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May 4, 2016 / 26 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘vacation’

Ministers Aim To Reduce Vacation Costs In Israel

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

By Jonathan Benedek/TPS

Tourism Minister Yariv Levin and Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon presented a national plan earlier on Wednesday, November 11 that aims to reduce vacationing costs in Israel.

“We are jointly presenting today a broad national program that, for the first time, deals with the core issues of tourism and creates a historical procedure which, according to professional sources, will reduce the cost of vacationing in Israel by about 20% over five years,” explained Tourism Minister Yariv Levin. “This is a step that will be felt in the pocket of each and everyone of us.”

As part of the plan introduced by Ministers Levin and Kahlon, approximately 15,000 hotel rooms will be built over the next five years and 27,000 hotel rooms over the next ten years. The increase in the number of hotel rooms is meant to increase competition, helping to reduce vacation costs by about twenty percent.

Additionally, hotels will be considered “national infrastructure,” allowing for the approval process of hotel construction by the National Infrastructure Committee, to be much more fluid and quick.

In particular, the plan seeks to make an easier business environment for entrepreneurs in the hotel industry. “The program will ensure that entrepreneurs will not be forced to go through the bureaucratic ordeals, and the construction of a hotel in Israel will no longer be a dream,” Levin said.

The plan also attempts to minimize risk for entrepreneurs. Independent local committees for example, will be able to approve up to 20% of hotel rights for residential purposes, helping to reduce risk assumed by entrepreneurs in a hotel project.

“We are providing an answer and a solution to entrepreneurs and investors from Israel and overseas that, until now, have been prevented from investing in hotels in Israel, and we are reducing the economic risk inherent in investment,” explained Levin pointing to the potential benefits for entrepreneurs.

Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon, Chairman of the Kulanu Party echoed Minister Levin’s remarks. “Strengthening the tourism sector in these times in particular is in the national interest,” said Kahlon.

“Shortening the procedures for planning and construction in the industry joins the other initiatives in the housing market that we are leading, by removing the obstacles and reducing unnecessary bureaucracy,” continued Kahlon. “We will continue to work to increase competition, reduce the cost of living and ease the lives of citizens in all spheres of life.”

Bureaucratic hurdles and a shortfall of hotel rooms pushed Ministers Levin and Kahlon to initiate reforms in the hotel industry. Despite the construction of approximately 3,000 new hotel rooms in Israel over the last decade, the cost for overnight hotel accommodations increased by about 70% over the same time period.

The national plan aims to match supply with increasing demand and is scheduled to be presented for government approval on Sunday, November 15.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

What Israelis Do During Pesach Vacation

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

From North to South, Israelis take advantage of the Pesach holiday vacation to tour and experience our beautiful country.

Looking at the hills near the Dead Sea

Looking at the hills near the Dead Sea – Nati Shohat/FLASH90

Riding camels at the Almog junction.

Riding camels at the Almog junction – Nati Shohat/FLASH90

Bicycling up north.

Bicycling up north – Basal Awidat/Flash90

Picnicing in Gush Etzion.

Picnicing in Gush Etzion – Gershon Elinson/Flash90

Barbecue in Jerusalem

Barbecue in Jerusalem – Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Photo of the Day

Kinar Galilee Hotel

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015

Located on the North Eastern shores of the Sea of Galilee, the Kinar Galilee Hotel offers relaxation and serenity at its finest. This remarkable location allows guests to venture on exciting activities in Northern Israel, while also providing infinite options within the vicinity of the hotel.

The Kinar Hotel Galilee accommodates a religious, respectful, and kosher environment with their beautiful synagogue and mikvah on sight, separate male and female beach areas, and an incredible array of kosher meals. The coziness of accommodations at the hotel allow guests to feel at home within minutes of arrival. The hotel is suitable for special events, such as bar mitzvah or Shabbat Chatan, with a variety of family style rooms, as well as interconnecting rooms.

Ahikam Ramat, CEO of the Kinar Galilee Hotel says “We offer an experience of adventure, tranquility, and originality from beginning to end”. Choose from endless options for any member of your family; be it the outdoor play area for children, or a relaxing day filled with massages and other treatments for adults at the hotel’s spa. Additionally, the hotel offers an Olympic sized pool, indoor Jacuzzi and saunas, and full-sized tennis and basketball courts.

The Kinar Galilee Hotel coordinates for every occasion; conferences, special events, large family vacations, or a simple stay for two.

To experience this enjoyable vacation, contact Talia at pr1@impmedia.co.il.

Jewish Press Staff

Hebrew University to Close for Christmas

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Hebrew University will give its students the day off on Christmas for the first time ever.

There will be no classes on Thursday, Dec. 25, a new vacation day on the university calendar. The students also had off on Sunday for Hanukkah.

The university also has declared a vacation day for and placed on its institutional calendar the Muslim holiday of Id al-Adha, or Feast of the Sacrifice, which will next take place on Sept. 9, 2015.

“This in order to accommodate students of all religions studying at the university and to respect their holidays,” Dov Smith, the university spokesman, said in a statement.

The majority of the university’s students and staff are Jewish and Muslim.

JTA

My Park

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

I grew up a few blocks from the Ramat Gan National Park, a man made urban park, which isn’t really national, with a nice, little man made lake. It’s only 0.7 square miles, but when I was growing up it was plenty.

Googlemaps screen shot

Googlemaps screen shot

On summer afternoons, my dad would come home early from work and we’d drive over, rent a boat (you had to leave your watch as deposit in the rental booth, to make sure you didn’t steal your boat, which occasionally made it difficult to come back on time).

They made the artificial lake in 1959, and dad and I were regulars there. They also built a restaurant in the middle of the lake (see top picture), which I don’t think ever actually operated. I could be wrong. Throughout my childhood it was just this cement shell you’d circle with your rowboat.

I suppose some ideas need to be thought through better. But the park continues to be a source of safe fun for the locals. It’s gotten more Haredi in recent years, but it’s still as happy as it used to be, I think. I don’t go there much these days, since we live in Netanya. I don’t know if they still rent boats. I should take my daughter one day and check it out.

The local ducks and the cats are very happy.

ducks in the park

Yori Yanover

Civil Liberties and the Governance Act

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

I recently received an anxious phone call from an Israeli coalition MK. Due to a mix-up in the Knesset scheduling he left early for an overseas vacation.

“They want me to come back to Israel because of you,” the affable MK said to me. I inquired as to what I had done wrong.

“You are going to vote against the Governance Act,” he replied. “It is a Basic Law and the coalition needs 61 votes to pass it. If you plan to vote against the law, as you did the last time it was voted upon in the Knesset, they will force me to come back to Israel to vote.”

It was a very awkward moment, as the MK is my friend.

“Look,” I said to him, “my problem with this law is not the raising of the votes threshold [required to win a Knesset seat]. I actually support that measure. I also have no problem with limiting the number of ministers in the government. On the contrary, I would be pleased if they would lower the number of ministers to fewer than 10. My problem is with the part of the law that requires 61 signatures in order to submit a no-confidence measure in the Knesset. This will actually neutralize the no-confidence option because if you have 61 signatures, you already have a new coalition; thus no need for no confidence.

“In this situation,” I continued, “I am terribly sorry to say that you will have to come back to Israel. There is no way that I am going to vote in favor of legislation that eliminates the Opposition just to be nice to a friend. But let me check once more. Perhaps the 61-clause was taken out of the legislation. In that case, with or without your vacation troubles, I will support the law.”

I called MK David Rotem (Yisrael Beiteinu), head of the Knesset’s Constitution Committee.

“Please explain to me exactly what the new version of the law says,” I asked him. “Does it still require 61 signatures for a no-confidence vote?”

“No,” Rotem replied. “The new version allows for the submission of a no-confidence measure just like it is now, except that instead of allowing for it once a week, it will be once a month. In addition, the prime minister will have to be present during the deliberations.” (I agreed to that immediately). “If you have 61 signatures,” Rotem added, “you will be able to submit the no-confidence measure in the same week. [There will be] no need to wait a month.”

I was very pleased. First, I am happy that my MK friend will not have to cut short his vacation. But more than that, I am happy because I know that I have a part in the transformation that this law underwent: from a bad law to a just and even important law. The farce of bountiful no-confidence votes, which keeps the entire government running back and forth to the plenum in the middle of their week’s work in order to reject every hiccup from Ahmad Tibi (Ta’al), was in dire need of balance. On the other hand, those in the government who thought that they could take advantage of this problem in order to undermine civil liberties also had to change.

“Enjoy your vacation and don’t forget to bring me a souvenir,” I happily told the anxious MK.

Moshe Feiglin

‘Danger of Fire’ from Shabbat Candles Shuts Out Jewish Tourists

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

Orthodox Jews from Manchester and London have decided to end their annual summer visit to a campus on the Welsh coast after the host University of  decided that lighting candles on Shabbat is a fire hazard.

Jews have not always been welcome guests at the University of Aberystwyth, which is empty of students during the summer vacation. In 2009, the Jews were welcomed with swastikas on the grass and on piece of paper found in residence halls.

University authorities insisted there was nothing anti-Semitic in their new condition for the Jewish tourists to visit, according to the London Independent.

It quoted a university spokesman as saying, “The university… would be delighted to welcome this group back, as long as they are able to sign our terms and conditions.”

However, one of the annual visitors, identified by the Independent as ”Mrs. Brander,” said, “We have found a holder to make each candle safer. We offered to  discuss it with the fire brigade, but  the university was not interested.”

Jewish families rent the university’s facilities on the coast for a vacation away from the Britain’s urban centers. In the past years, they have lit candles on Friday nights at the University of Aberystwyth without any question, until last year, when they were told of the new condition. During the same summer, a visiting rabbi drowned.

The tourists ignored the request until recently, when they decided they could not give up the lighting of candles.

“Ultimately, there was no real decision for us – our religion requires the lighting of candles,” Brander told the British newspaper.

The University of Aberystwyth five years ago defended itself against charges of anti-Semitism by London Spectator columnist Melanie Phillips, who published charges by a student that he had to write anti-Israeli and anti-American opinions or face receiving lower marks.

The student complained that in one course, a comparison was made between the treatment of Jews in Germany before the Second World War and the treatment of Muslims today. The lecturer reportedly told the student, “My assertion that Israel has been engaged in state terrorism lies first in a clear understanding of what the aims and consequences of terrorism are.”

The university replied that the course was given with the aim of being “objective, with no bias and no prejudice against any race or country.”

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/danger-of-fire-from-shabbat-candles-shuts-out-jewish-tourists/2013/05/30/

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