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December 8, 2016 / 8 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Knesset’

Knesset Approves Arrangements Act in Preliminary Vote 58 – 50

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

The effort to save the Jewish community of Amona from demolition and eviction has overcome its first big hurdle Wednesday afternoon, as the Knesset plenum passed the Arrangements Act by a vote of 58 to 50 with no abstention. The latest version of the bill, which now goes to deliberations in committee, lets the Arab claimants against Jewish settlements in Judea and Samaria to hold their title to the land while receiving market value compensation for it. The new law applies strictly to lands impounded by the Israeli government and not disputes over land that was settled without government sanction.

Finance Minister and Chairman of Kulanu Moshe Kahlon was reportedly uncertain whether his party should support the coalition bill, despite the fact that they were bound by “coalition discipline.” Kahlon was, and continues to be anxious about the possibility of a clash between the government and Israel’s Supreme Court, which is invested in seeing Amona, alongside the rightwing coalition, being brought down to their knees come December 25, the day decreed by the court.

Habayit Hayehudi Chairman and Education Minister Naftali Bennett, as well as Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked and the entire national religious faction refused to negotiate either the wording or the timing of the new legislation, which had been approved by the government on Sunday.

A spokesman for Habayit Hayehudi told Srugim, “Interestingly, what the prime Minster hasn’t been able to do for an entire year we suddenly managed to do in three days.”

However, both Minister Kahlon and Coalition Chairman David Bitan (Likud) warned that the bill would be suspended should it meet resistance from the Supreme Court.

JNi.Media

Bennett: If Law to Save Amona Fails, We’ll Stop Voting with Netanyahu Coalition

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

As the Arrangement Act, compelling Arab claimants against government initiated Jewish settlements to accept market value for their lands, comes up for an initial vote at the Knesset plenum, two coalition partners — Kulanu and Habayit Hayehudi — have accused Prime Minister Netanyahu and Coalition Chairman MK David Bitan (Likud) of attempting to sabotage the vote. Bitan announced on Tuesday that there may be some difficulties in rustling support for the bill.

In response, Habayit Hayehudi faction informed Bitan that should the coalition partners not honor the coalition discipline rule and help defeat the government-supported legislation, Habayit Hayehudi would no longer vote in support of future coalition bills.

The threat was intended to pressure Likud to make sure all the coalition partners indeed show up to support the bill. As of Tuesday night, there have been rumors that Kulanu and the Haredi parties were considering a no-show during the vote. Now it appears those rumors were manufactured on behalf of the PM, who never was in favor of the proposed law.

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court rejected a coalition request to postpone the demolition of Amona, in Samaria, on December 25.

David Israel

Bennett Defends Netanyahu Against Leftwing Attacks as Knesset Commemorates 21st Anniversary of Rabin’s Murder

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Opposition leader Isaac Herzog (Zionist Camp), on the occasion of the Knesset plenum’s commemoration of the 21st anniversary of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin’s assassination (12 Heshvan 5756, November 4, 1995), pointed a finger at Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday, saying, “the power of violence, the poison of racism, hatred and incitement mixed with silence were fertile ground for [Rabin’s] murder… You didn’t mean it, but you didn’t prevent it, either. The next murderers may already be walking among us, and the responsibility to stop them and to do everything in order to prevent the next murder lies first and foremost with you Mr. Prime Minister.”

Jabbing at Netanyahu’s notoriously thin skin in dealing with personal attacks from the media on himself and on his wife Sara, the Zionist Camp chairman said that Rabin “didn’t think the state belongs to him. He understood the rules of the democratic game and respected them. He knew that criticism against a prime minister isn’t personal persecution.”

An angry Education Minister Naftali Bennett then decided to put away his prepared remarks and directed his speech at Herzog. “You are trying to silence half of the population and blame them,” Bennett said. “For 21 years, the Left has been trying to blame Netanyahu for the incitement. Over and over Netanyahu said we disagree, but there should be no incitement. And now you’re trying to silence him.”

“We should not blame and point fingers. [Herzog] stood here and continued doing what [the Left] has done for 21 years. There was a dispute, but not for a moment did I doubt Rabin’s good intentions, and neither did Prime Minister Netanyahu. The phenomenon of hatred of individuals exists today, and we must all fight it.”

“It’s not a matter of Right or Left,” he added, noting that Rabin’s assassin “replaced his ballot with gunpowder. He will stay in prison until his dying day, but Israeli democracy will flourish.”

“Apart from the national, personal and familial tragedy, Yitzhak Rabin’s murder, whose background was political-ideological, remains as a deep wound in the gentle fabric of Israeli society,” Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein told the plenum.

“The murder separated between communities and formed high and fortified walls – walls of fear, of casting blame, of casting a collective moral stain on the one hand, and a sense of rejection and alienation on the other,” Edelstein said.

Turning to listeners from the national religious community, the Knesset speaker said, “Do not boycott, do not hold a grudge forever,” and to Israelis from the Left he said: “Don’t forever view an entire sector of the public as stained… Don’t exclude an entire part of the public from being part of the memory and learning lessons.”

Prime Minister Netanyahu said the murder is “a gaping wound in the body of the nation that heals and leaves a scar for generations.”

Netanyahu argued that while Rabin was “not a rightist, he was not the total opposite either, and on issues related to the state’s security, he represented a very broad common denominator within the nation.”

The prime minister mentioned Israel’s disagreements with the American government in the 1970s and said Rabin “was undeterred and was strongly opposed to a forced solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict, insisting on our security requirements and promoting the transfer of military aid to Israel.”

“Rabin sought peace and extended his hand for peace but fundamentally he understood that the establishment of peace needed to be done in a sober fashion and with responsibility,” Netanyahu said. “His insistence on security arrangements, even during his final speech, is exactly where I stand: the security arrangements to which even today the Palestinians do not agree.”

“Unfortunately, today Palestinian society continues to glorify murderers, and terror organizations announce again and again their intention to annihilate Israel. Like Rabin, we repeatedly extend our hand to them in peace and negotiations without preconditions,” Netanyahu told the plenum.

Netanyahu added that “the root of the storm sweeping the region now lies in the rise of radical Islam. Rabin frequently and explicitly named Iran as the state which fans the flames of this radicalism. He warned of Iran’s aspiration to develop a nuclear weapon, which today, through a variety of means, Israel has succeeded in preventing. He also pointed to Iran’s far-reaching aspirations to undermine the stability of our region.”

“Not much has changed since then and if it has, then it is for the worse,” the PM stated. “The Iranian regime has repeatedly stated its intention to eradicate Israel and Iran still has not abandoned its nuclear program. We will continue fighting the terror of Iran and its proxies and we will not allow it to arm itself with nuclear weapons or establish itself in Syria.”

Opposition leader Herzog addressed the election of US President Elect Donald Trump, saying that his election supposedly allows the Netanyahu government to “annex and build [at will], but actually this is the moment of truth for you (Netanyahu) and your government, for the plenum and for the entire nation… Our existential decisions are not derived from the identity of the person sitting in the White House, but from what where Jews should settle in order to preserve our Jewish and democratic home.”

Meretz chairwoman Zehava Galon directed her prepared comments at Netanyahu, saying: “You are not the victim of Rabin’s assassination. No one in the world gained as much from Rabin’s murder as you did. You owe your political existence to his murder.”

“I have no doubt that you didn’t want the murder to happen, but you released demons and proved that you have no problem releasing them again,” she stated. “Stop playing the victim and start taking responsibility for what you say and what your friends say.”

So, that “gaping wound in the body of the nation” is still pretty much gaping, 21 years later.

JNi.Media

Sundays Off Coming to Israel

Sunday, November 13th, 2016

A proposed Sunday law passed the Ministerial Legislation Committee today, and will now go to the Knesset for voting on Wednesday.

The proposed law states that six times a year Israelis will get a long weekend, with Sundays off, starting in 2017.

The six days off will correspond with days when schools are already off — during summer vacation and holidays, so that finally parent’s vacation schedules will correspond with school vacation schedules.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Former Jerusalem Grand Mufti at War with Knesset over Mosque Noise Pollution

Sunday, November 13th, 2016

“Anyone who is angered by the call of the muezzin, should leave,” Former Jerusalem Grand Mufti Sheikh Ekrima Sabri told worshipers at the Al Aqsa mosque on Friday, meaning, of course, leave the country. He suggested that “Israel has no right to intervene with the call of the muezzin, because it is contrary to freedom of worship.”

The Knesset’s Ministerial Legislative Committee on Sunday debates a proposed bill to ban muezzins from using mosque loudspeakers to call the faithful to prayer or to make religious or nationalistic announcements. Proposed by MK Moti Yogev (HaBayit HaYehudi), Merav Ben-Ari (Kulanu), and Miki Zohar and Nurit Koren (Likud), the bill explains that “hundreds of thousands of Israeli citizens routinely and daily suffer from the noise caused by Muazin calls at the mosques. The proposed law introduces a world view according to which freedom of religion must not damage the quality of life.”

Back in 2011, then MK Anastassia Michaeli (Yisrael Beiteinu) introduced the first “muezzin law,” requiring mosques to dial down the volume on the calls made over mosque PA systems at the five daily Muslim prayer times, but clarified that her bill does not intend to target any specific group. Michaeli said she came up with the bill after visiting the mixed cities of Lod and Ramla, where Jews have been complaining about the Muslims’ noisy devotion.

The original Muezzin bill was tabled and the Knesset ordered a report that said the use of loudspeakers began at about the same time as loudspeakers had been invented, and recommended a dialogue with the Muslim religious authorities rather than an environmental law.

But, judging by Sheikh Sabri’s recent statements, that the call to prayer is not just a Muslim ritual, but an act of worship, and that banning it would represent a violation of freedom of worship, a dialogue may not be in the cards.

MK Yogev’s bill, which has been in the works since 2015 and was tabled once, came back for a vote Sunday after several weeks in which residents of Pisgat Ze’ev in eastern Jerusalem yelled out muezzin calls at the top of their lungs one early morning in front of home of Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat, to share with him their daily experience, as well as the experience of the Jewish residents of the Shuafat, Beit Hanina and A-ram mixed Jerusalem neighborhoods.

“This morning we had to shatter the tranquility of Beit Hakerem in Jerusalem as part of our struggle with the muezzin noise [with] loudspeakers to emulate the sounds mosques disturbing thousands of families in the various neighborhoods of Jerusalem,” Yossi Davidoff, one of the protesters, told Ynet, noting that they started hollering only at 6 AM and not when the muezzins do it, at 5 AM and earlier, out of consideration for Mayor Barkat and his neighbors.

Police arrived shortly thereafter and removed the protesters for violating the same noise pollution laws that hundreds, even thousands of muezzins defy five times a day, every day, in Israel. Aryeh King, a member of the Jerusalem City Council, told TPS, “I brought Arab residents to testify at the Knesset, and they have said the same thing: ‘You live 500 meters away from the loudspeakers, but we live only 5 meters away.'”

“There is a ‘noise regulation’ law in Israel restricting the amount, duration, source and timing of noise (in the public sphere), and the muezzin calls are an infringement on that legislation,” King said, complaining that “over the last year, the muezzins have ramped up the volume to insane levels, not only for [prayer calls] but also for weddings and other celebrations.”

For his part, Sheikh Sabri was quoted as saying that the real noise pollution was the sound of Israeli military jets hovering in the Jerusalem sky, the sound of Israeli military tanks raiding Arab cities and villages, and the noise of bombs fired at Arab citizens. In other words, should this new law pass, a few muezzins will have to be rounded up and jailed, receiving rebuke from the US State Dept… No, wait, Trump was just elected US President.

JNi.Media

Public Security Minister: Israel Discriminates Against Jews on Temple Mount

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

The first Seekers of Zion conference, aimed at tightening the connection between the Jewish people and the Temple Mount, was held in the Knesset on Monday under the banner of “Jerusalem of Peace,” on the second anniversary of the assassination attempt on MK and Temple activist Yehuda Glick.

Minister of Public Security, Strategic Affairs, and Information Gilad Erdan (Likud) told the conference that “our right to the Temple Mount is indisputable, and no international entity can rewrite our history. The Temple Mount is the most sacred site to the Jewish nation and that cannot be changed.”

Having said that, Erdan admitted that “today’s status quo on the Temple Mount discriminates against the Jewish people. That is the truth. When I took office [the Waqf] limited the access of Jewish visitors on the Temple Mount based on racial and religious profiling, they came up close to them in an intimidating manner, let no one have any illusions about this — everything there was arranged, timed and paid for.”

“Together with the Prime Minister, the Defense Minister, and the cabinet, I led decisions to ban the Almoravid and Morabitat (separate male and female fanatical Islamic groups), and to ban the northern branch of the Islamic Movement,” Erdan continued. “My job is to secure the visitors ascending the Temple Mount, Jews, Christians and Muslims. The status quo discriminates against Jews. I’m glad there’s been a significant rise in the number of visitors on the Temple Mount.”

Turning to Glick, Minister Erdan said, “I think your victory, Yehuda, against those decrepit terrorists, is first of all the fact that more Jews are ascending the Temple Mount.” He added, “We believe that religion can be a source of reconciliation for people.”

Former MK Moshe Feiglin told the audience that “when we retreated in our hold on the Temple Mount, we retreated in our hold over the entire land.” He cited poet Uri Zvi Greenberg who wrote, “Whomever governs the mountain governs the land.”

Feiglin noted that when the nation lost its hold over the Temple mount, “we got the wave of knifings, we got a weakening of our hold on the rest of the neighborhood of Jerusalem, terrorist attacks in remote villages, rockets in Sderot, Beer Sheva and Tel Aviv, and our hold over the land continues to weaken.”

“Why the heck are we complaining against UNESCO who says we have no connection to the Mountain,” Feiglin asked, “when every Israeli government, especially this most recent one and especially this most recent prime minister are voting with their feet that we, indeed, have no ties to the mountain.”

Deputy Defense Minister Rabbi Eli Ben-Dahan (Habayit Hayehudi) called for the speedy arrangement of of Jewish prayer on the Temple Mount, and the sooner the better.

Conference speakers included Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein; Minister for Jerusalem Affairs, Ze’ev Elkin; Agriculture Minister Uri Ariel; Deputy Foreign Minister, Tzipi Hotovely; and Sheikh Ahmad Riyadh.

David Israel

Happy Aliyah (Election) Day

Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

What a strange coincidence.

As Americans go to the polls today to choose between bad and worse, Israel is celebrating Aliyah Day – if you don’t get the connection, don’t worry.

Enacted in June, today is the first Aliyah Day, which coincides with the day – the 7th of Cheshvan – when we actually begin praying for the rain to fall (the delay from when we should say the prayer is to give the pilgrims (olim l’regel) from Babylon time to return to Babylon – which seems somewhat contradictory for Aliyah Day).

But as it happens, in most years Aliyah day falls out in the week of Parshat Lech Lecha – when God tells Abraham to go to the Land of Israel.

That probably also happened on an Election Day in Ur Kasdim – “Vote for Nimrod or get the fiery furnace” – not much a great choice back then either.

JoeSettler

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/muqata/happy-aliyah-election-day/2016/11/08/

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