web analytics
October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Rudy Giuliani’

Giuliani Pitching Lhota as Only Candidate Ready to Be Mayor

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

The Republican mayoral hopeful couldn’t of chosen a better advocate, making the case for his candidacy, than former mayor Rudy Giuliani in his home turf – Staten Island. In a 30 minute speech to supporters, who gathered at a minimum of $175 per person at the Excelsior Grand in Staten Island, Mayor Giuliani pitched the case for Joe Lhota, whom he said is the most qualified person to serve as New York City’s next mayor.

“Joe understands the budget of the city in detail, from his work in my administration and from his work as a financial analyst, working on municipal finance for many years before he came to city government,” said Mayor Giuliani. “Joe brings with him a great deal of knowledge of the financial market and business. That’s what we need. Not these career politicians who have never really held a job. Like our president who really never held a job.”

“The Democratic candidates are going to be owned by the unions,” Mayor Giuliani said, as he turned to deny the Democratic candidates from obtaining the job at City Hall. “When I ran for mayor the slogan was: ‘With all the crime, all the deficits and all the unemployment, vote for me, you can’t do any worse.’ You know something? That slogan applies today. You can’t do any worse. And in fact you will do worse, a lot worse, if you don’t elect Joe Lhota.”

At another point of the speech, Mayor Giuliani referred to the Democratic candidates as being sold out to the unions or lack the conviction of dealing with the economic crisis. “We need an strong man with strong convictions as mayor of New York city. Not someone who’s going to change his mind just because one union yells very loud. Just because his opponents are saying: ‘oh, you didn’t the support the bill to give people all the money they want. Now you’re supporting the bill to give people all the money they want because you’re running for office.’ That alone should disqualify you for office,” said the mayor.

Mayor Giuliani also addressed Mr. Lhota’s ties to Staten Island, a stronghold for Republicans, especially in the primaries. “There are other Republican candidates. They have pluses. They have minuses. But as far of understanding Staten Island, none of them.. none of them.. comes close to Joe Lhota. He knows more about Staten Island than all of those Republicans combined X2.”

“But he can’t do it alone,” said Mr Giuliani.”Here is your job. You got to raise money for him… The rules are so difficult that we need a lot of people making small contribution in order to get the money that’s necessary to make Joe a viable candidate. Money is very very important. Because the message that I just gave to you here, is the message that people all over New York City have to hear. And if they do, he will be elected as mayor of New York City.”

Mr Giuliani also addressed the Boston Terror attack, the 9/11 attacks, public safety and the war on terror as a reason to put Mr. Lhota at the helm, in order to keep New York City a safe place to live in and avoid future terror attacks.

“New York City still is as we know, and as we have been reminded in the last couple of weeks, New York City still is the number one target of terrorism in this country,” Mr Giuliani said before turning the focus at Islamic terrorism in general. “There were some people in Washington, who when we captured Bin Laden thought that the war on terror was over. They even announced it. I believe that some of these attacks that have recently taken place, have taken place because there is in Washington a process of denial. A Process of not really understanding what is against us. It is almost silly to say that there is no war on terror, because the Terrorists are at war with us.”

So we need a mayor who’s going to be very strong about this. We need a mayor who is not going to be confused by so many of these liberal ideas that say: ‘Oh, I don’t know. Maybe we shouldn’t classify this person as an Islamic extremist terrorist. Maybe it will offend somebody if we do it’. We need a mayor who understands that from having been at my side virtually every moment for 40 days, from the moment the bombs hit until the moment we left office.”

Recalling Ed Koch’s Political Hypocrisy

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Now that the tributes to Ed Koch have abated, it behooves us to recall one of the less praiseworthy aspects of the former mayor’s character – his abject hypocrisy on race relations, particularly as they manifested themselves in his incessant criticism of Rudy Giuliani.

Giuliani was elected in 1993 to restore order and sheer livability to a city left adrift by Koch and made all the worse by Koch’s hopelessly overmatched successor, David Dinkins. (It may be difficult to recall more than two decades later, but Koch’s stock had plummeted to such depths in1989 that he lost the Democratic primary that year to the ineffectual Dinkins by a solid margin.)

Like Koch before him, Giuliani faced fierce resistance to his policies from the city’s self-styled community activists and black leaders. Giuliani, however, was far more successful than Koch in turning back decades of liberal fiscal and welfare experimentation that nearly bankrupted the city, as well as liberal social and law enforcement policies that left citizens cowering in fear behind bolted doors.

Koch certainly was an improvement over his two immediate predecessors, the liberal Democrat Abe Beame and the even more liberal Republican John Lindsay, but when Koch assumed office in 1978 the city’s economic house was already on its way to being put in order thanks to the efforts of politicians like Governor Hugh Carey and bankers like Felix Rohatyn.

