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November 21, 2014 / 28 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘sandwich’

Judge Lets 2nd Avenue Deli Keep Instant Heart Attack Sandwich

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

Warm up the defibrillator, the Instant Heart Attack Sandwich has life at New York’s 2nd Avenue Deli.

A U.S. District Court Judge in Manhattan ruled late last week that the sandwich cannot be confused with the Heart Attack Grill in Las Vegas and thus the deli can keep the sandwich – two latkes stuffed with corned beef, pastrami, salami or turkey – on the menu.

Judge Paul Engelmayer also said the deli can introduce the Triple Bypass sandwich – three stuffed latkes – noting that it would not be confused with one from the Heart Attack Grill, which sells giant cheeseburgers.

The deli is limited to using the names only in Manhattan.

In May 2011,  the Heart Attack Grill warned the 2nd Avenue Deli to cease serving its Instant Heart Attack Sandwich or be hauled into court for trademark violation.

The Wounded Sparrow’s Message

Monday, June 18th, 2012

My friend’s mother died the other day. I went to the funeral, cried with the mourners, walked the traditional four cubits following the coffin to escort the dead to their resting place, as is customary at Jewish funerals, and then went over to my friend to offer my condolences. And then it was over. The guests went home, the family went to bury their loved one, and I went back to my life.

But I can’t stop thinking about my friend. I can’t shake off the sadness I feel when I think of what my friend will go through in the coming days, weeks and months, as she gets used to life without her mother. People are telling me that life will go on, there will be simchas to attend, and new life will continue to come into the world even after my friend’s mother’s passing. But I can’t accept it. I’m not looking for a justification for continuing with life, for going back to my routine and feeling happy at the good things that happen even while others are experiencing tragedy, because I’m not happy. I’m looking for understanding, since I’m suffering along with my friend, and mourning her loss along with her.

Somehow, I can’t adequately express the sadness that I’m feeling for my friend at this terribly difficult time, and so no one understands.

But G-d understands.

On my lunch break today, I was contemplating these thoughts as I wandered aimlessly down the promenade outside my school, absorbed in my sadness. I considered calling a friend to talk, but gave up that idea when I realized its futility – people somehow just don’t get it.

And then G-d spoke to me.

I was walking past Café Metro when I noticed a sparrow leaning forward with her face on the ground. I didn’t want to look at such a reminder of life’s sadness, but as I walked by, I noticed it move. The sparrow was still alive. I paused for a moment, trying to think if there was some way in which I could help this suffering creature, and then I remembered the cream cheese sandwich I was carrying in my bag, but had postponed eating since, in my current mood I had no appetite. I decided to share my sandwich with the sparrow.

Then and there, in the middle of Myrtle Promenade, I opened my sandwich, crumbled a few pieces and placed them near the sparrow. She blinked her eyes, fluttered her wings, but did not eat the crumbs. I broke off several more pieces and placed them close to her beak, since it appeared she could not move her head. I stood for a few moments, watching sadly as her body expanded and contracted with her rapid breathing. After a few moments, she lifted her head.

I stood by, watching helplessly, wishing I could do more to help this poor little sparrow, as she slowly continued to raise her head more and began to stand upright. As this was happening, a gentleman walked by and noticed the bird and me. “That your bird?” he asked. I told him, no, it wasn’t, but I saw it was hurt and I wanted to help it. He didn’t have any advice for me, other than to take it home and nurse it back to health, but I was afraid to do so, and I felt I had nothing to offer the bird medically.

The bird began fluttering her wings, trying to fly. She succeeded, and flew all of two feet to the window ledge of the café, and half walked, half flied back and forth along it. As she did so, she bumped repeatedly against the glass, opposite the feet of an afternoon patron, oblivious to the disoriented sparrow just inches away from her, separated by the café window; a few inches away, but worlds apart.

A woman walked by, and without stopping, called out “it looks like her foot is stuck there.” The bird’s foot was not stuck, but I was touched by the fact that an average paranoid New Yorker was willing to get involved to a minimal extent when she saw that others cared. At this point, the gentleman walked off, I wished him a good day, and a minute later, I walked off as well. I couldn’t watch the sparrow die. Too much sadness was going on, and I didn’t want the sparrow to add to it.

I Dream of Bacon

Sunday, June 17th, 2012

http://notajew-jew.com/?p=279

You know you’re a Jew when…

After decades of dreaming about everything from girls, to breathing under water , to girls – suddenly I’m dreaming of…bacon.

First things first: I am a “lucid dreamer.” Which means that, while I dream, I realize I’m in a dream, and I make conscious decisions within the dream to shape it or change it. As recently as the 1980’s lucid dreaming was thought to not exist. But now scientists believe that 50% of people have had at least one lucid dream in their lives, and 20% have about one lucid dream per month.

I’m having them constantly. About bacon.

The thing about dreams is: there’s no hiding from the real you in your dreams.

Take the classic “I’ve gone to work and forgotten my clothes” dream. In such a dream, you may find yourself giving a presentation to your colleagues – only to look down and notice that you are presenting far more to your colleagues than you had bargained for.

If your first reaction is to be embarrassed and cover up – congratulations – you’re normal. Being embarrassed and covering up is probably what you would do in real life, if you suddenly found yourself presenting to your colleagues your naked PowerPoint (ahem). On the other hand, if your first reaction in a naked-at-the-office dream is to find the nearest vertical poll and start spinning on it, then perhaps your subconscious is trying to tell you that an office job is not for you.

The way “you” react in your dreams is the way You would react. The “you” in your dream is you.

The “me” in my dreams is a Jew.

Even though (depending on when you read this) I am not yet a Jew, my subconscious – the real me – is already a Jew. And he’s not just a Jew – he’s Shomer Kashrut.

After a lifetime of not dreaming about bacon, I suddenly find myself thrust into a parade of dreams that have tested me, coerced me, and even conspired to trick me with swine.

The first dream featured a pulled-pork sandwich. In the dream, the person who served me the sandwich told me it was fake vegetarian pork. One bite told me that was a lie. So I spit it out, didn’t swallow, and woke myself up.

Jew.

In another dream I was tricked with cheddar cheese. It seemed like normal cheddar cheese, but when I bit into it, all I could taste was bacon. I challenged my dreamworld bacon-pusher, but she claimed the cheese was just seasoned with fake bacon flavor. I sensed a lie. So again – ptuey-tuey – I spit it out and woke myself up.

Jew.

The most recent dream was downright weird and complex. I was confined to a hospital bed, and a doctor gave me an injection. When the “medicine” hit my bloodstream, I sensed something wasn’t Kosher. I asked the doctor: “What did you put in me?” He brushed me off, so I raised the intensity: “Was there pork product in that syringe?” Again, he punked me off. So I grabbed the doctor by his lab coat, yanked his face closed to mine, and menaced him until I saw fear in his eyes: “Tell me doc: will that shot kill me now, or in the afterlife?”

A Jew not to be messed with.

In my dreams, I dream as a Jew. That’s who I am in the deepest part of my subconscious.

Back in my waking world, I now return to my Jewish studies. So I can turn my dreams into reality.

Minus the bacon, of course.

NY Jews Lay Mitzvahs on Thick, Break World Record

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Members of the UJA-Federation of New York set a Guinness World Record on April 29 for assembling the greatest number of sandwiches for the needy in one hour.

The mitzvah-slathered soiree took place at Temple Beth Sholom in Roslyn Heights and involved 100 volunteers from the local Jewish community, 3,320 slices of bread, and gobs of soy butter (to ensure that it would not cause food allergies) and jam.  It was scheduled to coincide with the UJA’s annual Mitzvah Day.

After officially recording the event for its Guinness World Record certification, participants donated the sandwiches  - with cards and decorations affixed – to the Queens Jewish Community Council in Forest Hills and to Long Island’s Interfaith Nutrition Network in Hempstead.

The project was a “frenzy of good will”, according to co-chair of the UJA-Federation Guinness World Record Amy Mandell.

The record-breaking project was just part of greater Mitzvah Day celebrations, which included volunteering for a local kosher food charity, outdoor clean-ups, nursing home visits, a blood drive, and activities for children such as art projects.

Fresh, Fast & Low Fat Dinner Recipes!

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

It’s official. My “just had a baby” card has expired. Now that my son is 15 months old, I can no longer pull that out as an excuse for why I have not yet lost the weight. The truth is, I like food too much to skip meals or do any crash diets. This means that portion control is how I will attempt to get back to my pre-baby weight.

Rather than deprive yourself, it’s best to find a balance between indulging your inner foodie without over eating. If you want pizza, opt for whole-wheat thin crust with lots of veggies, and stick to one slice! When making a sandwich, use whole grains or whole wheat and again, pile on the veggies. Below is a fresh and fast lunch idea for a California Veggie Wrap. Can’t give up carbs for dinner? I have included a few delicious dishes that are low in fat, but loaded with flavor!

 

California Veggie Wrap My cousin Tova Cunin lives in California. Not only am I envious whenever I see her photos of the sunny state (I live in NY and winter here can be brutal!) but I also get major cravings whenever she posts a photo of her tasty cooking. For lunch I never seem to have the time to prepare myself something nutritious. I usually grab something on the go; however, her latest meal inspired me as it looks delicious and is easy enough to prepare when in a hurry.

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients: Ezekiel Sprouted grain tortillas Hummus Shredded Carrots 1 red pepper cut into strips 1 avocado, sliced into strips

 

Directions:

Toast the tortilla for less than a minute. Spread on some hummus. Layer the veggies on top. Roll up and cut in half.

 

 

Easy Beef with Broccoli This is an easy way to prepare beef and broccoli without the greasy feeling you would get from ordering takeout! This recipe could also be prepared with mushrooms and red pepper slices. Just add to the pan after cooking the beef.

 

Ingredients:

Broccoli

1 cup rice

1 lb. flank steak, or sandwich steak slices (pepper steak could also be used)

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tsp steak seasoning (I use McCormick Montreal Spice seasoning)

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 teaspoon minced ginger

 

Directions:

Steam broccoli & prepare the rice. In a bowl mix together the oil with the soy sauce, ginger and steak seasoning. Marinate the meat for 20 minutes. Heat a wok or frying pan and add 3 tablespoons oil. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and stir-fry briefly until fragrant. Add the sliced beef & brown. Once it is nearly cooked through add the broccoli. Stir-fry briefly. Serve with the cooked rice.

 

 

Tilapia Baked with Cumin The other night I wanted a fresh new recipe for dinner, so I called up my sister-in-law, Sarrit, who told me about the following tasty dish her mom often makes. I am a huge fan of my mother-in-law’s cooking so I knew without a doubt it would taste great. However, I also know that some of her dishes can be somewhat complicated so I was relieved to find out that this one is not only rich with flavor but is also easy to prepare.

 

Ingredients: Tilapia, either whole or fillets Cumin Black Pepper Paprika Salt olive oil 1 onion sliced 1 tomato sliced Several potatoes sliced thinly

 

Directions:

Pour some olive oil and the above listed spices into a 9 x 13 inch pan.  Add potatos, onion, and tomato slices to the pan and coat in the olive oil mixture and then layer.  Rub the tilapia with the same olive oil/spice mixture and place on top of the layered vegetables. Bake at 350 degrees, checking after 45 minutes to see if potatoes are done.

* If you are not using a whole tilapia, and instead are using fillets, check the fish after about 20 minutes and if it is ready take the fillets off of the vegetables and set aside. Return the pan with the vegetables to the oven and bake until potatoes are ready (soft). Then place fillets back on top of vegetables and serve.

 

 

Ginger Chicken Strips When I first had my baby, I couldn’t find the time to warm up a bowl of soup for dinner – forget about spending time in the kitchen to cook! Tired of takeout and literally TIRED, I needed a meal that was tasty and easy to make. This is the dish I put together. It is, indeed, fast and delicious. I even had time to take the photo afterwards! Ingredients: 1 cup of brown rice

College Cafeteria Angel

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

I was on a city bus as it stopped for a young boy frantically waving his arms, fearful the bus might not stop for him on this snowy February afternoon. As the boy, wearing a thin jacket, boarded the bus, he searched his pockets for bus fare, found nothing, and told the bus driver he had left his money at home. “Could you please let me ride this bus?” he asked.  “I promise to give you the money tomorrow. It’s so freezing outside, and it’s such a long walk home.” The bus driver refused, ordering the boy to leave the bus immediately.

The intensity of the snow increased. The thought of this young boy, clutching his schoolbooks, walking home through a freezing snowstorm, compelled me to give the boy a dollar for bus fare. None of the other passengers, sitting stone-faced, seemed to care about the boy’s plight – nor did anyone offer to help him. “Thank you, lady, so much!” he responded with a big smile. “If you give me your address, I’ll mail a dollar to you.” “That won’t be necessary,” I replied. “I’m just glad you’re going home in a warm bus.”

That evening, my daughter called me from her college dorm room to share an uplifting account of a kindness extended to her earlier in the day by a stranger.

“I was standing in line in the college cafeteria, with a sandwich on my tray, as I approached the cashier. ‘That will be two dollars’ she said. All I had in my pocket was one dollar, as I realized I had left my wallet in my dorm – and with only about 10 minutes until my next class, and my dorm room a seven-minute walk, I realized there wasn’t any time for me to return to my dorm for the money. I asked the cashier if she would let me give her the dollar after my class, and she refused. ‘I have to follow the rules,’ she said.”

My daughter told me how dejected she felt because if she had no lunch, she would not eat anything until evening, when her last class would end. “Mom, I’d feel so starved; the last time I ate was 7a.m.!” My daughter continued: “Just when I felt there was no hope, and I was about to return my sandwich, a lady suddenly appeared in my line and offered to give me the extra dollar I needed for my lunch. I hadn’t noticed her before, and she didn’t look like a student. As she handed me the dollar, I promised to pay her back, and asked her for her name and address. She smiled. “Don’t worry about paying me back, just enjoy your sandwich. I’m happy to help you.”

I mentioned to my daughter how I had helped a young boy on the bus earlier that day by giving him the dollar he needed to avoid a long walk home through a snowstorm, that he had offered to repay me, and that I said that I was happy to help him. Suddenly, I realized that my giving the boy a dollar and the lady giving my daughter a dollar were parallel events of kindness. “What time was it when the lady gave you the dollar?” I asked my daughter. “Oh, about 2:30 p.m.,” she responded. I realized that it was also at 2:30 p.m. that I had helped the boy. We were both amazed. I didn’t realize that at the same time I had helped the boy, a kind stranger had helped my daughter.

Hineni founder Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis, who provides great spiritual inspiration through her books and talks, stresses the Torah belief that every time you do a good deed, you create a good angel who walks with you throughout your life, guarding and protecting you. She states that the Hebrew word for good deed, “mitzvah,” means “connection”: “Every time you do a mitzvah, you connect to G-d.”

Pesach Wines

Thursday, March 26th, 2009

Pesach is a holiday where multiples abound. From the four questions, the 10 plagues and double dipping to the hodgepodge that is charoset or Hillel’s famous bitter herb and matzah sandwich, nothing seems to be singular on this holiday. If only our unleavened bread were privy to such excess.

 

With this theme in mind, I’d like to focus on wines made from multiple grape varietals, or “blends,” worth drinking at your Seder and beyond. And given the state of the economy, I thought it appropriate to focus on those priced below $25.

 

All wine lists must start with the Yiron. The flagship wine of the Galil Mountain winery has been a favorite of mine since its 2002 vintage. Currently, you can find the 2005, which is, simply put, the best wine for your money on the market. A blend of 50 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, 44 percent Merlot, 4 percent Syrah and 2 percent Petit Verdot, this Bordeaux plus style wine is both elegant and complex. Pour it into Eliyahu’s cup and smell it over the course of the Seder. Aromas of berry, smoke, tobacco, chocolate delicious! All with a beautifully soft mouth feel and long finish.

 

Sticking with the Bordeux varietals, the Dalton 2006 Alma, another Israeli wine, is made from 56 percent Cabernet, 25 percent Merlot and 19 percent Cabernet Franc. Dalton’s wines typically show restraint and elegance, and the Alma is no exception. Subtle aromas of toast, fresh berries, minerals and mint, together with well-integrated tannins and a long finish make the Alma a winner.

 

Odem Mountain Winery, whose products have recently hit shelves stateside, has a new blend worth trying. This boutique winery is the northern most winery in all of Israel, and the 2007 Volcanic Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot blend is a fruity wine, with big gripping tannins and spicy clove aromas. With its big body and chunky tannins, this wine will pair nicely with a big roast.

 

We all like a good deal, and when I found Kadesh Barnea’s 2005 Gilad for under $15, I had to try it. An unusual blend of Petit Verdot, Merlot and Syrah, this wine born in the Negev desert is a powerhouse. Toasty oak, tobacco and ripe cherry aromas lead to jammy fruit flavors, reminiscent of cherry pie. With its nicely integrated tannins and long finish, this wine would go great with my mom’s famous (only made on Pesach) meat borscht soup.

 

While California wineries such as Herzog, Hagefen, Covenant and the elusive yet special Four Gates Winery are producing lovely wines, most of the better wines from California are priced above $25. So for an under $25 wine that is something other than Israeli, I picked up the Capcanes 2007 Peraj Petita, a blend of 60 percent Garnacha, and 20 percent of Tempranillo and of Carinena. With little oak aging, this wine is fruit driven, showing nice minerality to go along with its ripe red fruit. While it lacks the structure of its big brother, the Peraj Ha’Abib, Petita is a lovely wine and a great choice for those who don’t like big, oak aged wines.

 

Finally, while many people prefer dry red wine for their four cups, I’d like to finish with a white blend on the market that is both very affordable and quite delicious. The 2007 Golan Sion Creek White is a blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Gewurztraminer and a touch of Muscat. This wine has beautiful fruity and floral aromas. On the palate is a crisp acidity with just a hint of sweetness.

 

Gary Landsman, a.k.a. the “wine tasting guy,” makes, sells, writes about and tastes wines. Visit his blog at www.winetastingguy.com or email him at gary@winetastingguy.com.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food//2009/03/26/

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