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December 19, 2014 / 27 Kislev, 5775
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘sukkot’

Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles) Guide for the Perplexed, 2014‏

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

1. Sukkot starts on the 15th day of the Jewish month of Tishrei, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt, the construction of the Holy Tabernacle and the 40 year wandering in the Sinai Desert. Sukkot (סכות), and the Sukkah (סכה), which is a Jewish ritual hut, are named after the first stop of The Exodus – Sukkota (סכותה). The Hebrew root of Sukkah (סכה) is “wholesomeness” and “totality” (סך), the “shelter” of the tabernacle (סכך), “to anoint” (סוך), “divine curtain/shelter” (מסך) and “attentiveness” (סכת).

2. The first recorded 7 day Sukkot celebration was – following the 5th century BCE Cyrus Edict – in Nehemiah 8:17: “And all the congregation of them that were come again out of the captivity made booths, and sat under the booths: for since the days of Joshua the son of Nun (13th-14th century BCE) unto that day had not the children of Israel done so. And there was very great gladness.”

3. Sukkot is the 3rd Jewish holiday – following Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur – in the month of Tishrei, the most significant Jewish month (Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot and Simchat Torah). According to Judaism, the number 3 represents divine wisdom, stability, permanence, integration and peace. Three is the total sum of the basic odd (1) and even (2) numbers. The 3rd day of the Creation was blessed twice; God appeared on Mt. Sinai 3 days following Moses’ ascension to the mountain; there are 3 parts to the Bible, 3 Jewish Patriarchs, 3 pilgrimages to Jerusalem, etc.

4. Sukkot (the Feast of Tabernacles) is the 3rd Jewish pilgrimage, commemorating the post-Exodus forty year wandering in the desert, a holiday of happiness, hope, optimism and harvest. It follows the pilgrimage of Passover – the holiday of liberty, the birth of the Jewish nation and spring, and the pilgrimage of Shavou’ot (Pentecost) – the holiday of the Torah and national maturity/responsibility.

5. Columbus Day is celebrated around Sukkot. According to “Columbus Then and Now <http://send.hadavars.com/lt.php?c=31138&m=29462&nl=2096&s=212f71f4a85b8a896e1efb82435a7f0a&lid=278221&l=-http–books.google.co.il/books–Q-id–E-BR6Ek48GgzEC–A-pg–E-PA268–A-lpg–E-PA268–A-dq–E-columbus–PL-then–PL-and–PL-now–PL-hoshana–PL-raba–A-source–E-bl–A-ots–E-oLa0ll4Ito–A-sig–E-uANIz5-1KMwcLwoSO-_FHwb27Gw–A-hl–E-iw–A-sa–E-X–A-ei–E-n6pmUP_GIaqj0QWbh4CQAw–A-ved–E-0CCAQ6AEwAA–PND-v=onepage&q=columbus%20then%20and%20now%20hoshana%20raba&f=false> ” (Miles Davidson, 1997, p. 268), Columbus arrived in America on Friday afternoon, October 12, 1492, the 21st day of the Jewish month of Tishrei, the Jewish year 5235, the 7th day of Sukkot, Hosha’na’ Rabbah, which is a day of universal deliverance and miracles. Hosha’ (הושע) is the Hebrew word for “deliverance” and Na’ (נא) is the Hebrew word for “please.” The numerical value of Na’ is 51, which corresponds to the celebration of Hosha’na’ Rabbah on the 51st day following Moses’ ascension to Mt. Sinai.

6. Sukkot is a universal holiday, inviting all peoples to come on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, as expressed in the reading (Haftarah) of Zechariah 14: 16-19 on Sukkot’s first day. It is a holiday of peace – the Sukkah of Shalom (שלום). Shalom is one of the names of God. Shalem (שלם) – wholesome and complete in Hebrew – is one of the names of Jerusalem (Salem). According to Sukkah tractate of the Mishnah (the oral Torah), the 70 sacrificial bulls of Sukkot represent the pilgrimage of 70 nations to Jerusalem; a demonstration of universal solidarity and comity.