Koch’s outsize personality, and his very public repudiation of the liberal pieties he himself had so slavishly subscribed to for decades, made him a popular figure in the city for the first two of his three terms in office. But he never got a handle on a skyrocketing crime rate and the entrenched municipal corruption.

That Giuliani managed to tame a city long characterized by many as “ungovernable” had to have bothered a man with Koch’s healthy self-regard. In short order Giuliani was being hailed as the best mayor the city had seen since La Guardia – and Koch was aligning himself with some very strange political bedfellows, most notably the Rev. Al Sharpton. (The Village Voice trumpeted Koch as the man “who made Al Sharpton kosher.”)

Koch became a chronic – some would say compulsive – critic of Giuliani. His criticism grew so predictable and mindless that the very title of a collection of his newspaper columns on the mayor – “Giuliani, Nasty Man” – had about it the whiff of parody.

With his new pal Sharpton in tow, Koch took particular delight in skewering Giuliani over his handling of racial issues. Koch no doubt hoped New Yorkers would forget just what a racial tinderbox the city had been during his own mayoralty.

The Harlem pastor Calvin Butts, for example, had labeled Koch “an instigator of the climate of racial fear in this city,” while CUNY professor Marshall Berman charged that Koch “has been remarkably adept at polarizing blacks and Jews.”

Koch reached a nadir in his campaign against Giuliani in October 1995. The UN was marking its fiftieth anniversary and Yasir Arafat was being feted all around town as a man of peace. When Giuliani learned that Arafat had been invited to a Lincoln Center concert to be performed by the New York Philharmonic, he dispatched aides to tell Arafat and his entourage to make themselves disappear from the premises.

Koch wasted no time in holding a joint press conference with David Dinkins (of whom Koch had once written, “I thought the city would be destroyed if we had to live through a second Dinkins term”) to denounce Giuliani.

“Mayor Giuliani,” Koch told reporters, “has behavioral problems dealing with other people.”

Giuliani took the criticism in stride, telling a UJA-Federation fundraising breakfast shortly after the controversy that he was “proud of that decision. I’d make it again, and the day I’d stop making it is the day I’d resign as mayor…. When I write my memoirs, this is one of the things that I probably will be proudest of.”

On that day Giuliani showed himself to be the kind of fearless politician Ed Koch once took such pride in being.

The Ambivalent Candidate

Wednesday, February 6th, 2008

Note to readers: Your faithful scribe was recently asked to become a regular contributor to Commentary magazine’s Contentions blog (go to www.commentarymagazine.com and click on the word “Contentions” in the blog section of the home page).

The blog’s list of past and present contributors includes, among others too numerous to mention, John Podhoretz and Norman Podhoretz, Edward Alexander, Hillel Halkin, Victor Davis Hanson, Joshua Muravchik, Peter Wehner and Ruth R. Wisse; needless to say, it’s an honor to be in such heady intellectual company.

This week’s column originated, in slightly different form, as this contributor’s maiden posting for Contentions.

The amazing implosion of Rudy Giuliani’s presidential campaign will be analyzed and argued about for years to come. The Monitor’s own take, hardly original and admittedly based on nothing more than informed speculation, is that he simply was ambivalent about the whole enterprise to begin with.

Anyone who witnessed Rudy’s unforgettable eight-year turn as mayor of New York knows that when Rudy really wants something, he’s tenacious and single-minded about getting it. He’ll fight anyone and anything standing in his way, conventional wisdom and political nicety be damned.

And that’s exactly the Rudy we didn’t see in this campaign, from his surprisingly languid acknowledgment to Larry King in Feb. 2007 that yes, he was in the race, to his strangely subdued performance in what turned out to have been his last presidential debate in Florida last week.

It’s been suggested, by some who harbored a certain level of skepticism about the depth of Rudy’s commitment to a presidential run, that perhaps Rudy thought a tentative campaign, particularly in a year that looked, at least early on, like a washout for the GOP, would raise his profile to an even higher degree and be beneficial for business – i.e., for Giuliani Partners and his already astronomical speaking fees.

Perhaps there’s some truth to that, but lacking access to the inner workings of his psyche, the Monitor can only go back to that earlier suggestion about ambivalence. Part of him liked the idea of being president, of attempting to replicate his success in New York on a national level, but another part of him wasn’t so sure. If the presidency were handed to him, yes – but the gritty day-to-day work of campaigning for office had never been his strong suit.

