web analytics
September 30, 2016 / 27 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Friday’

The Death Of Rebbi

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

When Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi, the redactor of the Mishnah known as “Rebbi,” lay dying, he made his sons promise him that after his death they would set the Shabbat table and light the candles for him every Friday night.

There is a connection between the righteous, the world to come and Friday night. All are invested with kedushah (holiness). Kedushah is synonymous with peace. Shabbat is synonymous with peace. Shabbat Shalom. Peace is a state of harmony between body and soul when they no longer fight each other and no longer pull in different directions.

Perhaps nobody suffered more from internal strife than King David. Abigail’s words of farewell to King David as he lay dying were “May your soul be bound up in the bundle of life.” In the world to come, when the body is separated from the soul, there is eternal peace.

The soul, having left the body, settles in its eternal resting place under God’s heavenly throne. This, however does not happen immediately. According to the Talmud, for the first twelve months after death, the soul wanders restlessly between heaven and earth trying to reunite with the body. The lifelong partnership with the body, however volatile it may have been, is not easily terminated. It is only when the soul has reached the eternal level of holiness that it finally comes to rest in the presence of God.

Hence the Kaddish is recited during the first eleven months of restlessness to assist the soul in its quest for peace. On Friday night we rest in peace from the physical toil of the week and have a taste of the world to come. Indeed, Shabbat is referred to as a mirror of the world to come.

Few people have managed to live in eternal peace during their own lifetime. One such person was Rebbi, who lived in the second century. As he lay dying, he lifted his ten fingers toward heaven and said, “You know that I toiled with my ten fingers in the study of Torah. May it be your wish that there be peace in my place of eternal rest.” The Torah is a tree of life to those who cling to it. Its roads are harmonious and its ways are peaceful. No wonder, then, that Rebbi, who toiled his whole life in the streets of the Torah, found peace during his own lifetime. Indeed, he was known as our holy Rebbi, Rabbeinu Hakadosh.

It seems that Rebbi was so content in this world that he did not want to leave. “Why are you crying?” asked Rabbi Chiyah, the disciple of Rebbi. “You know it is a good omen to die with a smile.”

“I am crying on account of the Torah I will no longer be able to study and the commandments I will no longer be able to perform,” answered Rebbi.

Rebbi’s disciples did not want him to leave either. Neither, of course, did his “maidservant” (Amtei deRebbi). So they decreed the day a public fast and gathered around Rebbi’s home in the mountain village of Tzipori and prayed for his recovery.

“Anybody,” they warned “that breaks the news of Rebbi’s death will himself be put to death.” And as long as they prayed, Rebbi did not die. But he suffered terribly. And his “maidservant” could see him suffer no more. So she ascended to the roof carrying an earthenware jug. She turned her eyes heavenward and cried out, “the angels seek to take Rebbi and the people seek to keep Rebbi. May it be Your wish that those above overcome those below.”

But the disciples would not stop praying and would not release Rebbi from his suffering. So Rebbi’s “maidservant” held the earthenware jug aloft and cast it down into the street below where the disciples stood praying. The crash of the earthenware on the street below silenced their prayers for an instant and Rebbi’s soul departed. “Bo b’shalom” – come in peace – the angels greeted him.

The soul of Rebbi was equally at peace both in this world and the next. His soul did not suffer the distress of the wandering souls. And so we are told that each Friday night when Boi B’shalom was recited, he would return home, sit at the Friday night table and say Kiddush for his family. One Friday night, however, a neighbor saw him. Fearing that those who saw him would elevate him in their minds above his peers, he departed and was never seen again.

Raphael Grunfeld

What Happened at Rachel’s Tomb?

Monday, October 29th, 2012

I read this at the blog, “Occupied Palestine”:

Thousands of Jewish settlers stormed Bilal bin Rabah Mosque, known by Jews as “Rachel’s Tomb” on Sunday night, and performed Talmudic rituals on the anniversary of “Rachel’s death.

Do you think that’s the truth?

Oops, I just realized sarcasm doesn’t go over the Internet well.

Here‘s the actual story from Arutz Sheva:

About 13,000 people had arrived at the compound from Thursday evening to Friday afternoon. A total of about 70 thousand people are expected by Sunday.

This year the anniversary of the matriarch Rachel’s passing fell on the Sabbath, when observant Jews do not travel. Those marking the anniversary compensated by moving celebrations of her life to the days immediately before and after.

