web analytics
January 31, 2015 / 11 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post


What’s In A Name?

Lessons-logo

What’s in a name?

Parents possess divine inspiration (ruach haKodesh) when naming their children. In instances wherein a child is named after a departed loved one, we take great care in our choice – in the belief that the best character traits of the person we are honoring will be reflected in our precious progeny’s actions.

The seventh yahrzeit of my beloved mother, Mrs. Rose Tunis (Raizel Mirel bas Elchanan Mordechai), a”h, was approaching and naturally my thoughts about and longing for her were more intense – if that were possible.

Baruch Hashem, since her passing I have been blessed with three precious princesses who carry her name. But my youngest daughter-in-law, Ariella, never met Mommy, and having named her little one for Grama Raizel, as my kids referred to her, Ariella asked me if I could please write down some stories about her to be shared with little Roza Chaya.

First, I found some photos of Mommy that I hoped would reflect her personality. The first one I found accomplished that goal. Although frail at that point, Mommy’s hands were outstretched in a loving gesture towards her great-granddaughters, Chaya and Miriam. The photo brought to mind the portion of Eishet Chayil, wherein our husbands praise their women of valor who open their hands to the poor.

Mommy’s raison d’etre (atzmus) during her lifetime was opening both her heart and both hands to anyone who needed help. Grandstanding was never her way. Everything had to be done quietly. Like the loving mother that she was to her family, she even took the challenges of her children’s friends to heart, offering assistance with a kind word or with financial assistance. In addition, she was secretary of our yeshiva’s simcha and memorial funds. What could be more beneficial than marking life-cycle events by making a donation that would benefit a mosad of learning while simultaneously honoring a ba’alat simcha or providing a zechut for one’s dearly departed?

(One can certainly apply her example today, when so many of us are financially challenged. Smachot, Baruch Hashem, are plentiful. It is very difficult to gift every person who wants our presence but not our presents when we participate in numerous smachot. A donation to a worthwhile charity is a lovely way to celebrate as well as to benefit others.)

Family mattered so much to my mother. From the tender age of 11, she cared for her mother, “Mama” Chaya Ita, a”h.

And our home was the address to which all members of our extended family were drawn. One could say without exaggeration that Mommy was the yesod (foundation) of her entire extended family.

Recently, we marked the yahrzeit of my paternal cousin, Billy, a”h. During his last weeks he got it into his head that he had to eat one final time at his Aunt Rose’s table. Against better judgment, he drove cross-country – on painkillers – to accomplish his goal. And he succeeded.

Not only did his Aunt Rose nourish his body, she also offered his soul the ultimate comfort. She delicately explained to Billy, who was non-observant, how important it was to make certain that Kaddish would be said for him. Having no survivors of his own, Mommy asked him if she could arrange the Kaddish. He readily agreed. He passed away three weeks later.

While sitting shiva for Mommy, my childhood friend came to visit and reminisced about Mommy’s famous chocolate chip cookies. My daughter’s friends used to refer to Grama Raizel as the “Cookie Bubby.” If one were fortunate he or she would be the recipient of her amazing cookies that she stored in those Quaker Oats cardboard containers.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “What’s In A Name?”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Jeremy Bird, working for Israeli campaign outfit V15, shown at Ted Talk, May 20, 2014.
V15 US Political Operative Marinated in Hate-Israel Activism
Latest Judaism Stories
Staum-013015

People often think that all they are missing is “just a little more” and then they can be truly happy.

Torah-Hakehillah-121914

The Midrash is teaching a fundamental message of what it means to be a religious person.

Rabbi Sacks

Torah opposes slavery; G-d desires the free worship of free human beings, yet slavery’s permitted-?!

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

France allowed Islamists to flourish despite their loyalty to Islamic sharia law not French values

Approximately 18 years ago, my uncle called me into his office saying he had an urgent matter to discuss. I didn’t know what he had in mind.

“Where is God?” asked the Kotzker Rebbe “God is not everywhere but only where you let Him enter”

An Explosion In The Trench
‘With A Glowing Hot Knife’
(Yevamos 120b)

Her first tactic was tefillah; she immediately began to recite one perek after another of Tehillim.

When a miracle occurs that transcends nature, Hashem has broken the laws of nature to create the miracle.

“How could you have expected my glasses to be there?” argued Mr. Weiss. “You shouldn’t have to pay.”

Rather than submit to this fate and suffer torture and humiliation, Shaul decided to fall on his sword.

How can the Da’as Zekeinim say this was Hashem’s plan to allow them to become the Torah Nation? We know it was actually a punishment.

A strange midrash of fruit trees surrounding the Nation of Israel as they walked to freedom

Leading by example must be visible, regarding where, when and how-like Nachshon entering the Red Sea

Rabbi Yaakov Nagen, a Ram at Yeshivat Otniel, notes that the verse is suggesting that retelling the story of the Exodus is so important that Hashem is performing ever-greater miracles specifically so that parents can tell their stories to future generations.

More Articles from Penina Metal
Lessons-Emunah-logo

“Daddy,” I exclaimed, “Is this how you daven?” Daddy’s response was a hearty laugh. I felt so proud of myself.

Lessons-Emunah-logo

I vowed that when I would grow up, I would speak Yiddish to my kinderlach and I would move to “a place called Crown Heights.”

He exhorted all of us to continue to reach out to one another each and every day because that is what our tafkid (life’s goal) should be. And because that is what Hashem requires of us.

Parents possess divine inspiration (ruach haKodesh) when naming their children. In instances wherein a child is named after a departed loved one, we take great care in our choice – in the belief that the best character traits of the person we are honoring will be reflected in our precious progeny’s actions.

My home is furnished simply. One notes the customary family photos and bric-a-brac that makes a house a home, but certain items are my priceless treasures.

The zaidie sat at the head of the dining room table. I was a small child and unaware that my friend Esther’s grandfather was the revered rosh yeshiva at Yeshiva University, Rav Moshe Aaron Poleyeff, zt”l.

It took a few months, but I finally summoned up what little koach I had to go to the Lubavitcher Rebbe, zt”l, for “Sunday Dollars.” I wanted to take my new baby to the Rebbe. Although he was about three months old at the time, I had not been strong enough until now to attempt a trip to 770 Eastern Parkway.

With so much to do before our recent trip, I was walking on a cloud.

It must have been evident to one and all, since my feet barely touched the ground.

Who would have believed that I would arrive at this special time – so grateful am I to HaKadosh Baruch Hu?

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/whats-in-a-name/2014/01/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: