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Posts Tagged ‘Intel’

Intel Says It Exported $35 Billion from Israel in 40 Years

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

Intel is celebrating its 40th year in Israel with a report that it has exported one billion silicon processors worth $35 billion .

Last year, $3.5 billion worth of Intel products were exported from Israel, said the chip-making giant, which has received from the government billions of dollars in grants and enticements to locate and expand in Israel.

Intel has grown into Israel’s largest private employer, with 9.800 workers.

“Without innovation in Israel, the company has no right to exist,” said  Intel Israel president Mooly Eden. “Even as we develop and are at the spearhead of fab technology, we’re constantly moving on to the next technology.”

Intel is in the process of asking the Israeli government for $900 million in grants in return for building another new fab plant in Kiryat Gat, located next to the high-speed north-south Highway 6 that connects Be’er Sheva with access roads to Ben Gurion Airport, Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

Referring to Intel’s not having caught the fad for mobile devices and tablets, Eden told Globes, “There have been several revolutions. We didn’t respond fast enough, and now that there is a new revolution – wearable technology – the expectation is that we will respond more quickly. The fact that we have to close gaps is not part of Intel’s DNA. We are good in offense, not defense, and we should run faster in the next two years, and show that we’re not just closing gaps, but that we’re leading new trends, such as wearable technology and security.”

Another Reason to Make Aliyah :Israel’s Jobless Rate Drops

Monday, September 30th, 2013

The unemployment rate in Israel fell to a 20-year low in August, and unlike in the United States, participation in the job market is increasing, according to the latest data from the Central Bureau of Statistics

The jobless rate in August was 6.1 percent, compared with a 7.3 percent in the United States. The rate for September is expected to remain the same.

However, the official  unemployment rates do not include discouraged workers who have settled for part-time jobs or have given up looking for work.

Forbes estimated in June that the “real” jobless rate is more than 14 percent, while in Israel, increased participation in the labor market indicates the opposite.

The American jobless rate also is being driven down by “baby boomers” retiring, while the higher birth rate in Israel creates a larger labor pool as well as establishing the basis for further for more growth through consumption.

High-tech still is the rage in Israel, and none other than U.S.-based Intel almost always is looking for workers.

It also has saved the jobs of 800 workers of Micron Technology employees, which decided last December decided to close down its Israeli operations. Intel will take over Micron’s fab plant and incorporate all of the workers into its work force.

How the U.S. Benefits from its Alliance with Israel

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

When two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon in April, doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital found themselves well prepared for the aftermath.

Two years earlier, Israeli medical experts had helped update the hospital’s disaster response plan to deal with mass-casualty incidents. Drawing from expertise honed over decades of treating victims of terrorist attacks, Israeli doctors and nurses shared best practices with their American counterparts, including how to distribute the wounded to hospitals and methods to locate fragments deep in wounds.

On the day of the bombing, Alastair Conn, Mass. General’s chief of emergency services, acknowledged the value of that exchange, telling reporters, “We asked the Israelis to come across and they helped us set up our disaster team so that we could respond in this kind of manner.”

Israel’s training of Boston first responders spotlights one of the many ways the United States has benefited from bilateral cooperation with the Jewish state. The U.S.-Israel alliance contributes more than ever to American security. The strategic logic that first brought the two countries together to fight Soviet influence and counter radical Arab nationalism during the Cold War endures amid the current challenges of political Islam and violent extremism.

The U.S.-Israel relationship isn’t symmetrical, as the U.S. has provided Israel with indispensable economic and military support – to the tune of more than $115 billion since 1949. But it is a two-way street.

Israel has contributed to American “hard security” through counterterrorism cooperation, intelligence sharing and the development of such innovations as unmanned aerial vehicles and missile defense. And Israel also has contributed to America’s “soft security”: Advances in the high-tech, medical and sustainability sectors have helped maintain American economic competitiveness and promoted sustainable development.

With a high-tech community second only to Silicon Valley, Israel’s cooperation with U.S. companies on information technology has been crucial to their success. As Bill Gates observed in 2006, the “innovation going on in Israel is critical to the future of the technology business.”

Unsurprisingly, dozens of leading U.S. companies including Intel, IBM and Google have set up major research and development centers in Israel. Intel has a particularly strong presence, relying on Israeli engineers for the design of many of the company’s most successful microprocessors. Greg Slater, senior counsel and director of trade and competition policy for Intel, told a recent Washington Institute forum that “Israeli engineers saved the company” by pioneering energy-efficient technology that enabled increased capacity on each microchip.

Israel’s mushrooming start-up population has particular appeal for U.S. companies looking to expand or consolidate their technical edge, as evidenced by Google’s recent acquisition of the Israeli traffic navigation start-up Waze for a reported $1 billion.

Israeli innovators also have arrived at novel solutions to water and food security challenges, pioneering widely used techniques of conserving or purifying water, including drip irrigation and reverse osmosis desalination. According to the 2012 Cleantech Global Innovation Index, Israel leads the world in creating cleantech companies.

Israel’s success in producing clean technologies – born out of necessity from living in a hot, dry and oil-free environment – also has made important contributions to American water, food and energy security. Netafim, an Israeli manufacturer of drip-irrigation products, has a production facility in California and has captured half of the global market share in this key tool against the risk of climate change. Also in California, BrightSource Industries is building a solar power plant using Israeli technology that will double the amount of solar thermal electricity produced in America.

Naysayers suggest the alliance with Israel has not been cost-free for the United States, particularly in the Muslim and Arab world. But measured in empirical terms, Arab ties with the United States, at both the official and popular levels, have boomed in the past decade. Arabs are coming as students or visitors in record numbers; anti-American street protests have fallen dramatically since the start of the Iraq war in 2003; and defense cooperation with most Arab countries is closer than ever.

Sales of iconic American consumer brands also have soared during this period, despite occasional talk of boycotts, and overall U.S. exports to the Middle East increased to an all-time high of $56 billion in 2011. Conversely, oil exports to the United States from most Arab countries rose or remained steady since 2000, regardless of any political tensions.

Just as important, public opinion in every Arab or predominantly Muslim country polled has turned sharply against al Qaeda, notwithstanding the tight U.S.-Israel connection. Finally, Israel has been at most a very marginal factor in all the recent Arab uprisings. Even the new Muslim Brotherhood government in Egypt is maintaining the peace treaty with Israel and decent working relations with Washington.

As Israeli researchers, scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, doctors and others continue to help the United States promote nation-building at home and security and sustainability abroad, Washington can rest assured it will continue to benefit greatly from its alliance with Israel.

By helping to ensure that the United States maintains its global edge, Israel will continue to contribute to Americans’ lives and livelihoods, and to restoring the global economic competitiveness of the United States.

(JTA)

Computer Giant to Invest $5 Million in Israeli Education

Monday, November 5th, 2012

Computer giant Intel has announced that it will invest five million dollars (NIS 20 million) into Israeli high schools over the next four years, to provide advanced science, technology, engineering and math education to students in the “startup nation”.

The investment will initially be applied in 25 schools in southern Israel along with a budgeted NIS 50 million from the Ministry of Education to more than double the number of students graduating with science and technology diplomas.

During the six years between middle school and the completion of their high school educations, 4,000 students will receive guidance from representatives of Intel, who will encourage them to develop their skills in social media, gaming, video, and other areas of high-tech.

The program is expected to eventually include 200 schools.

Intel is Israel’s largest private employer.

Intel and Israeli Universities Team Up To Create “Human Brain” Applications

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

The IntelCollaborative Research Institute for Computational Intelligence, the Technion Institute in Haifa and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem will team up to  research technology that “learns” about the user, imitating the human brain, according to a report by Reuters.

The aim of the project is to create technology and applications which will assist people in their daily lives, “learning” about the needs and weaknesses of the user in order to compensate for them, providing reminders and helping to locate misplaced items.  The devices will become available in the next 2 to 3 years.

Apple Makes First Israeli Acquisition

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

After weeks of negotiations, computer mega-giant Apple has acquired its first Israeli company, Anobit Technologies, for $390 million.

Anobit, based in Herzliya, will develop high-performance flash-memory drive components for Apple’s ubiquitous iPhone and iPad.  The agreement was signed on January 6 and confirmed by Apple spokesman Steve Dowling on January 10.

Apple is also cultivating plans to open a semiconductor development center in Israel, a plan which is unrelated to the Anobit acquisition.

While the Anobit purchase is Apple’s first foray into the Israeli market, competitors Microsoft, Intel, and Hewlett-Packard already have labs and development centers in the country.  Intel opened its doors in Israel with five employees in 1974, according to Bloomberg business news, and now has 6,600 personnel in the country.  Microsoft’s Israeli research and development center opened in the spring of 2006.

Bloomberg reported that Israel has 60 companies featured on the Nasdaq Stock Market, the most of any country outside North America with the exception of China.  It is also home to the most startups per capita of any country in the world.

Israeli companies have been featured in several major international deals recently, including the sale of Israeli chip developer Zoran to the British makers of chips for Nokia Oyj mobile phones and the $307 million acquisition of Tel Aviv information technology firm Ness Technologies by Citi Venture Capital International.

Apple’s First R&D Center Outside of US in Israel

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Computer and software giant Apple has begun searching for office space for its first technology development center outside of Cupertino, California  – in Israel.

Real estate companies hired by Apple are on the lookout for 2,500 square feet for Apple’s first research and development facility outside the United States, which will employ 200 staff members. In 2010, Apple spent $2.4 billion on R&D, all in Cupertino, just 2 percent of its annual revenue.

Israel’s reputation as a hub for technology development will be bolstered by the company’s arrival, though powerhouses Microsoft and Intel have already been in country for more than a decade.

Apple is also poised to acquire Israeli chipmaker Anobit, a developer of flash memory for smartphones, tablet computers, and multimedia players.  The deal is expected to be worth $400-$500 million.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/apples-first-rd-center-outside-of-us-in-israel/2011/12/20/

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