As part of the preparations for the celebrations, volunteers from the Ichud Hatzalah organization, including doctors and paramedics, were deployed starting on Thursday afternoon at Rachel’s Tomb. As of Saturday night they treated 13 people, including three who were evacuated to hospital. Most of the casualties suffered bruises and injuries as a result of the crowding in the area.

The Egged bus company, which had been providing transportation to the compound, could not handle the large number of visitors, and, as can be seen in the following video, on Saturday night tens of thousands of people began marching on foot from Jerusalem’s Gilo neighborhood to the compound.

Visit My Right Word.

Yisrael Medad

Two Very Different Jews Memorialized on Saturday

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

Memorials for two memorable Jews took place this weekend, though they stood, perhaps, on opposite sides of the political spectrum.

The Matriarch Rachel, wife of the Patriarch Jacob and mother to biblical figures Joseph and Benjamin, was remembered on the 11th of the Jewish month of Cheshvan, being visited by a reported 70,000+ of her and her husband’s descendants.  Jews from all over Israel and all walks of life came on Friday and Saturday night to pay their respects to the beloved matriarch, who is considered to be the mother of aliyah, said to be weeping for her exiled children by the prophet Jeremiah.

On Saturday night, a somewhat different Jew was also remembered, albeit by a significantly smaller and less pious crowd.  Less than 25,000 people gathered in Tel Aviv on Saturday night to remember former Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin.  Less a celebration of his life and accomplishments than a nostalgic gathering for Oslo and reflection on his murder, the Rabin memorial this year was themed “Remembering the Murder: Fighting for Democracy”.

Jewish Press Staff

Pro-Jewish Activists Drive in Solidarity with Southern Hebron

Sunday, October 21st, 2012

Tens of vehicles from across Israel set out in single file to show support and solidarity to the residents of the South Hebron Hills on Friday.

Women in Green, a staunchly pro-nationalist group which organized the event said it was meant to protest an occurrence during Sukkot in which they say police dressed up disguised as Arabs, and staged a possible infiltration of the Jewish community of Susiya, entrapping residents who came out to defend the town from an Arab attack.

According to the attorney of the accused, a representative of the Honenu legal rights organization, policemen dressed as Arabs approached the Har Sinai farm, owned by the wife and children of Yair Har-Sinai, who was murdered by Arab terrorists in 2001. Four Jewish men confronted the Arabs, and a fight ensued.  The officers responded with tasers and tear gas, with several more emerging from hiding and arresting three of the men.  The fourth escaped ,but was arrested on Thursday.

According to their attorney, the story’s ending was much better than it could have been – had the armed security guard of Susiya discovered the “Arabs” before the four unarmed Jewish men, someone might have been shot.

Friday’s caravan of vehicles drove from Kiryat Arba, next to the biblical city and home to the Tomb of the Patriarchs, Hebron, and waved banners saying “You are not alone.

According to the organizers, Jewish communities there have suffered the harassment and provocation of anti-Israel activists for years, who come to the region to protest Jewish life in what they say is the heartland of the Jewish people.

The Benjamin Residents’ Committee, the Samaria Residents’ Committee, and the Komemiyut movement also took part in the event.

Malkah Fleisher

IDF Base Robbed

Friday, October 19th, 2012

An IDF base a few miles west of Tiberias was robbed Friday morning after masked men entered the base, tied up a soldier, and stole his rifle and several other weapons.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Large Bomb Explodes on Gaza Border

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Friday – Gazans/Palestinians claimed they blew up an IDF tank or armored vehicle along the Gaza border on Friday morning.

It’s been confirmed that the Gazans did blow up a large bomb (IED) on the border, but all they managed to seriously damage was the fence. There were no IDF injuries or damage in the explosion.

IDF tanks shot back in response.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Gaza Fires Anti-Aircraft Missile at IAF

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Yediot reported Tuesday that Gazan Arabs launched a Strela-2 surface to air missile at an IAF aircraft on Friday, but the missile missed its target.

The IDF beleives that Gaza has a number of these missiles stockpiled, but haven’t used them due to fear of an escalated IDF response.

The missile systems were reportedly smuggled in from Libya.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/gaza-fires-anti-aircraft-missile-at-iaf/2012/10/16/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: