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Livni, Bennett Back Bill to Pretend Jews Need Only One Chief Rabbi

The idea of “One Rabbi for One People” sounds lovely, but can Jews really get along with each other if they have nothing to argue about?
Two rabbis for two Jewish communities: Israel's new chief rabbis,  Sephardi Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef (R) and Ashkenazi Rabbi David Lau.

Two rabbis for two Jewish communities: Israel's new chief rabbis, Sephardi Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef (R) and Ashkenazi Rabbi David Lau.

Justice Minister Tzipi Livni and Jewish Home chairman and Minister for Religious Affairs Naftali Bennett unveiled the outline Monday morning of their new bill to eliminate the system of a two-headed Chief Rabbinate and replace it with “one rabbi for one people.”

Modern Israel always has had two chief rabbis, one for the Ashkenazi community and one for the Sephardi community. Each community has vastly different traditions and different rulings on Jewish laws. Within each community there are several sub-cultures. There are “Yechi” Ashkenazi Jews. There are many different Chassidic sects, and there are “Litvak,” Misnagim,” Lubavitch-Chabad, Ger, Neturei Karta, Vishnitz and a host of others.

In Israel, there is no lack of different synagogues representing the origin of their worshippers’ families. There are Iraqi, Iranian (Parsi), Egyptian and Yemenite synagogues, to mention a few.

Livni, who is secular, and Bennett, who is modern Orthodox, each believe that one chief rabbi is enough for everyone,

Their bill would clear the way for a single chief rabbi in 10 years, when the next election will take place. Three months ago, Haredi Rabbi David Lau defeated national religious Rabbi David Stav to head the Ashkenazi rabbinate. Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef was elected Chief Sephardi Rabbi.

Both of the new chief rabbis are sons of two of the most popular men ever to serve as chief rabbi – Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau and the late Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, who was highly controversial among those outside of Sephardi circles. Each man is a legend, and the thought of a single chief rabbi would have been unthinkable under their charismatic leadership.

Livni and Bennett insist they are not retrying to blur the lines of tradition. A single rabbi undoubtedly would save money, but finance is not part of their agenda.

“There is one prime minister, one president, one supreme court and one IDF Chief of Staff,” Livni said. The time has come that there should be one rabbi for one people, The time has some that Israel has one chief rabbi to unite all segments of Israeli society, [The time has come for] a rabbinate that will serve all religious sectors instead of a county that retains the separation of communities. It is possible to respect tradition in the house without separating religious authority,” she said.

Bennett chimed in, “This [bill] is an important step that symbolizes unity. The appointment of one rabbi is one of those subjects that raises the question, ‘Why wasn’t it done sooner?’ Today, when an Ashkenazi and Sephardi marry, there not two rabbis. Today, there is one army, and there are no separate positions for Ashkenazim or Sephardim.”

The idea sound so nice. All of the People of Israel will unite together, holding hands, dancing the hora and embracing each other with whole-hearted acceptance as a person and not as a “Sephardi” or “Ashkenazi.” Peace and love all wrapped up in a stewing pot of melted Jews.

Judaism has survived and blossomed since the 12 Tribes of Yaakov (Jacob) because of their unity as Jews and differences of character, personality and customs.

“One rabbi for one people” would discourage diversity. Obviously, a single chief rabbi would be an expert in different customs and would not issue a ruling that would violate a community’s customs. Sephardim would not be told to give up “kitniyot” for Passover and Ashkenazim would not start rising before dawn to recite Selichot prayers during the entire Hebrew month of Elul before Rosh HaShanah.

Regardless of whatever merits there may be to the bill, and despite probable enthusiasm from Israel’s leading secular media, the bill will have tough going.

Overcoming centuries of tradition in one Knesset session is a bit too much for Livni, the darling of dwindling leftist-center secular Israelis who did not vote for Yair Lapid and a villain to national religious Jews, including Bennett except for the one-rabbi bill. Bennett is riding a wave of secular support for his Jewish Home party, the inheritor of the old Mafdal crowd.

If the bill gets to the Knesset floor, it will provide lots of colorful copy for journalists. Shas will go berserk, and the United Torah Judaism party of Haredi Ashkenazi Jews will be able to sue Bennett for Livni for causing them a collective heart attack, God forbid.

There almost certainly are enough “secular” Knesset Members who are too deeply rooted in Jewish tradition to support a merger that is more likely to tear apart the People of Israel rather than unite it.

Arguments and differences of opinion are what made the Talmud so great.

Can anyone imagine Jews not arguing about whether the single chief rabbi should be Sephardi or Ashkenazi.

And if they didn’t argue, how could the Jewish people survive?

About the Author: Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu is a graduate in journalism and economics from The George Washington University. He has worked as a cub reporter in rural Virginia and as senior copy editor for major Canadian metropolitan dailies. Tzvi wrote for Arutz Sheva for several years before joining the Jewish Press.


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5 Responses to “Livni, Bennett Back Bill to Pretend Jews Need Only One Chief Rabbi”

  1. How about simply abolishing the post of Chief Rabbi altogether. The concept of a Chief Rabbi for the country is not even a Jewish concept. It was a creation of the British. In the UK, the Church of England is official state church. Other religions are free to operate and it has become the practice to have a leader in the UK to represent minority faiths. Some have a leader built in – the Catholics are represented by the senior member of the hierarchy in the UK. Jews had no such thing so this post of Chief Rabbi was invented in the UK and exported to British colonies and territories. When Israel gained independence, the Chief Rabbi system was maintained. However it was not ordained from Sinai. This post has become a political football and a lightning rod for conflict over differences in how one lives as a Jew etc. Time to get rid of this anachronism.

  2. Dan Silagi says:

    Jews don't need any chief rabbis. My great-great uncle was Chief Rabbi of St. Louis. After he died (long before I was born), the City of St. Louis decided they needed Stan Musial much more than they needed a chief rabbi. A wise choice.

  3. Ch Hoffman says:

    One nation
    One set of laws of kashrut
    Leave your Polish customs in Kracow

  4. I'm sefardi and I would support this one-rabbi bill. We must have one minhag in Israel, there is no need to maintain zillions of customs. It is time to create it, a consensus can be found on each issue.

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