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December 10, 2016 / 10 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Beit Shemesh’

Neve Shalom Residents Evacuated in Late-Night Blaze

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

Jerusalem region firefighters decided overnight to evacuate residents from a row of houses on the outskirts of the Jewish community of Neve Shalom as a late-night brush fire continued to burn into the wee hours of Tuesday.

The Latrun forest was also ablaze late Monday night as well, keeping firefighters busy on more than one front.

Firefighters and Jerusalem District Police decided together with the local forces commander in Beit Shemesh that it was safer to evacuate the residents in the first row of houses in Neve Shalom, given the proximity of the flames.

According to regional fire and rescue spokesman Udi Gal, the firefighters were attempting to contain the blaze at the outskirts of the community and to keep the fire contained within the open ground.

It’s not yet clear what sparked either blaze.

Hana Levi Julian

CBS: For the First Time Ever, Jewish, Arab Fertility Rates Identical

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

An announcement by Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) on the occasion of the International Child Day 2016 states that, for the first time since the creation of the state in 1948, Israeli Jewish women’s overall fertility rate has matched that of Israeli Arab women: 3.13 children per woman on average. This means that the Jewish demographic trend is on the upswing, while the Arab numbers are slowing down. Kindly share this by the Thanksgiving table when the issue of the “demographic time bomb” rears its predictable head.

The announcement shared a fascinating list of facts and figures on the heartwarming topic of Israeli children. Such as that by the end of 2015 there were 2.798 million children ages 0 to 17 living in Israel, constituting 33% of the population. In Jerusalem children are 40% of the general population, in Haifa 23% and in Tel Aviv only 21%.

Out of Israel’s children, 1.996 million are Jews (71.3%), 718 thousand are Arab (25.7%) and the rest, 84 thousand children (3%), are neither.

By the end of 2015, the average number of children under age 17 per household was 2.4. The largest number of children per household was in Beit Shemesh — 3.8, B’nei B’rak — 3.4, and Jerusalem — 3. The lowest number of children per household was in Bat Yam — 1.8.

Here’s another heartwarming bit of data: a whopping 92% of Israeli children live with both parents; only 8% — 210 thousand children — live with one parent, 92% of them with their mother.

How about child brides? In 2014 865 girls under the age of 17 got married, 88% of them Muslim. Then, in 2015, 216 girls under age 17 gave birth, out of whom 248 were Muslim and 58 Jewish. For 7% of those it was not their first birth.

In 2015, 200 thousand children lived in homes where no one was employed, 5.5% of the Jewish population, 14% of the Arab population.

In the Jewish year 5774 (2013/14) 10,673 criminal files were opened against children ages 12 to 18.

In 79 thousand households children were the victims of theft, violence or threat of violence, sexual violation, and cyber crime.

Economics: the average net income for a household with children was 1.3 higher than a household with no children — $55,135.32 annually, compared with $42,539.52. However, expenses for the households with children was 1.4 higher, $45,831.6 vs. $32,545.44.

JNi.Media

3,600-Year-Old Jewels Found in Judean Foothills

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

by Ilana Messika

Israeli archaeologists on Monday announced the discovery of a rare treasure of gold and silver objects dating back about 3,600 years to the Middle Bronze Age, or the Canaanite period. They were found in the archaeological site of the Tel Gezer National Park, in the Judean foothills near Beit Shemesh.

The excavation was conducted by Dr. Tzvika Tzuk, Director of Archaeology for the Israel Nature and Parks Authority in collaboration Dr. Eli Yanai, a retired Israel Antiquities Authority researcher, and Drs. Dan Warner and Jim Parker from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

“This finding is a very significant find to help date the building and show the cultural transparency from Mesopotamia all the way in history down to the State of Israel,” stated Dr. Warner, who is also a historian and Bible teacher.

The treasure constitutes a foundation deposit for the rooms which, according to the archaeologists, represented offerings to deities, a theory supported by the administrative nature of the building and its proximity to the city gates.

“This is a foundation deposit, we found it underneath the house,” Dr. Warner told TPS. “They placed it there to appease the gods so that their house would still stand. These are the tallest preserved walls from this time period anywhere in Israel.”

Researchers managed to separate the findings into five separate parts, while some fragments of silver pieces such as rings and necklace could not be separated due to intensive corrosion.

The central deposit is a pendant with an eight-pointed star within a 3.8 cm diameter disc and a crescent on top of it, which represents a well-known symbol dating more than 1,000 years before that time period. Dr. Irit Ziffer identified the symbol as representing both Ishtar, the Mesopotamian East Semitic goddess of fertility, love, war, sex and power, as well as the Chinese moon god of the Akkadian culture.

The rest of the treasure is comprised of a gold banded scarab from Egypt dated to the Hyksos period, a silver chain, an earing, and another pendant that resembles an arrow.

The treasure was found in one block wrapped in cloth deposited in lidded pottery. Dr. Orit Shamir and Dr. Naama Sukenik of the organic material laboratory of the IAA identified  the cloth as linen cloth according to the shape of the threads and weaving techniques.

Dr. Warner told TPS that the material in which the treasure was wrapped is one of the oldest pieces of fabric found in Israel, apart from the ones discovered in Megiddo, while only two textile samples from the Canaanite period have been found, one in Jericho and one in Rishon LeTzion.

“During the Canaanite period, Gezer was one of the cities of primordial importance in Israel and its significance continued until the moment King Solomon built the city anew ,” said Shaul Goldstein, CEO of INPA.

“This finding is  a significant achievement, which sheds light on the Canaanite culture in Israel more than 3,600 years ago, and further consolidates the position of the Tel Gezer National Park site as an archaeological gem with great significance to Israel,” Goldstein said.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Magistrate Court Refusing to Rule on IDF General’s Jurisdiction Inside the ‘Green Line’

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

A Petah Tikva Magistrate Court judge on Tuesday ruled that a man accused of defying an administrative restraining order issued by the OC Central Command remain free until his trial, but refused to rule on the extent of the authority of the IDF Central Command within the “green line,” Honenu legal aid society reported.

Police on Sunday arrested a young Samaria resident in his 20s claiming he had violated an executive order handed him by OC Central Command Gen. Roni Numa. The order instructed the young man to remain in the community of Tzofim, northeast of Kfar Saba, in Samaria, and observe a curfew in his parents home in the same community. But the young man has chosen instead to reside in Beit Shemesh and, in fact, received the order in Jerusalem.

Honenu attorney Menashe Yado, representing the defendant, sent an appeal to the OC Central Command arguing that the law does not give the IDF chief executive in Judea and Samaria any legal jurisdiction inside pre-1967 Israel, so that the restraining order was inherently a breach of the military’s authority.

Last Sunday, about three weeks after said correspondence had taken place, the young man was arrested in the Beit Shemesh area and was indicted in the Petah Tikva Magistrate Court on five items of violating a restraining order, based on testimony of police who looked for him at his parents’ home and did not find him there. Police then asked for his detention, claiming that he posed danger to the public.

Honenu Attorney Avichai Hajbi, who represented the defendant at the hearing, argued that the chief of Central Command has no jurisdiction outside Judea and Samaria, noting the correspondence to that effect which had been conducted with the IDF. Hajbi also questioned just how dangerous police really considered his client to be if they had let three weeks lapse between the day they discovered his absence and the day they picked him up.

Judge Eti Craif ruled the defendant could go free, conditioned on providing alternative detention, but refused to rule on the issue of the IDF General’s jurisdiction, noting that as long as the restraining order itself is valid, the only place to discuss it is in a military appeals committee.

Attorney Hajbi expressed satisfaction at the fact that his client was released, even though the court completely ignored his main argument.

JNi.Media

Firefighters Get Control Over Jerusalem-Area Forest Fires Near Beit Shemesh, Givat HaMatos

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Firefighters were once again faced with flames in the forests around Jerusalem as the temperatures soared and dry air created a tinderbox among the trees.

A team of four firefighters managed to get control of a forest fire in Horesh, in the area of Givat HaMatos, according to local officials by around 2 pm Tuesday afternoon.

There was a serious concern the blaze would reach buildings located in the area; as a result, people living in nearby caravans temporarily evacuated their homes.

Likewise, a similar firefighting team of four was deployed to the forested hills surrounding the area near the southwestern Jerusalem suburb of Beit Shemesh.

The flames had reached an abandoned forest, but firefighters managed to bring the blaze under control, said Fire and Rescue Department spokesperson Udi Gal.

No injuries were reported from either site.

Hana Levi Julian

Jerusalem Day Special: Ancient City’s Latest Facts and Figures

Sunday, June 5th, 2016

In honor of Jerusalem Liberation Day, which is being celebrated on Sunday, June 5 this year (because Israeli holidays go by the Jewish calendar), the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) has issued a plethora of stats about the city, gathered in the years 2014-15. So, here’s a sampling of everything you may have wanted to know about the tangible Jerusalem of this world:

Jerusalem is the largest city in Israel. By the end of 2015, there were bout 870,000 residents living in the eternal city, roughly 10% of Israel’s population.

