web analytics
October 26, 2016 / 24 Tishri, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Friday’

Rebbetzin Devorah, Wife of Lubavitcher Rebbe’s Aide Rabbi Yehuda, Laid to Rest

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Rebbetzin Devorah Krinsky, wife of chief aide to the late Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, passed away on Friday night at the age of 74.

Rebbetzin Devorah returned her soul to its maker after the Friday night Kiddush was recited at her bedside, surrounded by her husband, Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky – who still serves as Chairman of Merkos L’inyonei Chinuch and Machne Israel educational and social services – and their children.

Rebbetzin Devorah’s parents, Rabbi Zev and Etta Kasinetz, provided space for early Lubavitch work from their home in Brooklyn’s Brownsville in the late 1930’s and 40’s, according to an article in Chabad’s COLlive.

She was described by COLlive as the pillar of her home, and a constant partner in the work of her husband.  “Her warmth and humor, her quick wit, practical common sense, and her concern for others complemented her dignified comportment,” the article written on the  occasion of her death said.

Rebbetzin Devorah is survived by Rabbi Yehuda, her children Rabbi Hillel Dovid of Crown Heights, Mrs. Sheine Friedman of Crown Heights, Rabbi Menachem Mendel of Crown Heights, Rabbi Levi of Lubavitch of New Hampshire, Mrs. Chana Futerfas of Crown Heights, Rabbi Shmaya of Crown Heights, and her grandchildren and great grandchildren, as well as her brother Rabbi Moshe Kasinetz, founder of Suburban Torah Center in Livingston, New Jersey.

Rebbetzin Devorah’s funeral took place on Sunday at noon, leaving from Shomrei Hadas Chapels and passing by Lubavitch World Headquarters at 770 Eastern Parkway.  She was laid to rest at the Old Montefiore Cemetery in Queens.

The shiva house is located at 729 Montgomery Street in Brooklyn, and will be open from 11am on Monday through Friday.

COLlive listed prayer times at the home as follows:

Shachris: 8:00, 8:45, 9:30, 10:00

Mincha: 15 Minutes before sunset

Maariv: After nightfall

Those wishing to send condolences to the family are also encouraged to write to krinskyfam@gmail.com.

Malkah Fleisher

Going Home

Sunday, November 25th, 2012

Israeli soldiers were packing up their gear as they leave their staging area near the Gaza border, on the first day of the ceasefire, Friday, November 22, 2012.

This morning the Likud is holding its primaries, to select a list of candidates for the Knesset. I sincerely hope that at least those Likud members who live down south will let their leader, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, know what they think about the shameful way he sold them out.

Netanyahu kicked the can down the street, gaining a few months of quiet, after which it is obvious that these same soldiers will be called back to do the job of suppressing the Hamas violence. But the new ceasefire agreement will make it just a little bit harder for them to do the job.

Thank you, Mr. Prime Minister. We could do much better.

Yori Yanover

Hamas Deploys (Unarmed) Police Along Israeli Border

Sunday, November 25th, 2012

Hamas has begun deploying unarmed policemen along the Israeli border with Gaza.

The initial deployment began east of Khan Yunis, where on Friday, the IDF killed one and wounded around a dozen Gazans who tried to breach the security fence.

The mission of the Hamas policemen is to keep Gazan citizens away from the border with Israel, and the deployment by Hamas was coordinated with the Egyptians.


Jewish Press News Briefs

Hamas Already Repairing Gaza’s Smuggling Tunnels, Preparing for Next War

Friday, November 23rd, 2012

Reuters reported on Friday that the Rafah smuggling tunnels, pummeled by the IAF over 8 days, in an area described as resembling a moonscape, are already being rebuilt.

“As you can see there is complete destruction, the tunnels are all destroyed because of the missiles. We will rebuild them and bring in food, flour lentils and sugar and building material such as cement and metal so that the people can break the siege on Gaza,” Mohamad Omar told Reuters on Friday while his friends were busy clearing up their camp.

A Rafah tunnel that has been bombarded by the IAF will be re-dug this week.

A Rafah tunnel that has been bombarded by the IAF will be re-dug this week.

The Rafah border crossing with Egypt, like the crossings to Israel remained closed to traffic most of the day Friday.

Local workmen said the IAF attacks destroyed more than two-thirds of the cross-border tunnels which are used to bring in cement, fuel, food, and the rockets and mortar shells used against Israeli civilian enclaves only a few miles away.

“We are trying to fix the tunnel in order to return to our normal life which we need the tunnel for work. It costs a lot but what can we do, we have to fix it. For example this tunnel of ours which has been hit it will cost no less that 40 thousand dollars to fix,” Mohamad Aladwan said.

According to Reuters, none of the tunnel workers interviewed said they had handled military materiel, and all of them said they were dedicated to bringing through only harmless consumer goods and medical supplies.

Jewish Press Staff

In Thousands of Israeli Homes, Wives Await Return of Reservist Husbands

Sunday, November 18th, 2012

Since late Thursday night thousands of Israeli reservists have had to say good-bye to their families and answer the call of duty, as ground troops begin mobilizing for Operation Pillar of Defense.

Moriah Helman, 28, and her husband of 6 years Eliyahu, also 28, live with their three children in Talmon, a community northwest of Jerusalem and Ramallah. Eliyahu received his call on Friday morning as Moriah awoke to care for their youngest child, born one month ago.

“Eliyahu was instructed to pack a bag immediately and report to an undisclosed meeting point in a city close to his home. From there, he and his fellow reservists would be taken by bus to receive their equipment and then would be sent on to their destination. Once there, they would undergo a short training session before receiving their order, “ Moriah told Tazpit News Agency.

“Its mostly stressful, frightening” Moriah explains. “If G-d forbid something happens… But there’s no alternative…even with a baby at home and there’s work and life, this is what needs to be done.” The Helman’s oldest child, age five, seems to understand what is going on.

“He’s very proud of his father, and considers him a hero off to save the country and fight the bad guys. He’s seen his father off to the reserves a few times, and every time his dad leaves, his dad comes home. He doesn’t realize that things are different this time around, more dangerous” Moriah points out. ‘There was no way I could tell [Eliyahu] to stay home! says Moriah.

When asked her opinion on the current situation in the south, Moriah doesn’t miss a beat. “If I am not for myself, who will be for me?” she asks, quoting Hillel from the Pirkei Avot.

Maayan Dvorkin-Rynar, 25, also sent her husband off to the reserves, but living within 23 kilometers of Gaza, her routine has been punctuated by rocket attacks for months. Maayan and her husband Harel, 27, live in Kibbutz Massuot Yitzchak. According to Maayan it was clear that Harel would be called.

“Harel serves in a special unit, and is called to reserves at least once a month. Though accustomed to his being called away often, it is still upsetting not having him around. I have my family here on the kibbutz with me, so I have support, but it’s not fun being here alone.”

Because Kibbutz Massuot Yitzchak is in close proximity to Qiryat Malachi, Ashdod and Ashquelon, three cities which have bombarded by rockets since Wednesday, Maayan and her family have been living between sirens and booms. “We do what we can to continue living life as we know it,” she explains.

“I trust Harel that he’ll do his best and I hope that Israel’s operation in Gaza will lead to a significant outcome for the future, one where will no longer have to live under a state of living under constant threat of rocket fire. And Am Yisrael Chai!”

In Haifa, Elisheva’s husband, Avinoam has also been called. When asked if she feels safe living in Haifa, far away from Gaza and it’s rockets, Elisheva says, quite simply, “no place is safe. The south, Tel Aviv, up north, Hashmonaim…no place is safe. We’ll continue living life as we did two days ago…There’s not much I can do.”

Avinoam’s brother-in-law, Ze’ev, serving in the same unit, was also called into the reserves early Friday morning, much to his surprise. “I got the call at 6:45 AM,” he said. Since his release from compulsory service three years ago, this will be his first time serving in the reserves.

His wife Rikki came home from the gym to find her husband packing his bag. “I was pretty emotional, but I tried not to show it, I wanted to stay strong,” she explains. She is comforted by the fact that her husband and brother were called into the same place, and knows that “even if its hard and emotional, he’s doing what he needs to be doing. We’ll pray.” Even though it was difficult to see her husband off, Rikki believes in what he’s been sent to do.

“We believe in our country, this is what out our husbands have got to do to keep us safe.”

Chelsea Mosery Tazpit News Agency

Rockets on Gush Etzion – A Personal Story

Saturday, November 17th, 2012

On Friday night, I was walking to shul with my kids when the air-raid siren went off. I quickly had to debate which was closer, my home or the shul, because there wasn’t much of a particularly safe place in between the two.

To digress for a second, on Friday, Hamas claimed they were going to hit the Knesset in Jerusalem with a rocket. Personally, I didn’t take that threat very seriously, mostly because they were just as likely to hit an Arab village or Al Aqsa, so why would they take that chance?

And out here, in Gush Etzion. Not likely at all. Right?

But still, before hockey practice in the afternoon, the coach made a point of telling all the kids where the closest bomb shelter was. You know… just in case.

Like every Shabbat, I had my security walkie-talkie with me. And when the sirens went off, it started shouting too about the incoming rocket.

This was real.

I decided we were going to try to run home. My wife was there with the newborn along with my mother, and they would need help too.

But little kids can only run so fast, and when it became clear we weren’t going to make it home in a reasonable time, I hid us under a semi-enclosed garage (the building the garage was attached to was unfortunately locked). I wasn’t going to keep us out in the open for much longer. It wasn’t safe.

We got there, as did a few other people, and we waited. And a minute later – “Boom”.

I’ve been through rocket attacks in Lebanon, and during the Gulf War too, so I knew what to expect. But I didn’t know how my kids would react.

My kids couldn’t stop laughing when they heard the explosion in the not far enough away distance!

They apparently practice running to the bomb shelter all the time in school, so they knew what to do, and were excited they could finally do it for real.

We waited another minute, and then rather stupidly, we ran the rest of the way home. Then there was a second, and perhaps fainter boom.

Turns out you are supposed to wait 10 minutes in your safe area, because they fire them in groups. Who knew.

I went back to shul. Alone this time.

Anyway, the parks were pretty empty on Shabbat afternoon, and we kept our kids inside for the rest of the day.

The kids have been making siren sounds all day long and building Lego rockets.

Go figure.



The following was posted on Facebook by Eli Birnbaum

Surreal story from Eli Birnbaum in Tekoa:

Erev Shabbat in Tekoa (like most places) is a contradiction of tension and relief. This time the arrival of Shabbat was accompanied by warning sirens for a missile attack. Surprise and unbelief “Missiles here in the Judean desert?” Before we can really grasp what was happening, there came the resounding boom of an explosion echoing in the hills reflecting the shock in our faces. The security van careens through the streets calling people to find shelter. Within minutes another siren warning. This time prayers are halted . “Quickly under the shul,” someone commands. Within the confusion we grab our children and grandchildren in our arms and climb down to the open area under the synagogue which affords more protection. We all move quickly in the darkening evening finding space on the floor . I hold one of my grandchildren talking to him softly . He thinks it is a great game. We begin to sing and wait for the next boom.

It was at that moment that my son Pinny’s cell phone rings. As a member of a search and rescue team it is not uncommon for him to get calls even on Shabbat. But this call was different “Shabbat Shalom” . It is a familiar voice with a very distinct accent. “ Pinny, its Muhammad, what do I do? What’s happening? I heard your sirens”. There is real panic in his voice.

At first this may not appear to be an abnormal situation, but Muhammad is an acquaintance/friend who happens to live in the Arab village of Tuqua which the army will only enter in large numbers. Pinny quietly explains that we were being rocketed from Gaza and the best thing he could do is to remain in doors and stay away from windows. Muhammad thanks Pinny profusely apologizes for calling on Shabbat “ Shabbat Shalom Pinny – B’Emet todah!”. So this Friday night , a “Palestinian Arab” called a “Jewish Settler” for help regarding a rocket attack from Gaza – Surreal!


Stephen Leavitt

Gush Etzion Hit

Saturday, November 17th, 2012

On Friday evening two rockets hit the Gush Etzion area, south of Jerusalem.

Residents were on their way to synagogue on Friday night, when the sirens went off.

A short time later 2 rockets hit in the Gush Etzion area. No injuries or damage were reported from those strikes.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/gush-etzion-hit/2012/11/17/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: