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October 23, 2014 / 29 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Christine Quinn’

Election Eve Poll Gives De Blasio Possible First-Round Victory

Monday, September 9th, 2013

Bill de Blasio has turned around the election polls one day before the real vote and has a chance to win Tuesday’s election without a run-off, according to the new and last pre-elections survey conducted by Quinnipiac University.

De Blasio won 39 percent of the respondents’ support, one percent point short of the minimum 40 percent to avoid a second round. In number two place is Bill Thompson, with 25 percent, followed by former front runner Christine Quinn, with only 18 percent.

A Quinnipiac poll last week gave de Blasio 43 percent, and Thompson appeared to have won more backing at de Blasio’s expense in the election eve survey.

Anthony Weiner hardly ranks a mention, and former governor Eliot Spitzer is far behind Scott Stringer in the race for comptroller. Stringer has a seven-point percent lead.

Weiner in Poll is Toast But He’s Still Drinking His Own Kool-Aid

Monday, September 9th, 2013

In a Wall Street Journal-NBC 4 New York-Marist poll taken on Sunday, September 8, of New Yorkers about who they will select as their next mayor, there is a message for Anthony Weiner: You are toast.

In New York speak, it’s “Geddouddaheyah!”

Tuesday’s primary looks to be a cakewalk for Bill De Blasio who has the support of 36 percent of Democrats who are likely to vote.  According to the poll, de Blasio is leading among women, blacks, whites, Latinos, Jews, Catholics and in each of the city’s five boroughs.

In a tie for second and third places are Christine Quinn – the speaker of the New York City Council – who was in the lead for most of the race, and Bill Thompson, a former city comptroller.  Quinn and Thompson each polled at about 20 percent.

In fourth is disgraced former congressman Anthony Weiner, who had been polling at the top until word was released that Weiner continued sending sexually provocative texts to women not his wife even after he was forced to resign from congress for that same misbehavior. Weiner came out in the poll with support from seven percent of likely New York City voters, and former city comptroller John Liu is in last place with 5 percent.

But in the video at the end of this article, you can get a peek at an interview Weiner did for NBC’s Meet the Press which will air on Monday, September 9, in which Weiner said he still believes he will be the next mayor of New York City.

Speaking of former New York state politicians who had to leave their high-powered positions because of sex scandals, former Gov. Eliot Spitzer is actually in a close race with his opponent.

Spitzer held a sizable lead over Manhattan borough president Scott Stringer for most of the race.  But according to Sunday’s poll, the two are virtually neck and neck, with Spitzer at 47 percent and Stringer with 45 percent, which is within the margin of error.

And here’s that clip from NBCNews.com in which Anthony Weiner tells NBC’s Savannah Guthrie that he will be New York City’s next mayor:

Weiner’s Disgrace Boosts De Blasio in Pre-Election Polls

Sunday, August 18th, 2013

Anthony Weiner’s entry in the race for New York City’s next mayor hurt the chances of Bill de Blasio, but the rapid tumble in Weiner’s ratings have turned things around for the liberal de Blasio, the city’s public advocate.

“When Weiner entered the race, de Blasio was the most hurt, since they were both outer borough candidates appealing to the same progressive voters,” Jeanne Zaino, a New York University political science professor, told the Gothamist. “Those people have now turned to him.”

De Blasio’s popularity doubled in the past four weeks, according to last week’s Quinnipiac University poll, and now is a virtual tie with City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

Weiner, who a month ago was in first place, now is in fourth. Ex-comptroller Bill Thompson, who has been endorsed by Assemblyman Dov Hikind, is in third place.

Weiner’s ‘Nazi Card’ Might Cost Him the Game

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Anthony Weiner played the “Nazi card” to run down New York City’s “stop and frisk” policy, but he violated an unwritten political law not to invoke Nazi policies in unrelated issues.

The so-far unstoppable Weiner campaigned in Staten Island Sunday and spoke to black congregants at a church, where he said, “Last year, more than 700,000 in New York were stopped — the overwhelming majority of them were young men of color. Ninety-seven percent of them did nothing wrong…. Well, you can have 100 percent statistical reduction in crime if you stop everybody.

“You could have 1938 Germany, because everyone has to show their papers.”

That was one step over the red line for some Jews.

State Sen. Simcha Felder, who represents largely Orthodox communities in South Brooklyn, was quoted by the New York Post as saying, “His comments were shocking and disgraceful . . . [and] he should apologize. Anyone who uses the Holocaust frivolously diminishes the tragedy that occurred. Weiner clearly stepped over the line.”

Weiner is on a hot streak in the polls, with the latest Quinnipiac University survey giving him a three-point lead over City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

Although the lead is small, it continues a trend in favor of Weiner, who scored a surprising virtual tie with Quinn in the previous poll.

Jewish Press correspondent,Jacob Kornbluh writing on an election blog this week, quoted the Guardian’s Harry Enten as writing, “For the first time in the campaign, one can easily paint a picture that would have Weiner winning both the primary and the runoff. Weiner leads by 25% to 22% over in the Quinnipiac survey released on Monday.

“It’s not the top line, however, that should make Weiner smile. It’s the fact that Quinn is in her weakest position yet against Weiner for the runoff, which will be held if no candidate reaches a threshold of 40% in the first round….

“I would guess that Weiner is probably ahead in a runoff against an opponent who is actually more disliked than he is.”

And then came the Nazi statement, which was made one day after George Zimmerman was acquitted of shooting and killing black teenage Trayvon Martin.

Weiner’s spokeswoman Barbara Morgan went on the defensive and said, “The context of the reference was the argument made by some that stopping innocent citizens was an acceptable cost for public safety. He clearly was not equating 1938 Nazi Germany to New York City.”

Weiner has gotten away with a lot in this campaign. He has skillfully dealt with the sexting scandal.

He has come out four-square against calling Israel an occupier, a popular stand with most Orthodox Jewish voters and hardly an issue that matters in New York City day-to-day operations.

But his fast mouth may have gone into one gear too high by invoking the Nazis into the election.

Politicians have learned the hard way that playing the Nazi card does not work with local issues, such as the ”stop and frisk” policy.

Weiner Looks Like a Winner in the Polls

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Anthony Weiner is leading the pack in a new Quinnipiac University poll released on Monday, with a three percentage point lead over City Council Speaker Christine Quinn. His 25 percent support still is far less than the 40 percent needed to prevent a run-off vote after the primaries elections in early September.

The same poll shows that former Comptroller Bill Thompson’s support for mayor dropped to 11 percent.

Former Gov. Eliot Spitzer also is on top for comptroller, with a solid 15-point lead over  Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer 48 percent to 33 percent.

Pollster Maurice Carroll said in a statement, “Notoriety has earned the ‘Tabloid Twins,’ former Gov. Eliot Spitzer as Client 9 and former Congressman Anthony (Tweets) Weiner, good initial numbers in the polls. Whether those numbers hold up in the real poll on Primary Election Day is the big question.”

In Email to JTA Quinn Says West Bank ‘Disputed Territory’

Friday, July 12th, 2013

New York City mayoral candidate Christine Quinn considers the West Bank “disputed territory” and said she would advocate for Israeli-Palestinian negotiations.

The comment, made in an email to JTA in response to a question at an Orthodox Union event Wednesday, comes two weeks after one of Quinn’s rivals in the race, former Rep. Anthony Weiner, stirred controversy with his comments on the status of the West Bank.

“Chris believes the West Bank is a disputed territory and that the Israelis and Palestinians must sit down and negotiate a solution,” said a spokesman for Quinn, the speaker of the New York City Council. “As Mayor, Chris will use the bully pulpit of the office and everything she can to urge the two sides to sit and negotiate a peaceful resolution of the conflict through the establishment of two states for two peoples that ensures safety and security for the State of Israel.”

Quinn’s position runs counter to that of the U.S. government, which considers the West Bank Israel-occupied territory.

The distinction is significant to both Israelis and Palestinians. “Disputed” suggests that the Palestinians have no more right to the territory than Israel, which captured the land from Jordan in the 1967 Six-Day War. “Occupied” suggests that it is Palestinian territory occupied by Israel. Successive U.S. administrations have opposed Israeli Jewish settlement construction in the West Bank as unlawful and obstructive to a two-state solution.

In late June, Weiner was asked whether he considers the West Bank occupied territory. He said, “The status of that area is left to be decided by the people who are there.” Asked to clarify, Weiner said, “There are disagreements about what constitutes the West Bank.”

Quinn also has said the United States must recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

At the O.U. event Wednesday, Quinn also talked about her positions on issues relating to Jewish day schools, saying she supports better security for schools, enhanced special education programs and fewer administrative hearings for parents of special education students.

Quinn also said she wants to eliminate hate crimes in New York.

“It’s not acceptable that mezuzahs were burned in Williamsburg or that a man in Greenwhich Village was killed because he was gay,” said Quinn, who is gay. “I want to make New York City the first hate crime free city.”

Thompson Might Push Quinn Out of Runoff Contest Vs. Weiner

Friday, June 28th, 2013

A few weeks ago, I had a conversation with a staunch supporter of Christine Quinn who asked me to be frank in assessing Ms. Quinn’s chances of winning the race for mayor. “To be honest, I will have to wait for the next Marist poll to see whether her poll numbers stay at 24 percent or move ahead, or they continue to slide down towards 20 percent,” I responded.

My explanation was: Since Ms. Quinn has dropped from her peak at 38 percent in January to 24 in May, Weiner’s presence as a dominant figure in the race will determine what Christine Quinn’s ceiling and floor numbers are. “If Weiner moves up at the expense of Quinn, she’s in trouble, whereas if Weiner’s standing stays still or increases at the expense of the two Bills, then the race remains wide open,” I added.

Last night, after reviewing the poll data, I recalled my assessment to my friend and another operative and all I could imagine on the other side of the phone line was a head nodding in dismay.

This morning, I came across an identical assessment, based on the May Marist Poll prior to Tuesday night’s poll, by Harry J. Enten in the UK’s Guardian. “The big news is that the poll greatly upsets the general consensus that Quinn is a near lock to make the runoff. Quinn is at her weakest point in the past year,” he writes. “Quinn’s favorable numbers have, if you believe Quinnipiac, been falling among Democrats all year. She had a 64% favorable rating in January, 61% in February, 52% by late April, and will likely have 50% by late May.. What’s important to note here is that when controlling for pollsters, Quinn’s favorables have been falling steadily.”

More serious than just the tumbling favorables, Quinn’s current support is soft. In the Marist poll, only 30% of her voters strongly support her. In contrast, 39% of the overall electorate supports some candidate strongly, meaning Quinn has unusually dispassionate support. Weiner, meanwhile, who some thought was an anomaly of pure name recognition, has a far more fervent support: 43% of Weiner’s voters say they are strongly behind him.. The racial makeup of Quinn’s coalition suggests she’ll have further trouble. I’ve long argued that Quinn’s coalition is a house of cards built on support from minority voters, and that the strategy doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. She’s undermined by her own history, as when she blocked paid sick leave for an extended period, and she’s taken heat from minority groups for her position on stop-and-frisk. Quinn’s largely seen as something of an heir to the mayoralty of Mike Bloomberg, whose approval rating is at 49% among Democrats, but only at 42% among Latinos and 40% among African Americans. Quinn, on the other hand, scores 22% among white voters, 31% among Latinos and 26% among African Americans.

Thus, Enden confidently predicts: “I’m betting Bill Thompson will make the runoff. Per my math, a little less than half of Thompson’s supporters are with him strongly – far ahead of Quinn. He’s also a black candidate in a primary that is going to be near 30% African American, and New York City mayoral elections tend to break on ethnic and racial lines.. Bill Thompson is likely going to do better than polls suggest, and most of his untapped support is likely to come at Christine Quinn’s expense. Therefore, Quinn’s 24% may actually be closer to the ceiling than the floor of her support.”

“Given that Weiner’s support has been surprisingly strong, I don’t expect his numbers to fall much. That means that the first round of voting could result in a near tie between Quinn, Thompson and Weiner. In that scenario, Quinn could end up with the short end of the stick, and not in the runoff at all,” Enten concludes.

With last night’s poll showing Quinn’s drop in the polls is yet to be stopped, Enten’s bet and my assessment are vindicated, with the remaining weeks still to determine whether it is Weiner vs. Quinn, Thompson vs. Quinn or rather the shock of all times – Weiner vs. Thompson, in the runoff.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/thompson-might-push-quinn-out-of-runoff-contest-vs-weiner/2013/06/28/

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