Photo Credit: Jewish Press

Julián Castro Walks Away From Condemning
Omar And Tlaib’s Anti-Semitism

Presidential hopeful Julián Castro (D) refused to condemn Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) and Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) for their anti-Semitism when asked to do so by this reporter.

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Speaking in CNN’s spin room following this week’s Democratic primary presidential debate, Castro was asked to comment on Omar and Tlaib’s pattern of anti-Semitism.  “Of course I don’t believe in any kind of anti-Semitism,” Castro said.

“So will you condemn Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib for their anti-Semitism?” this reporter asked.

“I don’t know which comment you’re talking about, so all I can speak to is, and I believe – I don’t believe that they are anti-Semitic,” Castro said.

The presidential hopeful was presented with Omar’s remark about support for Israel being “all about the Benjamins,” but he willfully ignored the example.

“I don’t believe they are –” Castro began as he walked away, refusing to address Omar’s specific remarks.  I pointed out that Castro asked me for a specific example of an anti-Semitic comment from Omar or Tlaib and that I provided him one. I asked again if he will condemn the extremist duo. Castro walked away.

 

Left-Wing Demand Justice Looks To Pack The Supreme Court

Demand Justice, an organization founded by former members of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and associated with a secretive “social welfare organization” financed by billionaire activist George Soros, is pushing a scheme to pack the Supreme Court with liberal justices by adding new seats to the nation’s highest court.

This comes after Demand Justice has failed in its repeated attempts to bring about the impeachment of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

The activism drive seeks to galvanize support for the concept of adding seats to the Supreme Court but does not explain the process of actually getting it done.

The Supreme Court expansion plot would be enacted if Democrats retake Congress and the presidency in 2020, according to the plan.

Demand Justice has played a central role in leading activism against Kavanaugh. Even before President Donald Trump first announced Kavanaugh as his official nominee, Demand Justice committed to spending about $5 million to oppose any eventual Trump nominee for the Supreme Court. The organization sought to raise $10 million in its first year.

Breitbart News reported that within less than one hour of Trump’s announcement that Kavanough was his nominee, Demand Justice had already put up the website stopkavanaugh.com, exclaiming: “We need to demand that the Senate defeat the Brett Kavanaugh nomination.”

The news media has routinely produced articles on Demand Justice protesters, with many pieces failing to inform readers that this is not a grassroots group but an organization spawned by professional organizers and tied to deep leftist funding.

Demand Justice is fiscally sponsored by the Sixteen Thirty Fund, one of four nonprofits run by the secretive, massively funded Arabella Advisors strategy company that pushes the interests of wealthy leftist donors. Arabella specializes in sponsoring countless dark money pop-up organizations designed to look like grassroots activist groups, as exposed in a recent extensive report by conservative watchdog Capital Research Center.

Soros’s Open Society documents that it provided financing to Sixteen Thirty specifically earmarked for Demand Justice activism.

The Capital Research Center’s expose documented that from 2013-2017 alone, Arabella’s four nonprofits spent a combined $1.16 billion with the aim of advancing “the political policies desired by wealthy left-wing interests through hundreds of ‘front’ groups.”

 

Lawyer For Whistleblower Has His Own Whistleblower Past

Andrew Bakaj, the attorney representing the whistleblower at the center of the impeachment movement targeting President Donald Trump, previously was a whistleblower witness whose public allegations scuttled the confirmation of the Trump administration’s nominee for CIA inspector general.

Bakaj’s original complaint against Trump’s nominee was filed with the office of the Inspector General for the U.S. Intelligence Community. The IG at the time was Chuck McCullough, who is currently working at Bakaj’s three attorney law firm representing the so-called whistleblower.

Like Bakaj, the whistleblower against Trump also filed his “Disclosure of Urgent Concern form” with the IG for the intelligence community, albeit with the new IG, Michael Atkinson.

Bakaj founded the Compass Rose Legal Group, which is representing the central whistleblower on the matter of Trump’s phone call with the Ukrainian president. Bakaj confirmed that his law firm is also representing “multiple whistleblowers in connection to the underlying August 12, 2019, disclosure to the Intelligence Community Inspector General.”

Bakaj previously interned for Hillary Clinton and did work for other Democrats. At the CIA, Bakaj helped to develop a whistleblower reprisal investigation program.

A search of Bakaj’s Twitter account finds rabid anti-Trump posts such as repeated advocacy for Trump cabinet members to invoke the 25th Amendment of the Constitution to remove Trump as president over claimed competency issues.

Missing from major news media coverage of Bakaj and his high-profile clients is that he was one of two former CIA employees who went public as whistleblowers to contradict the testimony of Christopher Sharpley, Trump’s CIA IG nominee.

In the 2017 case against Sharpley during the confirmation process, Bakaj was represented by Mark Zaid, who is senior counsel with the Compass Rose Legal Group where Bakaj now works.

Zaid in 2017 co-founded Whistleblower Aid, which also represented the case against Sharpley.

Whistleblower Aid has been actively helping the first whistleblower also being represented by Zaid by setting up a GoFundMe page seeking to raise funds for the purported whistleblower’s defense. The page already brought in some $210,066 with a goal of raising $300,000.

Whistleblower Aid was founded in September 2017 in the wake of Trump’s presidency to encourage government whistleblowers to come forward.

The group did not sit around waiting for whistleblowers. Upon its founding, Whistleblower Aid actively sought to attract the attention of Trump administration government employees by reportedly blasting advertisements for its whistleblower services on Metro trains, using mobile billboards that circled government offices for 10 hours a day, and handing out whistles on street corners as a gimmick to gain attention.

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