7. The Sukkah symbolizes the Chuppah – the Jewish wedding canopy – and the renewed vows between God and the Jewish People. While Yom Kippur represents God’s forgiveness of the Golden Calf Sin, Sukkot represents the reinstatement of Divine Providence over the Jewish People. Sukkot is called Zman Simchatenou – time of our joy – and mandates Jews to rejoice (והיית אך שמח). The numerical value of the Hebrew word for “mandates” – “ach” אך – is 21, which is the number of days between Rosh Hashanah and the end of Sukkot.

Moving on to Sukkos

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Not everyone wants to wait until after Yom Kippur to start building their Sukkah.

This Sukkah is being built in Kfar Etzion.

Chag Sameach.

We’ll Be Back Saturday Night

Friday, September 27th, 2013

For those of us in Israel, it’s Isru Chag (the day after the holidays, when we pack up our Succahs, and finally get to relax after such a busy holiday).

For those still stuck in Galus (the Diapora), it’s still Yom Tov (holiday) so you shouldn’t be reading this anyway.

So – unless, there’s major breaking news today, we’ll see you on Motzei Shabbos.

On Sunday, we’ll be discussing, in depth,  the offensive offensives that occurred at the UN.

 

Police Bar Jews from Holiday Visit to Temple Mount

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Jerusalem police once again have prohibited Jews from visiting the Temple Mount because of security officials’ unintended admission that they cannot or do not want to deal with violent Arabs.

Officially, police say that they blocked the planned visit of hundreds of Jews to the holy site on Tuesday, the sixth day of the Sukkot holiday, because of intelligence information that Arab protesters would be violently upset, which is par for the course when Jews try to ascend the Temple Mount.

Among those barred on Tuesday was Jewish Home Knesset Member Shuli Moalem-Refaeli as well as busloads of school children.

The Temple Mount remained open for Muslims, of course.

Sukkot Hike Raises Money for Camp Koby

Monday, September 23rd, 2013
Sukkot hike raises money for Camp Koby.

Sukkot hike raises money for Camp Koby.

More than 60 people took part in a special one day Kilometers for Koby Sukkot hike along the Israel Trail and the Burma Road this week to help raise funds for Camp Koby, established in memory of terror teenage victim Koby Mandell.

He and a friend were killed nearly 13 years ago in a terrorist attack while hiking near their home in Tekoa, east of Efrat in Gush Etzion. The tragedy spurred his parents, Rabbi Seth and Sherri Mandell, to create The Koby Mandell Foundation to benefit the families of others who have lost loved ones to terror and other tragic circumstances. The   hike began at Neve Shalom and ended in Park Eshtaol and included both Israelis and American tourists.

Birkat Cohanim

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

On Sunday morning, the traditional Birkat Cohanim, Blessing of the Priests, was held in the Kotel plaza. The Kotel was packed.

.Birkat Cohanim

 

 

 

.Shacharit on Sukkot at the Kotel

 

 

 

.Priestly Blessing at the Kotel

 

Next year on the Temple Mount.

Jewish Agency Seeks ‘Number One Sukkah in the World’

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

The Jewish Agency for Israel has launched a competition to find the Number One Sukkah in the World.

The competition, dubbed “Sukkathon 2013,” invites Jewish individuals and communities around the world to submit photos of their sukkahs for consideration by a panel of judges. The judges include the South African-Israeli architect Pam Davidson, British art critic and art history lecturer Julia Weiner, and artist Betina Schneid, a recent immigrant to Israel from Brazil, who has participated in The Jewish Agency’s Ulpan Etzion program in Jerusalem.

Photo submissions will be welcomed until Monday, September 23, and the winner will be announced on the Hoshana Rabba festival da, the last day of Sukkot, this, Wednesday.

As part of the Sukkathon, children from the Jewish Agency’s Ye’elim Immigrant Absorption Center in Be’er Sheva have submitted a photo of themselves (above) in the absorption center sukkah, which they helped build and decorate.  Hundreds of new immigrants living in the absorption center are preparing to celebrate their first Sukkot in Israel, as are thousands of other immigrants at Jewish Agency absorption centers around Israel.  Some 350 individuals reside in Ye’elim, including some 130 children.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/jewish-agency-seeks-number-one-sukkah-in-the-world/2013/09/22/

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