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May 2, 2016 / 24 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘JEWS’

Venice Jews Mark 500th Anniversary of World’s First Ghetto

Monday, March 28th, 2016

The Jews of Venice are appealing on behalf of the Muslim immigrants who are reaching the shores of Italy as they prepare to mark the half-millennial anniversary of the first ghetto.

The event commemorates the opening of the Jewish ghetto of Venice, created on March 29, 1516 to separate the Jews from the primarily Christian population of the time.

A series of cultural events are slated to take place this Tuesday to mark that date. The Jews of Venice say they believe their history can teach Europe that minorities can integrate while preserving their identities.

University Professor Shaul Bassi told The National in an interview on Monday, “Those of us who have worked on this anniversary believe the ghetto has precious ethical and cultural lessons to educate the public about Jews as well as the broader question of cross-cultural dialogue, co-operation and co-existence.

“Today, Italian Jews are proof that a minority can keep its identity and still integrate in a process of reciprocal influence,” he said.

“Elsewhere in Europe Jews were treated worse, and Venice to some extent was a safe harbor,” said Paolo Gnignati, leader of Venice’s Jewish community. “The city wanted them to come because they needed access to Jewish trading networks; it was good business on the part of the doges.

“We were deprived of our rights here, but contributed to Europe’s identity and we are still here,” Gnignati said. “We can serve as an example to newcomers who want to participate in Europe while preserving their original identity.”

The word “ghetto” in Italian is “geto” from “gettare,” the verb “to cast.” The Jews were forced into a cramped, polluted area surrounded by canals for the next 300 years. They were locked in at night and forced to pay the wages of their Christian guards.

During the day they were required to wear yellow caps to identify them as Jews (does any of this sound familiar?) as they entered the rest of the city. They were also ordered to use Christian architects to build the five synagogues in the ghetto itself, which remain today. Because the ghetto was so small, the Jews ended up creating the first skyscrapers, building apartments one on top of the other in order to accommodate the growing population. Some of the buildings, eight or nine stories high, are still the tallest in the city.

Napoleon knocked down the gates of the ghetto when he occupied Venice in 1879, allowing Jews to live where they chose.

By the time of World War II, the city’s Jewish population had dropped from 5,000 to just over 1,000. During the war, 246 of the city’s Jews were sent to die in the concentration camps. Only eight returned.

Today in Venice only 450 Jews remain, with just a handful in the ‘ghetto.’ The five synagogues there are still open, and Venetian Jews say they’re urging incoming Muslims to learn from their history in order to survive.

Hana Levi Julian

Al-Qaradawi : The Jews Turned Their Deserted Land Into an Oasis

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Some statements by Islamic scholar Yusuf al-Qaradawi in 2005.

Video of the Day

Q: How Much Do You Hate Palestinians/Israelis?

Sunday, December 27th, 2015

Video of the Day

Research Links Being Religious with a Happy Life – but only for Jews

Friday, December 25th, 2015

Observant Jews are happier with life, and Jews living in Hareidi cities can expect to live longer than others, according to a new study by the Taub Center for Social Studies.

However, the researchers cautioned:

It is important to note that the relatively positive self-reports of Hareidim may also be due to a social norm that frowns on complaining, and would particularly disapprove of ‘airing one’s dirty laundry’ in the context of a secular survey.

Previous studies have concluded that religious involvement is a factor in satisfaction with aspects of living, and Taub researchers reported:

Relatively high percentages of Hareidim attest to being very happy with their relationships with family members: 80.2 percent versus 62.7 percent or less in other population groups….

A relatively low percentage of Hareidim report feelings of loneliness. Only 11.4 percent of Hareidim said that they were lonely, compared with at least twice that amount among other groups.

The link does necessarily apply to non-Jews. The researchers stated::

A rise in satisfaction levels moving up the religiosity scale does not appear among non-Jews. About 37.7 percent of non-Jewish respondents in the study who identified as very religious or religious felt lonely – more than the not very religious (30.7 percent) and the non-religious (30.0 percent).

The report also stated that Hareidim can expect to live three years longer than others in Israel.

A direct link was found “between a city’s socioeconomic and the life expectancy of its residents” but the trend is different for Hareidim in Beit Shemesh, Bnei Brak and Jerusalem, according to the study.

The researchers also noted a study carried out in 1996 that showed that national religious Jews living on kibbutzim have a lower mortality write than secular kibbutzniks.

The 1996 study stated:

These findings indicate that, even in closed and highly-structured communities such as kibbutzim, level of religious observance has an impact on health status.

The latest Taub study noted that then-Finance Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s drastic reduction in child welfare payments more than a decade ago, in addition to the global financial crisis in 2008, “hurt Hareidi families financially” but also ” led many Hareidim to vocational study and employment.”

 

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

O’Malley Upgrades – or Downgrades – Jesus from ‘Palestinian’ to a ‘Refugee’

Friday, December 25th, 2015

Jesus was “a refugee child who fled death gangs,” according to Democratic presidential hopeful Martin O’Malley.

O’Malley can forget about the Orthodox Jewish vote. His crass comment that managed to implicate Biblical Jews as “death gangs” also once again re-event Jesus into a politically correct figure.

The Palestinian Authority reinvented Jesus as a the first “Palestinian” in recent years,  but PA chairman Mahmoud Abbas this year settled  for simply calling him “a symbol for all Palestinians.”

It is not clear what the symbol means to the Palestinian Authority, but the Abbas regime does not look like it has any chance of being resurrected.

A recent poll by the respected  Ramallah-based Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research revealed that only 45 percent of respondents support “the two-state” proposal and 65 percent believe that it is no longer practical.

As for Abbas, he is in the cellar among the respondents. If elections were held today, six years after Palestinian Authority Arabs were supposed to vote for a chairman, Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh would handily defeat Abbas by a 10-point margin.

O’Malley’s Christmas Eve comment on Jesus as a refugee was a barb to Republican front-runner Donald Trump, who wants to deport hundreds of illegal immigrants.

Trump is not the only one. The Department of Homeland Security reportedly is planning to deport hundreds of immigrants from Central America who fled violence.

Nevertheless, O’Malley tweeted:

A Christmas Refugee Roundup sounds like something [Trump] would concoct. Remember: Jesus was a refugee child who fled death gangs.

 

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

It’s Chinese Food Season

Thursday, December 24th, 2015
Photo of the Day

Bennett Worried about Jews – the Ones in the Diaspora

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

Assimilation is murdering Judaism, except in Israel.

Naftali Bennett told Jewish legislators from around the world this week that he is more worried about Jews in the Diaspora than those in Israel, the European Jewish Press (EJP) reported.

Speaking at the International Council of Jewish Parliamentarians (ICJP), the Education Minister and chairman of the Bayit Yehudi (Jewish Home) party said that streams of Judaism must be accepted.

However, he then opened a can of worms by stating, “A Jew is a Jew is a Jew.”

The answer to “who is a Jew” vastly varies and is at the heart of disputes between Orthodox Judaism and the Reform and Conservatives streams.

EJP quoted Bennett as telling the legislators visiting Israel:

I’m not worried about Israel. I’m worried about Diaspora Jews. That’s what keeps me up at night.

Assimilation is as big a loss to the Jewish people as the expulsion of the 10 tribes.

The chairman of the .ICIP is New York Congressman Eliot Engel and includes former Canadian justice minister Irwin Cotler, French MP Meyer Habib, as well as legislators from Chile, Brazil, Belgium, Romania, Hungary and Ukraine.

Also addressing the conference was Michael Oren, former Ambassador to the United States and now a Knesset Member in the Kulanu party.

EJP reported that he said that labeling products from Judea and Samaria that they are made in the “occupied territories” is “anti-Semitic.”

Oren explained:

There are hundreds of territorial disputes in the world. Only Israeli products are being labeled.

Opposition leader Yitzchak Herzog repeated his refrain that “we need to separate from the Palestinians” and followed with the usual non-solutions.

Instead, he declared, “It has to be resolved – but right now, if you look at the mood of the people, it’s at its worst ever… You can’t disregard the notion of the two-state solution. If that’s over, you’ll be moving to the one-state solution whether you like it or not… the reality is impossible… you can’t govern another people.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/bennett-worried-about-jews-the-ones-in-the-diaspora/2015/12/23/

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