That much was obvious from his first, mistake-prone and unsuccessful run for mayor in 1989 as well as his victorious second effort in 1993. Andrew Kirtzman, in his highly readable and balanced book Rudy Giuliani: Emperor of the City, described candidate Giuliani on the campaign trail in 1993:

“Other politicians could lose themselves in the moment when working a crowd, but Giuliani never lost the look in his eye that said all this was a just a means to an end…. When he spoke before a crowd he didn’t romance them or flatter them or try to seduce them. Rather, he argued his case; a lawyer making his final summation. He was all prose and no poetry.”

In 1997, Rudy could have shut himself up inside Gracie Mansion and still won reelection, such was his record of accomplishment in his first term of office and the mediocre opposition he faced in Manhattan borough president Ruth Messinger. So 1997 offered no real test of his campaigning skills.

But, certainly in retrospect, his short-lived run for U.S. Senate in 2000 was in many ways a precursor to his near-somnolent presidential bid seven years later. Kirtzman titles the chapter in his book about that campaign “The Reluctant Candidate” and describes the tenor of the campaign in the late winter and early spring of 2000 – before Rudy’s health and marital issues took him out of the running:

“…Giuliani had barely deigned to mount a campaign. While [Hillary] Clinton was well on her way to visiting all sixty-two of New York State’s counties, he’d hardly traveled outside the city. While she was honing her message, he’d barely issued a position paper. Inside his camp, meetings weren’t being held, polls weren’t being taken…. The mayor acted as though he were entitled to the Senate seat, and he didn’t seem to want it all that much.”

In The Prince of the City, his fine study of the Giuliani mayoralty, unabashed Rudy admirer Fred Siegel wrote of the widespread surprise at “Giuliani’s lukewarm approach to a Senate race that had much of the country abuzz.”

Giuliani, wrote Siegel, “seemed to want the job but only if it meant he didn’t have to miss too many Yankee games or campaign too often in the frigid areas of upstate.”

Sound familiar?

Giuliani Gives Anti-Semitism Conference An Earful

Saturday, July 26th, 2003

President Bush’s choice of Rudy Giuliani to head the United States delegation to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s first-ever conference on anti-Semitism was an inspired one. Not only did Giuliani, in typically straightforward, no-nonsense fashion, get to the heart of the problem in his comments, but his celebrity status drew extraordinary media attention to an otherwise ho-hum affair.

Terming Europe’s anti-Semitic past “a burden that has held Europe back for two millennia,” the former New York City mayor urged the adoption of a comprehensive plan including the adoption of hate crimes legislation and a uniform method of gathering statistics on anti-Semitic attacks. He also called for the introduction of educational programs against anti-Semitism, and a mechanism to immediately refute anti-Semitic lies such as the canard that Jews drink the blood of Christians or that Jews were absent from the World Trade Center on 9/11.

When goaded by reporters as to whether the Israel/Arab dispute is driving anti-Jewish sentiment in Europe, Giuliani pointedly said, “Anti-Semitism has a long history that predates the whole issue of Palestine, and I don’t see how a resolution of that is going to end anti-
Semitism.”

Splendid, Rudy.

Bravo, Mr. Mayor

Friday, November 16th, 2001

Once again, Rudy Giuliani has demonstrated why his tenure as Mayor of New York these past years marked a transformation of our city. There are those who say that he should have accepted the $10 million for the World Trade Center victims fund from that Saudi prince who accompanied his check with the advice that the United States “should re-examine its policies in the Middle East and adopt a more balanced stance toward the Palestinian cause. Our Palestinian brethren continue to be slaughtered at the hands of the Israelis while the world turns the other cheek.” They said the Mayor should just have issued a disclaimer.

However, in typical Rudy style, the Mayor, getting to the heart of the matter said, upon rejecting the money, that this sort of thinking “is part of the problem… There is no moral equivalent to this attack. There is no justification for it… To suggest that there is any justification for it only invites this happening in the future.”

Of course, the Mayor was right. Taking the money would ineluctably serve to give credence both to the prince's substantive remarks and to the notion there is some political dimension to what happened. And, as the Mayor said, this could only encourage other such terrorist outrages. Thus, in no way was he going to allow the $10,000,000 to buy identification with the solution.

The Mayor's principled and clearheaded stance stands in stark contrast to what some in the State Department are saying. We were dismayed to read that a spokesman, Richard Boucher, drew this distinction:

Essentially, there are, on some planes, two different things. One is that there are violent people trying to destroy societies, ours, many others in the world. The world recognizes that and we are going to stop those people. On the other hand, there are issues and violence and political issues that need to be resolved in the Middle East, Israelis and Palestinians…. They are clearly issues that are different.

Can such talk have any other effect than to embolden the worldwide terrorist enterprise and encourage Osama bin Laden's allies to commit violence against America's closest ally?

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/editorial/bravo-mr-mayor/2001/11/16/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: