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April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Cairo’

Morsi to Cut Off Relations with Syria

Sunday, June 16th, 2013

Egyptian’s Muslim Brotherhood President Mohammed Morsi announced Saturday he will cut diplomatic ties with the regime of  Bashar Assad and close Cairo’s embassy in Damascus.

He also demanded that Hezbollah leave Syria adding, “There is no business or place for Hezbollah in Syria.”

Morsi spoke at a rally organized by hardline Islamists, whose clerics told approximately 20,000 people that Morsi should assist the rebels trying to bring down Assad.

Suspected Israel Bedouin Spy on Hunger Strike in Egyptian Prison

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

An Israeli Bedouin serving a life prison sentence in Egypt on charges of being a spy has begun a hunger strike to draw attention to his plight, the Egyptian Ahram website reported.

Ouda Trabin was sentenced in 2000 on charges of espionage. Voice of Israel public radio aired on Wednesday a letter he sent to Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and the Israeli Ambassador in Cairo.

Israel negotiated with Egypt last year for his release in exchange for 65 Egyptians in jail in Israel, but Trabin was not included in the final agreement, which won the release of American-Israeli Ilan Grapel. He has been arrested for allegedly spying on Egypt on Israel’s behalf but was not brought to trial.

Cairo Anniversary Rallies Clashed with Police Teargas

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

On Saturday, the April 6 Youth Movement, a leading force behind the 2011 revolution and a powerful actor on the political scene since, commemorated the fifth anniversary of a historic strike in the city of Mahalla with anti-government protests in Cairo and a number of other areas, Al Ahram reported.

The situation in Cairo deteriorated when security forces inside the High Court building fired teargas at the crowds outside.

Sporadic clashes between protesters and police are reportedly still ongoing.

The April 6 Youth Movement, founded in 2008 to support striking textile workers in the Mahalla, announced last week that it would celebrate the anniversary with protests against the government of Mohamed Morsi, who “failed to deliver on the promises of the revolution.”

“We supported President Morsi when he ran for presidency. Now, after he issued his constitutional declaration, rammed through a new constitution and failed to meet the goals of the revolution we have joined the ranks of the opposition,” said Ahmed Maher, co-founder of the April 6 Youth Movement.

Protesters’ anger was focused on the interior ministry.

Other opposition parties joined in the call for anti-government protests.

Four main marches took place in Cairo, and all four marches headed for the office of Prosecutor-General Talaat Abdullah. Abdullah, who was appointed by President Morsi, has come under fire after a wave of pre-trial detentions of protesters and arrests of well-known activists and media figures, including satirist Youssef Bassem.

A Qatari flag was burned at one of the rallies, in protest of that country’s support for the Muslim Brothers, and van of the Qatar-based Al Jazeera television channel was greeted with hostile shouts.

At night, as the rallies descended on the High Court where the prosecutor-general’s office is located, teargas was fired from inside the court building at the loud but peaceful rallies gathered outside Security forces continued to fire intense teargas volleys at protesters, who rallied in nearby streets and continued to press towards the High Court.

The April 6 Youth Movement issued a statement late on Saturday night condemning the country’s security forces’ firing of teargas.

“The regime’s ministry of interior respond to chants with teargas and birdshot,” read the statement published on the movement’s official Facebook page.

The movement accused the ministry of interior of “prostituting” for every Egyptian regime.

Obama’s Call for Protest in Israel

Sunday, March 24th, 2013

President Obama’s visit to Israel, and particularly his speech to 500 university students, was a winner at many levels including one he probably had not even considered. In how many countries can the President of the United States call forth the passions of the local people and have confidence that he is calling forth the “better angels”? He did it in Israel.

The President touched on deeply felt emotions for Israelis, worked hard at erasing the faux pas of relating Israel’s national origins to the Holocaust, twice declined to call Israeli settlements “illegal” while standing next to P.A. leader Mahmoud Abbas, and he praised Israeli technology, ingenuity, democracy and culture. Remarking on the upheaval in the Arab world he said, “So much of what people in the region are seeking is happening here [Israel].”

Yes, that is something he should have said in Cairo or Ramallah. And yes, he called for a “two state solution” that has little chance of success. And yes, yes, he made false analogies between Palestinians and Israelis. And yes, yes, yes, he called Abbas, whose single elected term expired in 2009 and who has been increasingly repressive and willing to incite against Israel and the U.S., a “partner.” And no, Israel cannot “reverse an undertow of isolation,” that is generated by other people in other lands who do not accept that, at the end of any “peace process,” Israel will still exist.

But okay. Those are things that should have been and were expected from President Obama. It was also expected that he would encourage his youthful, carefully selected, leftish college student audience to push the rightish government of Israel to do what he could not convince Prime Minister Netanyahu to do. He directly asked the audience to pressure its government.

In full campaign mode, Mr. Obama told them:

Speaking as a politician, I can promise you this: political leaders will not take risks if the people do not demand that they do. You must create the change that you want to see. (People can) overcome a legacy of mistrust that they inherited from their parents… Your voices must be louder than the extremists who would drown them out. Your hopes must light the way forward.

That is a call to protest, to political insurrection. The interesting part is that he assumed igniting a political firestorm in Israel would have a positive effect.

Unspoken — maybe because the President had not expressly thought it — was that if young Israelis “do it,” if they “create the change they want to see,” what they create will be a force for good. He assumed without saying it that the voices they would raise would be voices for peace. He assumed without saying it that Israeli hopes are hopes for peace. And he is right, although it should be said that hopes for peace reside all along the Israeli political spectrum. Those of the right want peace no less than those of the left; they just have different levels of skepticism.

But what if it is not peace in the hearts of the people, but something malign?

