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October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
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There’s No Ban on Women’s Tefillin, Ban on Stupidity Still Holding


The author praises the principal of SAR for permitting his female students to pray with tefillin on, and, in the same breath, criticizes the Women of the Wall for praying with their talitot and tefilling at the Kotel. Is Mr. Yanover using a double standard? Click to find out.

The author praises the principal of SAR for permitting his female students to pray with tefillin on, and, in the same breath, criticizes the Women of the Wall for praying with their talitot and tefilling at the Kotel. Is Mr. Yanover using a double standard? Click to find out.
Photo Credit: Miriam Alster/FLASH90

A couple nights ago, my friend Larry Yudelson posted a link to a Jewish school paper in LA reporting on a Jewish school in the Bronx, where, back in December, the principal permitted two girls to put on tefillin during the girls-only morning prayer. We ran it as a news brief (with the appropriate hat tip to Larry) and didn’t think much more about it. But then the competition, Forward and Times of Israel, avid Jewish Press readers that they are, picked up our lead (no hat tips, though) and regurgitated the student paper’s original report and then some.

So, first of all a big Yishar Koach to the writers and editors of the Boiling Point, the online student newspaper of Shalhevet High School in LA. First, for catching and reporting the story, and second for not going crazy about it, such as depicting these two girls’ teffilin thing as a victory for womankind over male rabbinic repression, which is what the grownup papers inevitably did. To date, they’ve called the story Orthodox girls fight for the right to don tefillin (TOI), and the somewhat less combative Modern Orthodox High School in New York Allows Girls to Wear Tefillin (Forwrd), that the Forward quickly followed with the heroic war poem My Fight To Lay Tefillin At an Orthodox School by strapped combatant Eliana Fishman.

JewishPress.com will be covering more of this story in the next few days, God willing. But meanwhile, I believe we should extract the entire issue from the area of controversy, where it just doesn’t belong.

Women have been a challenge to rabbinic Judaism since Rivka called her kid Yaakov over to pull a fast one on her husband, Yitzhak. And feminine rage has been with us for about the same length of time.

The Talmudic sage Ulla (latter part of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th centuries) once stayed at the house of R. Nahman in Babylon. They had a meal and Ulla said grace, and handed the cup of benediction to R. Nahman. R. Nahman said to him: Please send the cup of benediction to Yaltha (his wife).

So Ulla said to him: Thus said R. Johanan: The fruit of a woman’s body is blessed only from the fruit of a man’s body, since it says, “He will also bless the fruit of your body” (Deut. 7:13). It does not say the fruit of her body, but the fruit of your body.

From this we understand that Ms. Yalta, who normally received the kiddush cup from her husband, on this particular occasion did not. And so she got up in a rage and went to the wine cellar and broke four hundred jars of wine.

At which point R. Nahman said to Ulla: Let the Master send her another cup. He sent it to her with a humorous message: All that wine that you spilled can be counted as a benediction. She returned an answer: Gossip comes from peddlers and vermin comes from rags. Which means she was in no mood for humorous remarks from traveling rabbis. (TB Brachot 51b).

In my opinion, after a little over 100 years of suffragists and feminists, it’s high time rabbinic Judaism came to terms with its women, before we lose any more wine barrels. And, indeed, we’ve done a lot in that direction, especially in shuls associated with the National Religious movement in Israel and the Modern Orthodox shuls in the rest of the world.

The problem is that it’s impossible to unload two millennia of rabbinic scholarship and halachic decisions in 100 years. No matter how hard we try, there are always going to be competing and adversarial streams that undermine the ideally smooth process of integrating our women into the Orthodox milieu.

It would have been much easier if religious women all decided to become deeply versed with Jewish law, and started pushing for a more equal, or at least a more prestigious role in the life of their religious communities. Then we would have seen a similar, ever increasing process of women’s integration as we’ve seen in the professions since about WW2.

About the Author: Yori Yanover has been a working journalist since age 17, before he enlisted and worked for Ba'Machane Nachal. Since then he has worked for Israel Shelanu, the US supplement of Yedioth, JCN18.com, USAJewish.com, Lubavitch News Service, Arutz 7 (as DJ on the high seas), and the Grand Street News. He has published Dancing and Crying, a colorful and intimate portrait of the last two years in the life of the late Lubavitch Rebbe, (in Hebrew), and two fun books in English: The Cabalist's Daughter: A Novel of Practical Messianic Redemption, and How Would God REALLY Vote.


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19 Responses to “There’s No Ban on Women’s Tefillin, Ban on Stupidity Still Holding”

  1. Adam Gorny says:

    How many days in a month the woman is clean? How often does she go to Mikvah? Everyday? Weekly? Those are conditions for Tefilin

  2. Max Turner says:

    How many days a month are you clean? Look in the mirror!

  3. Moishe Pupik says:

    There is no connection between the time of Nidda, which has to do with a woman's relations with her husband, and putting on tefillin. The Jewish Press should check readers for ignorance before letting them leave comments here.

  4. Robbie Goldstein says:

    Adam, it is a stupid argument. So, what about women who have reached menopause?
    You might want to read about Rashi and his daughters. He fashioned Tefillin for them to wear and had them don a Tallit.

  5. TEL AVIV – Thousands of women are being smuggled into Israel, creating a booming sex trade industry that rakes more than USD one billion a year, a parliamentary committee said on Wednesday.

    The Parliamentary Inquiry Committee, headed by Knesset member Zehava Galon of the left-wing Yahad party, commissioned the report in an effort to combat the sex trade in Israel. Findings showed that some 3,000 and 5,000 women are smuggled to Israel annually and sold into the prostitution industry, where they are constantly subjected to violence and abuse.

    The report, issued annually, said some 10,000 such women currently reside in about 300 to 400 brothels throughout the country. They are traded for about USD 8,000 – USD 10,000, the committee said.

  6. Caz MaxwellSolman-Repton says:

    Rivka was giving Yaakov what was rightfully his. She saw it but because of Yitzak's love for Esau he was blinded and then she had to take an opportune moment years later after God had changed Yaakov's heart to put it into motion. Sometimes putting in place what God has ordained is challenging.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Men and woman are not just gender different but also have different (but contributory equal) spiritual energy and potential. We all have a job that relates to physical and spiritual worlds. We need the rectification of these energies equally. That requires a program (of Torah) suited to bringing about the appropriate rectification of these energies. If a person has exhausted, completed and rectified ALL of his or her then we should discuss taking on 'more- other'. Until then, i suggest working on what we were given …first.

    LET'S NOT FORGET THE HALACHIC PRINCIPLE;
    'DO NOT CREATE A MACHLOKAS (controversy)' .
    WE OUGHT BE EXTREMELY CAUTIOUS WITH MAKING DECISIONS ON HALACHIC GUIDLINES. THERE ARE VERY REAL AND DEEP REASONS BEYOND PSHAT (THE SUPERFICIAL UNDERSTANDINGS) WHY THERE EXISTS DIFFERENT MITZAHS FOR MEN AND WOMEN. UPON DEEPER INSPECTIONS THESE REASONS BECOME CLEAR IN THE SAME WAY THERE EXISTS A WRITTEN TORAH AND AND AN ORAL TORAH.
    WRITENUT

  8. Anonymous says:

    Wait…. Here's an idea…
    Let's make stuff up because it makes us feel better today!

  9. Moishe Pupik says:

    writenut – The Torah encourages individual freedoms and individual choice. Even regarding tefillin, the most the sages have said is that men receive a higher reward than women for putting on tefillin, because they are commanded to wear them while women volunteer to do the same. No one has to exhaust all the mitzvot before the pick up a mitzvah they want to keep. Your statement has no concrete validity. In fact, we need more Jews doing miztvot that entice them, within the halachic boundaries. But I have news for you — each one of us gets to decide his or her boundaries.

  10. Anonymous says:

    This is just feminist nonsense that belittles women's real and important role in this world. Each one has his mitzvoth. People who want to do the others mitzvoth are misguided and usually not even fulfilling their own obligations.

  11. Moishe Pupik says:

    ederyav – So? Who said spiritual work was simple and easy? We search, we make decisions, we mess up, we fix. When did you decide that Torah was averse to choice?

  12. When my son was stationed in Iraq, I decided to pray wearing tefillin. This made me feel that my prayers were stronger. I did this in my walkin closet so that no one would see me …. It was between me and the Almighty only . My son made it home from Iraq fine although he was in danger frequently. So perhaps it helped … I'd like to think it did

  13. Daniela Esthetician says:

    "It would have been much easier if religious women all decided to become deeply versed with Jewish law, and started pushing for a more equal, or at least a more prestigious role in the life of their religious communities." That's actually pretty funny. Because the truth is, those of us who have thought to *bother* to ask the many religious women who are deeply versed in Jewish law are the ones who end up becoming religious ourselves. It's when we ask these women that we find out what nonsense this whole controversy is; tefillin aren't worn for the purpose of heightened spirituality. They're worn as a reminder to perform one's duties. No other reason. Religious women deeply versed in Jewish law know that to tell women we even need this is an insult to us! I think it's high time that people woke up and realize that it doesn't take doing what men do in order for women to be considered "equal". It takes understanding that what women do already is just as good as what men do. Only then will we have real equality. Until then we have nothing but a game of charades.

  14. the fat will really be in the fire when the administration at Central HS, a subsidiary of YU, are forced to respond to the issue.

  15. Suzy Baim says:

    We women and Jews in general have so many great mitzvos. We should focus on what we have. For example, lighting Shabbos candles with a blessing, doing chesed for others, being modest so our inner beauty shines through, going to the mikva when married, and raising the next generation. Teffillin is a very nice mitzvah, but it's like doing an assignment that the teacher didn't ask you to do and he says, "That's nice, but I asked you to do something else." Let's work on improving our prayer in general and add kavanah and passion to it. That alone can be powerful

  16. sara says:

    I think that this story is getting way more attention then it deserves. A handful of girls in a few very Modern Orthodox High Schools expressed an interest in wearing Tefilin- this is hardly a trend as the majority of religious women understand the wonderful and highly spiritual role they already hold in Judaism.

    Most religious women do not feel the need to wear tefilin to connect to G-d. Those who feel the need should do so- without all the hupla and media attention, as this causes divisiveness within the Jewish people which totally negates their desire to create a higher spiritual connection to G-d.

  17. The premise of the author's opposition to Women of the Wall is flawed. He claims that Women of the Wall are "attacking Halacha". Nothing could be further from the truth! Women of the Wall are deeply committed to Jewish law and firmly respect tradition. Our women's only prayer service in the women's section at the Kotel is run according to Jewish law and custom. Furthermore, Women of the Wall aims to improve the rights of women in this most public of public spaces using the tools of Democracy and social action.

  18. Rabbi Alona Lisitsa says:

    לע"ד תפסיקו להתייחס אליהן. הן תוקפות למען המתקפה, אין להן שום מטרה אחרת. רוב ההתקפות לשהן פשוט שקר. לא כדאי לדבר עם שקרניות.

  19. Iris Richman says:

    His issue is that WOW is "bad" in wearing tefillin – because they don't have permission of the administrator of the Kotel – ignoring that the courts approved and that most Jews reject the notion that the Kotel is a Haredi synagogue.

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