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September 3, 2014 / 8 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘ron dermer’

Exclusive Interview with New Israeli Ambassador to US

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

My exclusive interview with Ron Dermer (new Israeli Ambassador to US). Ambassador Dermer describes his views on the relationship between Israel and the United States and how it functions as a friendship and a partnership. Support for Israel among the American people is at record highs, bi-partisan and deep. Hear Ambassador Dermer’s thoughts on what is ahead in the coming years between Israel and the USA.

Second, an excellent speech from Minister of Tourism, Dr. Uzi Landau at the National Religious Broadcasters Conference plus commentary.

Third, interviews with two young Christian Zionist activists: Andrew Summey http://andrewsummey.com/ and Caleb Waller — hear how they are making a difference!

Thank you to the Yishai Fleisher Show Sponsors: Heart to Heart, The Jewish Press, United With Israel, IsraelPhones, and Janglo.net

Israel’s New US Ambassador Presents Formal Papers to Obama

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

In accordance with the ritual known as “credentialing,” Israel’s ambassador to the United States, Ron Dermer, presented the official documents naming him to his position to U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 3, at the White House.

The new ambassador signed the White House guest log with this message:

I feel proud and honored to serve as Israel’s ambassador to the United States. America is a country to which the Jewish people owe so much and to which I, as a son of America, am so personally indebted.  I look forward to working with you and your administration to make the bonds between Israel and America stronger than ever.

Along with the presentation of the formal papers, Dermer also presented Obama with a gift.  It is a pair of custom-made etched menorah cufflinks. The etching is a replica of the etched Menorah Tablet found in the City of David Excavations in ancient Jerusalem.

The Menorah etching dates back to approximately the year 0 of the Common Era. It is one of the earliest depictions of the ancient universal symbol of Judaism. It also is a reminder to those who may otherwise forget, Jews have been in Jerusalem for millennia.

cufflinks given to US Pres. Obama by Israeli Ambassador to the US, Ron Dermer, Dec. 3, 2013

cufflinks given to US Pres. Obama by Israeli Ambassador to the US, Ron Dermer, Dec. 3, 2013

And just to lighten the mood, Dermer told President Obama that the day probably marked the first time in 40 years that there was a Golda in the Oval Office.  The Golda in the Oval Office 40 years ago, of course, was Golda Meir, the fourth Prime Minister of Israel who held that position from 1969 to 1974. The present Golda is Dermer’s 5 month old daughter.

Dermer, a thoroughly modern diplomat, tweeted the updates to his followers.

Dermer had already presented his credentials to the State Department’s Deputy Secretary of State William J. Burns on Friday, Oct. 11, but the formal presentation of papers to the sitting president is the final step in the process.

New Envoy to US, Ron Dermer, Has Big Demands for Perks

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Many Israeli officials are known to think a lot of themselves, but Ron Dermer, Israel’s next ambassador to the United States, takes the cake.

He has demanded to start working before an agreed date and has come up with unprecedented demands for housing and staff, according to the Hebrew-language Yediot Acharonot newspaper.

Dermer wants to assume his duties on the first of September even though outgoing Ambassador Michael Oren will remain in office until the end of next month.

Dermer also reportedly has demanded to bring his own personal staff from Israel although an ambassador does not have that privilege and has to work with the diplomatic staff that is in place. He also wants an alternative to the official ambassador’s residence, claiming that his family with five children needs bigger quarters.

Government Approves Ron Dermer as Ambassador to US

Sunday, July 28th, 2013

The Israeli government unanimously approved the appointment of Ron Dermer, an Oleh from the US, as Israel’s next ambassador to the U.S.

Israel’s Effective New Advocate

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

The official announcement that Ron Dermer is to be appointed Israel’s new ambassador to the United States was only a few hours old when the brickbats prepared by the Jewish state’s critics started to fly in his direction.

Dermer, a close aide to Prime Minister Netanyahu, had long been rumored to be the successor to Michael Oren. But while Oren largely escaped much negative scrutiny during his time as Israel’s most important foreign envoy, Dermer should expect to find himself in the cross hairs of left-wing attacks even before he arrives in his new office.

As Haaretz’s story on the appointment put it, Dermer is seen by the left as the worst of all possible creatures: a “right-wing neocon with close ties to the Bush family.”

But rather than seeking to preemptively sandbag Dermer in this fashion, the Jewish left should understand that he is ideally suited to be Israel’s ambassador to its superpower ally.

Oren, a historian with a better grasp of America’s attitudes toward Israel than virtually anyone else in the Jewish state, was an outstanding diplomat. But Dermer brings to his job the one element most necessary to ensure that misunderstandings between Washington and Jerusalem are kept to a minimum in the coming years.

As someone who is as close to Netanyahu as anyone currently working in the Prime Minister’s Office, Dermer will be seen as a direct conduit to Israel’s leader thereby enabling him to play a vital role the U.S.-Israel relationship as efforts to stop Iran’s nuclear program come to a head and Secretary of State John Kerry’s attempts to revive the peace process continue.

Like Oren, Dermer is a native of the United States who immigrated to Israel as an adult. He may be best known here for being the co-author of the best-selling The Case for Democracy: The Power of Freedom to Overcome Tyranny and Terror with Natan Sharansky. The book, which puts forward the position that democratic reform is the necessary prerequisite for both peace in the Middle East and any hope for a better life for the Muslim and Arab worlds, was famously embraced by President George W. Bush, who said it put into words exactly how he felt about the issue.

While this “neocon” testament is, among other influences, blamed for America’s unsuccessful attempts to bring democracy to the Middle East in the last decade, the truth is, the book is actually quite prescient about the failures of premature experiments in democracy in Iraq, the Palestinian Authority and now in Egypt. Unlike those who fetishize elections as the sole determinant of freedom, Dermer and Sharansky understood that there was more to the concept than casting ballots in the absence of a culture that fostered consensus about democratic values.

But Dermer’s critics dislike more than this one excellent book. They see him as having ties with Republicans that could offend the Obama administration. He was widely, and wrongly, blamed for what many in the press claimed was Netanyahu’s attempt to support Romney in the U.S. presidential election last year. But the spat that erupted between the two countries last September over Netanyahu’s plea that Obama establish “red lines” over the Iranian nuclear threat was more the president’s doing than the prime minister’s.

Moreover, Dermer, an American with broad knowledge of the politics of both countries knows, as Oren did, that the primary duty of his new job will be to ensure that the alliance functions smoothly. Anyone who thinks he will be picking fights with the administration, or that the White House and the State Department won’t be smart enough to understand that having direct access to someone with Netanyahu’s ear is in their best interests, knows nothing about diplomacy or how Washington works.

But it should be noted that Dermer’s reputation as a staunch and pugnacious advocate for Israel will be a major asset for him and his country, not a drawback. Dermer has shown over the past few years that he isn’t afraid to speak up about the unfair treatment to which Israel has been subjected. As his famous rebuke in 2011 to The New York Times – in which he refused an offer to have Netanyahu write for its op-ed page because it would have been a fig leaf of fairness after a deluge of critical pieces about the Jewish state – showed, Dermer understands that staying quiet about media bias or distorted views about the conflict doesn’t help.

Mother of New Ambassador Dermer: He’s a Red-Blooded American

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Ron Dermer, Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s choice to succeed American-born Michael Oren as Israel’s Ambassador to the United States, moved to Israel 16 years ago but his mother Yaffa told the Miami Herald, “ I think he’ll do a wonderful job because he’s a red-blooded American.”

Yaffa Dermer, a resident of Florida but born and raised in Israel, quickly added that her son “loves” Israel.

Her son wears a kippa and is modern Orthodox.

He also is a good son, his mother says. “He told me he’s going to visit me a lot.”

 

 

Netanyahu Names American Immigrant Ron Dermer Ambassador to US

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced Tuesday he is appointing American-born Ron Dermer as Israel’s next Ambassador to the United States, the second American in a row to represent Jerusalem in Washington.

Dermer, who will replace Michael Oren, has served as Prime Minister Netanyahu’s senior adviser for the past four years and served as the economic attaché at the Israeli Embassy in Washington from 2005 to 2008.

He was born in Florida, is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business and holds a master’s degree in philosophy, politics and economics from Oxford.

Dermer immigrated to Israel in 1997. He once wrote in the now defunct New York Sun that he “left America because I wanted to help another nation I love defend the freedoms that Americans have long taken for granted.”

Dermer has a background of political activism in the Republican party, having worked with the GOP in the 1994 mid-term elections before going to Oxford. While studying there, he shuttled to Israel to work on behalf of Natan Sharansky and his Yisrael B’Aliyah party.

His appointment gives Prime Minister Netanyahu a close ear in Washington, where Dermer is familiar with back channels, noted JTA’s Ben Sales last year, when Dermer’s name was being floated for the ambassadorial post.

“Netanyahu likes him, respects him and listens to him,” Netanyahu’s former national security adviser Uzi Arad told the JTA. “I often asked for his advice. In many ways he was a guy to listen to. When it came to knowledge and being cultured and erudite and intellectually inclined, that’s him.”

“He understands how Americans view Israelis and how Israelis view Americans,” Mitchell Barak, an Israeli pollster who met Dermer as an adviser to former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, told Sales. “He knows how to work [in Washington] and has personal relations.”

Dermer’s views are strongly nationalist and indicate that Netanyahu is finished with any more “good will” concessions to the Palestinian Authority.

Dermer castigated The New York Times in 2011 with an open letter that attacked its news coverage and its Op-Ed page.

Times columnists “consistently distort the positions of our government and ignore the steps it has taken to advance peace,” Dermer wrote in the letter, which was published in The Jerusalem Post. “It would seem as if the surest way to get an op-ed published in The New York Times these days, no matter how obscure the writer or the viewpoint, is to attack Israel.”

Dermer wrote in 2003 that Israel would be giving up its sovereignty if it were to agree to the Bush “Roadmap” plan.

“It is one thing for Israel to take into consideration what America says,” he wrote. “In fact, Israel’s national interest demands that it do so. But it is quite another to cede to a third party, no matter how friendly, the right to determine Israel’s future.”

Dermer co-authored with Sharansky “The Case for Democracy,” a book that reportedly was a major influence on President George W. Bush..

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/netanyahu-names-american-immigrant-ron-dermer-ambassador-to-us/2013/07/09/

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