Mr. Obama referenced his Cairo speech to the Israelis:

Four years ago, I stood in Cairo in front of an audience of young people. Politically, religiously, they must seem a world away. But the things they want — they’re not so different from you. The ability to make their own decisions; to get an education and a good job; to worship God in their own way; to get married and have a family. The same is true of the young Palestinians that I met in Ramallah this morning, and of young Palestinians who yearn for a better life in Gaza. That is where peace begins — not just in the plans of leaders, but in the hearts of people.

Certainly the beginning of the Arab uprising in Tunis and in Tahrir Square was focused on jobs and justice (although not on “peace” with Israel or anyone else). But the result was not the flowering of education, work and peaceful relations. It was the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood, violence and the collapse of the Egyptian economy. And clearly many of the Brotherhood’s supporters are young Egyptians. Intolerance for Egypt’s Coptic citizens and the increasing violence in several cities attest to the dangers of calling for changes in or of government. Without wanting a return to the repression of the old government, it is safe to say that the revolution did not bring forth a better one.

Egypt Ignoring Destruction of Huge Archaeological Site

Monday, March 11th, 2013

The Muslim Brotherhood regime is ignoring the “systematic” destruction of Antonopoulos, one of Egypt’s biggest archaeological sites, the Egypt Independent reported Monday.

Monica Hanna, a researcher with the University of Humboldt in Berlin, told the newspaper that information she received from archaeologists working at the site, also known as Sheikh Abada, revealed that bulldozers have leveled an area near Ramses II temple and that the northwestern corner of the walled city has been bulldozed and for agricultural use.

The site is being “destroyed systematically” by residents amid total neglect of the site by the government, they added.

Antonopoulos, which includes archeological finds dating from the pre-dynastic period, the Middle and Modern Kingdoms, and the Ptolemaic period.

The site became famous during the Roman era after Emperor Hadrian established a huge Roman-style city named Antonio Polis, which flourished after the age of Hadrian.

Reports last December revealed that residents demolished a large area of the ancient ruins and cemeteries at Antonopoulos, looted the site and then prepared the ground for planting.

Massive destruction at Egypt’s archaeologist sites was rampant during the uprising against former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, and demonstrators in Tahrir Square broke into the country’s national museum.

Hanna warned, ”We are losing the archaeological sites forever. If a home is built, the state can later remove it and retrieve the land. But once the dead are buried, it is impossible to do so. ”

She told the newspaper that residents often build cemeteries on archaeological sites as a cover to dig up and loot antiquities.

Eighth Plague – Locusts – Invade Israel

Monday, March 4th, 2013

A swarm of several thousands locusts that descended on Egypt began to cross into southern Israel Monday night, but agricultural officials said that pesticides will limit the damage.

A small swarm of the destructive cousin to the grasshopper was discovered on the Israeli side of the border with Egypt for the first time in eight years. They are expected to be exterminated Monday night or early Tuesday morning, Ynet reported.

Egypt has suffered millions of dollars in crop damage from more than 30 million locusts that swarmed over parts of Egypt, including Cairo and Giza.

Locusts were the eighth plague that God set on ancient Egypt prior to the freedom of Jews on the Passover, which this year begins in three weeks.

Israel On ‘Locust Alert’

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Israel’s Agriculture Ministry set up an emergency hotline Monday and has asked citizens to immediately report any sightings of locusts in order to prevent an outbreak of the destructive insects that have invaded Egypt.

Swarms of locusts have landed on crops in Egypt, causing widespread devastation, but the government claims it has eradicated 95 percent of them.

Small numbers of locusts were seen on Monday above NasrCity, Cairo Stadium, and CairoInternationalAirport, according to a ministry statement released late Sunday and quoted by the government news agency MENA.

Several residents n Egypt burned tires to disperse the swarms.

Egypt Teeters on Bankruptcy, Promises Reforms and Gets US Money

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry carried his “cash for promises” plan to Egypt on Sunday, granting the stumbling Muslim Brotherhood regime $190 million immediately following Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi’s “promises” to carry out economic and political reforms.

The money is part of $450 million commitment by the Obama administration to help out the regime, whose economy is in shambles two years after the Arab Spring rebellion resulted in the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

Kerry explained that Cairo needs the money now because of the country’s “extreme needs” and that Mori’s promises to enact reforms, which he promised to do when elected last year. Instead, he tried to usurp even more power for himself while the post-Mubarak economy disintegrated.

The new Secretary of State is outdoing his predecessors in his optimism. He said that the American government also is setting up a separate $60 million funds for direct support to Egyptian businessmen and young people.

Morsi’s promises will satisfy conditions for a $4.8 billion in loans from the International Monetary Fund loans, according to Kerry. Two of those conditions are to raise taxes and reduced energy subsidies.

With parliamentary elections coming up in April, those moves would infuriate an already angry public.

The loans are considered to be a seal of approval that Egypt is on the way to recovery.

Kerry has called his 11-day junket to nine countries a “listening tour.” and said in Cairo, “I emphasize again, as strongly as I can, we’re not here to interfere, I’m here to listen.”

However, not everyone wants to talk to Kerry. Several opposition parties refused to meet with hymn because of the Obama administration’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood regime. Even before the regime took over, President Barack Obama broke precedent by sending American officials, including then-Senator Kerry, to meet with Muslim Brotherhood officials, who formerly had been blackballed.

Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Amr welcomed Kerry as “friend” and said Egypt has certain expectations from the United States, such as to make sure that to “rid the Middle East area from nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction in genera.” That is diplomatic language for forcing Israel to own up to its nuclear capacity and to surrender them – at the same Iran is playing for time in its race for a nuclear weapon, which presumably would be aimed at Israel.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/egypt-teeters-on-bankruptcy-promises-reforms-and-gets-us-money/2013/03/03/

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