web analytics
December 5, 2016 / 5 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘presidential’

CNN Poll: Debate Watchers Give Ryan Slight Edge in VP Debate

Friday, October 12th, 2012

CNN reported that a CNN/ORC International nationwide poll found 48% of voters who watched the vice presidential debate Thursday thought Congressman Paul Ryan won, awhile 44% gave the win to Vice President Joe Biden.

Half of the debate watchers in the survey said the encounter didn’t make them more likely to vote for either of the tickets, 28% said it made them favor Romney, 21% said it made them choose Obama.

As to viewer expectations: 55% said Biden did better than expected, and 51% said Ryan did better than expected.

A CBS News poll of uncommitted voters who watched the debate favored Biden over Ryan by a 50%-31% margin. Roughly 10% of the debate audience were uncommitted.

Jewish Press News Briefs

In Battleground State Ohio, Jewish Voters Favoring Obama According to AJC Poll

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

An American Jewish Committee survey of Jewish voters in Ohio, a battleground state, has the community favoring President Obama in similar numbers to polls elsewhere.

The survey released Wednesday by the AJC has Ohio’s Jews favoring Obama 64 percent to 29 percent for Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate.

With a 6.4 percent margin of error, the numbers are commensurate with two other AJC polls last month that had Obama beating Romney 69 to 25 percent among Florida Jewish voters and 65 to 24 nationally.

As in those polls, the economy and health care topped voters’ concerns.

The phone survey of 238 registered Jewish voters in Ohio was conducted Sept. 13-30 by QEV Analytics.

The survey does not take into account any changes resulting from the recent presidential debate between Obama and Romney.

Malkah Fleisher contributed to this report

JTA

Planned August 24 Mass Protest to Impeach Morsy, Terminate Muslim Brotherhood

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

“Egypt Independent” reports that debate continued Wednesday among political groups and activists over the merits of the planned August 24 protest against the Muslim Brotherhood and President Mohamed Morsy.

Former MPs Mohamed Abou Hamed and Mostafa Bakry, as well as anti-Brotherhood media host Tawfiq Okasha, had called for protests outside the group’s headquarters in Moqattam, a suburb in southeastern Cairo, and in front of the presidential palace. The protests are to demand Morsy’s impeachment and the end of the Brotherhood’s political domination.

Interior Minister Ahmed Gamal Eddin said Wednesday that the ministry respects all rights and freedoms, especially the right to peaceful protest.

Except that the Union of Revolutionary Youth, a group of political activists, declared Wednesday that the protest was called for by supporters of former Prime Minister and losing presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq as a counter-revolutionary ploy, and accused the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces of backing the protest.

The group added that it recognizes Morsy as the legitimately elected president, despite political disagreements with the Brotherhood and the Freedom and Justice Party.

URY spokesperson Tamer al-Qady did agree publicly, however, that it is unacceptable to issue a religious edict ordering the protesters to be killed, referring to a recent statement by Al-Azhar official Sheikh Hashem Islam, who was quoted by press reports as urging citizens to fight against the August 24 demonstrators to the death.

The statement also stressed the right to peaceful protest, while denouncing calls to burn Brotherhood offices.

The Coalition of Coptic Egypt has announced that it will participate in the protest. In a statement Wednesday, the groups said that it will protest to stress the goals of the revolution and stress the preservation of the secular state, rather than to demand Morsy’s impeachment. It added that it would also oppose the domination of state institutions by one political ideology.

The Hayat Party, which has yet to gain official recognition and is led by Coptic activist Mikel Mounir, also announced its participation, saying it would attend the demonstrations to inform the Brotherhood that “the country is not theirs alone.”

Jewish Press Staff

Egyptian PM Vehicle Attacked at Funeral for Sinai Dead, Morsy Is No Show

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

The website Egypt Independent reported Tuesday that Prime Minister Hesham Qandil’s car was vandalized by angry mourners during the funeral of the 16 Egyptian officers who were killed by Palestinian terrorists Sunday afternoon.

The military funeral began at the Unknown Soldier Monument after noon prayers. Eyewitnesses said that as soon as Qandil arrived at the monument, a large number of people attacked his vehicle, lifted their shoes to his face, and chanted putdowns. The car’s windshield was damaged, and the minister’s guards were forced to take a different route to avoid further assaults.

Egyptian president Mohamed Morsy was scheduled to attend the funeral but did not appear.

Several other figures attended, including Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, members of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, and Grand Sheikh of Al-Azhar Ahmed al-Tayyeb, as well as former presidential candidates Hamdeen Sabbahi, Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh, and Amr Moussa. The Salafi Nour Party and the Salafi Dawah were also represented at the funeral.

Morsy was scheduled to visit the seven guards who were injured in the attack afterward.

Jewish Press News Briefs

More than 20,000 Londoners Hold Munich Moment of Silence

Friday, July 27th, 2012

More than 20,000 people in various venues in London attended the British Zionist Federation’s “Minute for Munich” program that was promoted via social media.

A short memorial service at the Israeli Embassy that was organized by the Zionist Federation was streamed live online Friday, according to the London Jewish Chronicle.

About 200 people marked the Minute for Munich in Trafalgar Square, reciting memorial prayers and lighting memorial candles. Afterwards, they waved British and Israeli flags in front of media covering the event.

“The British Jewish community is showing its solidarity with our brothers and sisters in Israel,” the British Israel Coalition’s Ari Soffer told the crowd, according to the Chronicle. “We should not allow this tragedy to go uncommemorated. This is a time to show our respect and remember the dead.”

The families of the victims of the 1972 Munich massacre, in which 11 Israeli Olympics athletes and coaches were murdered by Palestinian terrorists, have mounted a global campaign to get the International Olympic Committee to hold an official moment of silence at the Games. The IOC continues to reject the call, despite its being endorsed by President Obama, GOP presumptive presidential nominee Mitt Romney, the U.S. Senate, the German Bundestag, the Canadian and Australian parliaments, about 50 members of the British Parliament, the Israeli government and Jewish organizations worldwide.

JTA

Choice to Make Love, Not War

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Alternative peace activist Baruch Widen joins Managing Editor of Jewish Press Online,Yishai Fleisher,. Together, they talk about the results of the Presidential election in Egypt and how these results will affect the relationship between Israel and Egypt. Yishai ends the segment by talking about difficulties he personally has faced living among Arabs and how they often make the choice to hate rather than love both Jews and each other.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Moshe Herman

Few Doubts on Whom Jews Should Pray for to Win Egyptian Runoff Election

Friday, June 15th, 2012

First, in case your Internet was off these past couple of days, Egypt’s High Constitutional Court on Thursday ruled that the Political Disenfranchisement Law was unconstitutional. The court also found the election of one third of parliamentary seats, reserved for individual candidates, unconstitutional. The reason: instead of being genuinely independent, those candidates were heavily affiliated with religious parties.

Then Maher Sami, deputy head of Egypt’s High Constitutional Court, announced that Thursday’s court verdict means that both houses of Egypt’s parliament—the People’s Assembly and the consultative Shura Council—will be dissolved.

So these are not easy, stable times for Israel’s neighbor to the south-west.

But the runoff presidential election between former prime minister Ahmed Shafiq and Freedom and Justice Party leader Mohamed Mursi is still going ahead as planned, on Saturday and Sunday.

And so, as interested parties, we must ask ourselves, which of the two candidates should we say a Mi Sh’Beirach for, or at least endorse in our hearts during prayer this coming Shabbat.

The details of this article were culled from the English language versions of the Arab press, and so, by definition, are already kind of biased. But you get what you can, and you hope that our Arab analysts out there will quickly and surely add a deeper dimension to this note.

Mohamed Mursi is a professor of Engineering. He served as member of parliament until 2005 and was head of the Muslim Brotherhood parliamentary blocback then. He is a top ranking Muslim Brothers official, who came in first in the first round of the presidential elections, with 5,764,952 votes, or 24.78 percent.

Ahmed Shafiq is a lieutenant-general in the army, former minister of civil aviation, and Mubarak’s last prime minister. He resigned after Mubarak stepped down. He finished second in the presidential election first round, with 5,505,327 votes, or 23.66 percent.

Concerns about Mursi are that he will be controlled by the Muslim Brotherhood leadership. He will likely increase the Brotherhood’s clerics’ dominance over all branches of the state, Iran Revolution style. He supports decriminalizing female circumcision, and will not be a friend of career women. There are fears that he will not be an effective bulwark against the extremist SCAF. And, judging by the Brotherhood’s disappointing performance in parliament, Mursi’s ability to rule effectively in a democracy has come under question as well.

Last week, Mursi declared at a Cairo University campaign rally: “The Quran is our constitution, the Prophet is our leader, jihad is our path, and martyrdom in the service of God is our goal. We shall enforce Islamic Sharia, and shall accept no alternative to it.”

Shafiq, on the other hand, appears to be a Western-style democrat – at least compared to Mursi. He favors of an inclusive and progressive civil state, and is against the politicizing of religion. If he wins, he has both the temperament and the experience of suppressing possible subversion on the part of the Brotherhood. And, despite his questionable ties with the Mubarak regime, Egyptian secular revolutionaries will fair much better following a Shafiq victory, because it would give secular parties time to establish themselves and grow politically – if the Brotherhood wins, the secularists will be targetted. And, naturally, economically, Egyptians will benefit greatly from a liberal-leaning presidency.

And Shafiq would probably maintain some  continuity in Egypt’s foreign policy, including its tenuous peace with Israel. When speaking about Egypt’s 1979 peace treaty with Israel, he said, “I object to Israel’s current actions, but I am a man who honors past agreements”.

So, when you daven in shul this Shabbat and you happen to touch on Egypt’s political future, cast your spiritual vote for Ahmed Shafiq.

But don’t tell your Egyptian friends, because that would be his kiss of death…

Yori Yanover

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/few-doubts-on-whom-jews-should-pray-for-to-win-egyptian-runoff-election/2012/06/15/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: