am real. I am alive, and I am forever thankful that you came into my life.

Stay well, my Dear Rachel. May Hashem shower you with requited love as you have done for me. Do print my entire story, if you wish. Perhaps someone, somewhere out there in our world, will be helped by reading my story, and it will have been worth it.

Shalom, Rachel, and may Hashem be with you forever and ever.

Esther

My Dear Esther,

I do not cry easily, but your heartfelt parting words have moved me to tears.

How apropos that you chose “Esther” by which to disguise your identity – a name that means “hidden.” How appropriate that the date of your departure falls on the day that heralds the month of Adar – a month that celebrates simcha, joy, at G-d’s miracles. And how utterly befitting for you to be crowned Queen by your Prince just as we prepare to commemorate our own Queen Esther.

The happiness I feel for you at this glorious turn in your life is indescribable. You are young yet and full of hope and promise for a beautiful future with a special someone at your side, one who is fortunate to recognize your beauty inside and out. Chasdei Hashem!

At this time, I must beg your forgiveness for anything I ever said in our correspondence that may have hurt you. My intention was only to drag you out of the bottomless, useless and dingy pit you were mired in.

Your praise is too profuse… I take no credit for your transformation. It was G-d’s plan, but I am nonetheless immensely touched and grateful that He allowed me to play a part in it.

From the depths of my being I wish you hatzlachah and a wonderful life filled with endless nachas, joy and fulfillment.

I understand your need for privacy, especially in light of having led a secluded existence for so long, yet I do hope we will one day meet. And who knows… maybe we knew each other in another lifetime…

Please give my best to your adoring son who has my deepest admiration for all that he has done – his kibud eim will stand him well both in this world and the next. He has proven himself to be a model son. (And a model shadchan. Clever and considerate in his strategy, he had you and Aryeh encounter one another without ceremony, keeping his motive to himself – in order to avert discomfort for either of you should nothing have come of your initial meeting.) May G-d repay his tremendous compassion as he goes on to reap much nachas from his beautiful mishpachah for many, many healthy years to come.

Wishing you and all of our readers a sweet, inspirational and meaningful Pesach. Yours, my dear Esther, is sure to be a most memorable one. I’ll be thinking of you and keeping you in my prayers…

L’Shanah Haba’ah b’Yerushalayim!

Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities – 3/06/09

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Dear Victimized,

In your letter (which appeared in last week’s column) it didn’t seem as though you were seeking advice as much as simply needing to air your frustrations and pent-up emotions repressed for the many torturous years of your dysfunctional marriage.

Surely there is much more to this fiasco than the details in your letter reveal, yet you can rest assured that reader sympathy leaned heavily in your favor. How could anyone help but empathize with you and the miserable situation you endured for so long?

At the same time, we are somewhat puzzled. For instance, for most of your letter we are led to believe that your spouse was an uncaring, ungrateful, unfeeling and selfish witch. Then about three quarters of the way into your letter, we are suddenly exposed to your ex-wife’s suffering from an “eating disorder.” That tidbit of information out of left field shifts the force of our emotions, for a person thus affected cannot be held totally accountable for his/her actions.

And of course the question that begs to be asked: Why didn’t you put an end to your distress by ending the marriage long before 14 years elapsed? (You indicate that it was your wife who finally took the initiative to dissolve the marriage.)

Though you don’t state so outright, we are given the impression that you have availed yourself of some counseling, but presumably only towards the very end of your marriage or after you found yourself alone. Consulting a reliable therapist early on would have sooner brought home the realization that you were not to blame for the shabby treatment your ex doled out on a regular basis. Plus, a professional counselor would have steered your wife to receive medical attention for her debilitating condition. And if your relationship had proven to be unsalvageable despite professional guidance, you would have at least been able to resolve to break free of your misery, perhaps at a much earlier time.

If your ex was, in fact, ill when you married her (as you imply), how did she manage to have children, and how badly did having them further wreak damage to her already delicate mental and physical state? Where was her family (who must have been aware of her eating disorder) while all this was transpiring? Where was yours…?

Your story offers some vital lessons.

(1) At the top of the list: Every shadchan (or anyone playing the role) has an obligation to divulge any medical and/or physical condition to the interested party. Withholding such important information will inevitably lead to heartbreak and serious repercussions for the couple as well as their families.

(2) Constant putdowns can affect a victim’s self-worth to the point where s/he will feel deserving of the abusive spouse’s wrath. (Your feeling at fault was a normal reaction to your wife’s abnormal actions.)

(3) Professional marriage counseling can help avert or mitigate the agony of a victim’s “battered person syndrome” (see #2 above).

(4) “Eating disorders” are serious ailments often accompanied by depression and anxiety. They can cause irreversible organ damage and can be fatal if medical attention is not solicited in a timely manner.

(5) You made it clear in your letter that you and your ex-wife were not on the same page in your religious standing. Though this may not necessarily have been the undoing of your marriage, it nevertheless contributed to the discord and underscores the importance of seeking a mate with whom one shares common values and goals.

(6) Every divorce action leads to heartache and emotional upheaval, particularly where children are involved. Badmouthing one’s ex (lashon ha’ra) only serves to compound and prolong the misery all around.

(7) Embitterment and hope cannot co-exist. To get on with a meaningful and purposeful life, one must purge all bitterness from the heart. Life may at times seem unfair, but it is wrong and senseless to judge all of man (or woman) by the actions of some.

(8) A newly divorced person is greeted with Mazel Tov for having dissolved a hopelessly unworkable union and is wished good fortune from here on in – something that can be realized only by leaving the past behind.

You end your letter with a unique observation: “… the first woman on earth gave the first man on earth to eat of the apple so he should not live and so that she could marry someone else.” You then ask, “So who is selfish – man or woman? Who was wronged? Who had the problem, and who is the snake?”

It was, indeed, the first woman who gave the first man to eat of the forbidden fruit, but it was the snake on two feet who instigated the whole spiel, hoping to gain Chava for himself (for he thought that she would first offer the fruit to Adam who would then die).

A forgiving Creator spared the lives of Adam and Chava. The serpent, however, was immediately condemned to lose its legs and to slither on its belly and eat the dust of the earth for eternity – for it had spoken lashon ha’ra against Hashem (when it tried to convince Chava that a jealous G-d did not want man to possess the knowledge only obtainable by eating from the Etz HaDa’as).

Hopefully, you are on the road to a full recovery from your ordeal and are receiving both therapeutic and legal counsel in order to cope and deal with the unfortunate circumstance of your children’s unhealthy living conditions.

Preparing for the Purim holiday brings to mind a most remarkable woman – our brave and beautiful Queen Esther, the Megillah’s heroine who used her attributes and then some to help bring about a miraculous outcome for her persecuted people.

Esther HaMalkah’s beauty shone from within; her outstanding trait of discretion, both in her bearing and speech, is one that every woman should make note of and strive to emulate.

Hatzlachah for a better and brighter future… and Simchas Purim!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/family/chronicles-of-crises/chronicles-of-crises-in-our-communities-147/2009/03/04/

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