Compare this with 2014, when Jerusalem boasted only 850,000 residents, out of whom 534,000 were Jews and others (63%) and 316,000 Arabs (37%).

Out of the Jews of Jerusalem, 32% define themselves as ultra-Orthodox, 17% are religious, 13% traditional-religious, 15% traditional but not so religious, and only 21% are secular.

Of those additional 20,000 residents, about 19,800 were added via natural reproduction, about 3,700 moved in from the rest of the country and from abroad, and about 3,500 left to other locations.

The main sources in Israel of migration to Jerusalem are the cities of Beit Shemesh, Tel Aviv, and B’nai B’rak. Jerusalemites who leave the city go to Beit Shemesh, Tel Aviv, and the enclave of Givat Ze’ev which borders Jerusalem.

The overall fertility rate (average number of children a Jerusalem woman is expected to bear in her lifetime) in Jerusalem is 3.91, far higher than the national average of 3.08.

A Jerusalem average household has 3.8 members, also larger than the national average of 3.3.

On the work front, though, Jerusalem could improve a lot: only 51% of Jerusalem residents are counted in the work force, compared with 64.1% nationwide. This does not necessarily mean folks in Jerusalem don’t work for a living, it could mean more of them fail to report.

Jerusalemites don’t like to commute: 88.4% of the city’s working residents are employed in their city, compared with 71.7% in Haifa, 62.2% in Tel Aviv, 57.2% in Ashdod, 44.4% in Petach Tikvah, and 36.2% in Rishon L’Tzion.

Jerusalem retains its residents: a full 77% of them have lived in the city for more than 20 years.

While 57% of Israelis nationwide are satisfied with the size and proportion of green spaces in their cities, only 30% of Jerusalemites believe they have enough parks.

In the school year 2014-15, 65.5% of Jerusalem students were in Haredi educational institutions, compared with 65.3% in 2013-14. This trend has continued persistently, as the number of ultra-Orthodox students is going up and secular students’ down.

In related statistics: fewer than half (48%) of 12th grade students in Hebrew education institution took the matriculation exams in 2013-14, compared with 51% the year before. This means that more than half of the city’s young people are eligible to attend college.

Also related: Jerusalem registers the lowest average annual income out of Israel’s eight largest cities: $37,944.36.

As for housing, 57.9% of Jerusalem residents own their apartment or home, 30.9% rent, and the rest live in school dormitories or rent paying a key fee (one high amount up front, followed by small monthly payments). The average price for a Jerusalem apartment is $484,026.34, the average monthly rent is $826.12.

Regarding visitors: 78% of tourists who arrived in Israel made sure to visit Jerusalem (the rest, mostly Scandinavians and Germans, presumably landed directly on Eilat’s magnificent beaches down south).

Close to 900,000 foreign visitors spent a night in Jerusalem’s hotels, marking close to 3,000,000 nights altogether.

JNi.Media

Prolonged Heat Wave Causing Numerous Forest Fires Across Israel

Sunday, May 15th, 2016

The heavy heat wave, now in its second day, continues to cause fires around Israel. A forest fire broke out Sunday morning in Daliyat al-Karmel, a Druze town onn Mount Carmel, some 13 miles southeast of Haifa, News 0404 reported. Firefighters are at the burning forest, assisted by two firefighting planes.

Open area fires have broken out Sunday in Tel Mond, a suburb of Netanya, as well as near Route 85, between Acre and Jadeidi-Makr.

Firefighters have also been at work putting out a brush fire near Palmachim in Rishon Letzion, as well as another, similar fire near the Kesem Interchange on Toll Highway 6.

Residents have been evacuated from their homes as large firefighting forces—eight teams—are trying to overcome a major forest fire near Moshav Luzit south of Beit Shemesh. The fire has damaged local chicken coops. Four planes are involved in the operation.

Seven firefighting teams are fighting a fire in Mata, also near Beit Shemesh. Route 435 was closed to traffic. Another fire broke out near Abu Gosh, on the main highway to Jerusalem, and the wind is causing the fire to spread fast.

A natural forest in the neighborhood of Naveh Sha’anan in Haifa has been on fire on Monday, with six teams laboring to put it out. Yeshiva children nearby have been evacuated.

David Israel

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/prolonged-heat-wave-causing-numerous-forest-fires-across-israel/2016/05/15/

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