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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Cairo’

Egypt Declares National Emergency, Military Coup Now Official

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

Egypt’s interim President Adly Mansour declared a month-long state of emergency Wednesday, putting the stamp on what the Obama administration has refused to call a military coup. Mansour “has tasked the armed forces, in cooperation with the police, to take all necessary measures to maintain security and order and to protect public and private property and the lives of citizen,” according to a statement from his office.

So far Wednesday, the police have “maintained security and order” by killing hundreds of people and wounding thousands other. Official estimates of the death toll keep rising and now are at approximately 100, but reports from independent journalists indicate the number is far higher.

A government official praised the security forces for “exercising self-control and high-level professionalism in dispersing the sit-ins” and blamed the Muslim Brotherhood for the “escalation and violence.” The Muslim Brotherhood urged Egyptians to take to the streets across the country to “stop a massacre.”

Al Jazeera‘s Rawya Rageh  reported from Cairo, “This battle is much bigger than what you’re seeing…[in] the casualties. This is a fight for the future of the country, and something that will determine the course of the Egyptian revolution that has been going on for two years now.”

 

US Closes Embassy in Cairo as Violence Spreads

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

The United States closed its consular services at its embassy in Cairo at 1 p.m. Wednesday as violence escalated across the country. At least two journalists, a cameraman for Sky News and a journalist from the United Arab Emirates, were gunned down.

In understated language, the U.S. Embassy stated, “As a matter of general practice, U.S. citizens should avoid areas where large gatherings may occur. Even demonstrations or events intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and possibly escalate into violence. U.S. citizens in Egypt are urged to monitor local news reports and to plan their activities accordingly.”

Stand-Off in Egypt, Morsi Supporters Prepared to Die

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Egyptian authorities have again canceled plans to disperse huge crowds of supporters for deposed president Mohammed Morsi, who have vowed to die rather than end their sit-in demonstration in Nasr city district of the capital and Nahda Square.

Morsi continues to be detained at an undisclosed location, and his detention has been extended by another 15 days.

The rallies by his supports have virtually shut down the city, but security officials insist they will disperse the protesters. One official claimed the scheduled Monday night maneuver to end the sit-in was called off because dispersal plans were leaked to the media.

Egyptian Government: No Deal with Muslim Brotherhood

Sunday, August 11th, 2013

Egyptian presidential media adviser Ahmed El-Muslimany has denied a report by Reuters that the government offered the Muslim Brotherhood ministerial posts, to release several of its jailed members and to unfreeze the group’s assets as part of a deal to end the political crisis, Egyptian state news agency MENA reported.

Reuters reported earlier, citing a military source, that the offer was made in exchange for the Brotherhood to end their sit-in protests.

The Muslim Brotherhood and its allies have been holding two large sit-ins in Cairo and Giza demanding former president Mohamed Morsi to be reinstated and have held daily rallies to voice their demands since June 28.

On July 3, the Egyptian military deposed Morsi and established a political roadmap in cooperation with the opposition, which calls for constitutional amendments, parliamentary and presidential elections.

Attack North of Cairo Kills Policeman, Wounds 29

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

One policeman was killed and at least 29 others were wounded Wednesday when an unknown attacker hurled a high-powered bomb, or possibly rocket-propelled grenades, at a  police station north of Cairo and near El Arish.

Shortly before, the Egyptian military called on people to rally on Friday against violence, in effect a call for a demonstration against the Muslim Brotherhood and its ousted president Mohammed Morsi.

Two pro-Morsi activists were killed earlier on Wednesday during a march.

Pro and Anti-Morsi Mobs Take to the Streets

Sunday, July 7th, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of supporters and opponents of ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi took to the streets Sunday as Egyptian Air Force planes flew overhead, underscoring the military’s overbearing presence since placing Morsi under virtual house arrest last week.

Adding to the uncertainty in the air was Sunday’s resignation of Justice Minister Ahmed Suleiman, who will remain as caretaker until a new cabinet is formed.

Salafist Muslim leaders said they would refuse to agree to the “coup, “which appears to be Egypt’s answer to the American impeachment process. Pro-Morsi supporters erected barricades near Cairo University and closed the main highway to the capital’s international airport.

Pro-Morsi supporters refuse to accept the appointment of Mohammed ElBaradei as president, who had been named as president by caretaker president Adly Mansour, whose office later said no decision has been made.

Morsi remains in custody and still insists he is the legitimate president of Egypt.

Nearly 100 Rapes in Four Days of Anti-Morsi Protests

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

Mobs protesting the rule of Mohammed Morsi have sexually assaulted nearly 100 women and raped at least 91  in the last four days of protests, Human Rights Watch reported.

Forty-six attacks took  place on Sunday, 17 on Monday and 43 on Tuesday, according to figures attributed to the Egyptian Operation Anti-Sexual Harassment/Assault, which operates a hotline for victims of sexual assault. The Nazra for Feminist Studies women’s rights group  reported that there were five similar attacks on Friday.

“The government response has been to downplay the extent of the problem or to seek to address it through legislative reform alone” Al Jazeera reported”

Several women required surgery after the attacks and some were beaten with metal chains and were stabbed.

Al Jazeera noted, “Sexual harassment has long been common in Egypt, but its increasing occurrence and ferocity has shaken the protest movement. A large number of women had fallen victim to gang assaults too in the square – the epicenter of 2011 revolution.”

An American television journalist was brutally gang raped in the protests against Hosni Mubarak two years ago.

Egyptian Army Turns Tables on Morsi: 48 Hours to Calm Opposition

Monday, July 1st, 2013

Egypt’s defense minister issued Muslim Brotherhood Mohammed Morsi a 48-hour ultimatum on Monday to reach an agreement with the opposition or face a military solution to the violence gripping the country. The ultimatum followed a dictate by the opponents that if Morsi does not quit within 24 hours, they will lead the second rebellion in the country in less than three years.

Defense Minister General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said the security of the country is being threatened following the death toll of at least 16 and the firebomb attacks on the headquarters of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo.

The Brotherhood guards fired at attackers, and at least five people were killed.

Al-Sisi insisted he was not planning another military regime, but he did into detail what he meant by a “roadmap” if Morsi and the opposition cannot reach an agreement, which deems to be highly doubtful.

The anti-government protests that reached a peak on Sunday and Monday are the largest since those that deposed Hosni Mubarak for power and ushered in elections that catapulted the radical Islamic Muslim Brotherhood into power.

Morsi promptly tried to usurp powers that quickly turned his administration into a clone of the Mubarak regime, denying freedom and promoting corruption.

The economy has collapsed and the government is nearly bankrupt, providing all of the fuel for another rebellion. The lack of a single leader to attract the support of Egyptians is an indication that the people prefer anarchy, making it ripe for the military to take over as it did in the interim period between Mubarak’s ouster and Morsi’s election.

Morsi told the London Guardian that if he were to bow to opposition demands and quit, protesters would be back in the street within a “week or a month.”

Given the gang rapes of foreign journalists that accompanied the protests against Mubarak and that occurred again this week in the growing rebellion against Morsi, and given the  breakdown of law and order and the Muslim war against the Christian Coptic sect, ultimatums and anarchy are the rule of the day in Egypt.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/egyptian-army-turns-tables-on-morsi-48-hours-to-calm-opposition/2013/07/01/

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