web analytics
September 30, 2014 / 6 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Shiloh’

I’ll Never Forget My Panic When My Kids Didn’t Get Home on Time

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

I’d go through such panic when waiting past the “should be home by now” time in the days my kids commuted to school and even work, while living at home here in Shiloh.

So I would just hate to be in the shoes of those three lovely families who are waiting almost two weeks already for their sons, brothers, nephews, grandson’s etc. to be released by terrorists and allowed home to continue their ordinary lives.

We’ve been living in Shiloh for almost thirty-three years, and from that first year until my fourth child finished junior high school over fourteen years later, there was usually at least one who was commuting daily. Not only was this before the days of cellphones, but for the first year we lived in Shiloh, we didn’t have a phone in the house and for the first few months there wasn’t even one in the neighborhood.  Talk about isolation…. As busy as I was as a mother of young children and working at various outside jobs I’d be counting the minutes, then the seconds until their expected returns home. If the expected time had passed, I’d begin to panic. I certainly never would have needed colonic irrigation during those years.

My joy and relief at children’s safe return was like the daily dropping of the “New Year’s Ball” at Times Square. A safe uneventful trip was not something I or my children could take for granted. My kids experienced traffic accidents and terror attacks. Sometimes the stories were even humorous, but most of the delays had more unpleasant reasons.

More than once I’d find myself contacting security to ascertain if it was known where the vehicle transporting them could be. Just before cellphones became the norm, there was a communications service, Kesher Binyamin, in which members had an open speaker from which they heard announcements and could verbally answer. One evening a couple of hours after I had expected my daughter’s return, I called her employer who confirmed that she had left on time, so I contacted security.  They sent out an alert asking if anyone had seen her. That’s how we tracked her down. The car’s driver had done a couple of mitzvot and errands on the way home which was the reason for the delay. Once I knew she was safe, I, and my kishkes, could calm down.

Another time, my son wasn’t home long after he should have been from junior high school in Beit El. I saw the neighbor’s son home. He didn’t remember if mine was on the school bus, so I ran over to other neighbors to ask what to do and see if their son had seen him.  That’s where I found my son; he was watching tv with his friend. After getting off the bus, he went there to bring the homework assignment to his friend who hadn’t been in school that day. My neighbors apologized profusely for not realizing that he hadn’t been home yet.

Baruch Hashem, thank G-d, my stories all end happily. Let’s all pray that there will be safe and happy returns home for Gilad Michael Ben Bat Galim, Yaccov Naftali Ben Rachel Devora and Eyal ben Iris Teshura.

Visit Shiloh Musings.  / Batya Medad

Right Meets Left at Princeton Jewish Center

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

“Israel’s enemies have refocused their efforts to target the weakest link–American Jewry,” Marc Prowiser, Director of Security Projects for the One Israel Fund, told a gathering in Princeton Monday evening, June 16.

Prowiser, who spoke at the The Jewish Center of Princeton (TJC), was brought, according to an email from the TJC president, as part of an effort to “provide a range of perspectives on Israel.”

Prowiser said he was disappointed that TJC did not invite him to debate the executive vice president of the New Israel Fund, who will speak Wednesday evening.

Declining membership at TJC, a conservative congregation located in a central New Jersey town dominated by the University and liberal left thinking, includes a number of resignations from longtime members due to TJC’s waning support for pro-Israel programming.

America’s view of Israel, said Prowiser, a security expert who has lived in Shiloh for more than two decades, is the result of intentional “misinformation and manipulation by the media.” Jews of the Yishuv—a biblical word that loosely translates to ‘settlement’ and the source for much international misrepresentation—are “hated for something that does not exist.”

Prowiser, a compact well-spoken Israeli sporting jeans and boots, himself belies the media’s portrayal of the “settler” as someone clad in black with “long payos and an axe.”  Shiloh, is located in Israel’s Shomron region. TJC congregant Nelson Obus described the town as “Levittown but nicer.”  It also happens to be the first Biblical city to house the Mishkan (or Ark of the Covenant). More than 700,000 Jews currently reside in Judea and Samaria.

Prowiser, who favors a One-State solution for Israel where Arabs are welcome but “citizenship is earned,” spent much of the evening fielding questions.

On the security fence, Prowiser said he preferred to take it down as soon as possible but “would fight terror without mercy.”

Responding to a final query from the only teen in the room, Prowiser told him: “if you are for freedom and democracy and you are not for Israel, you are a hypocrite.”

Housing Minister Ariel: Words Versus Facts on the Ground

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

Whom are we to believe? Housing Minister Uri Ariel or the regional heads of Judea and Samaria?

Poster  I photographed at Tzomet (Junction) Shiloh signed by Judea-Samaria regional heads claiming a second Netanyahu building freeze is in effect at present.

Housing (Construction) Minister Uri Ariel of the NRP aka Jewish Home Party, who campaigned that in the cabinet/coalition he and his party head Naftali Bennett could best guarantee the growth and building of yishuvim, is quoted saying:

“There will be no more freezes, we will not accept delays and restrictions in Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria, and we will continue to build in all parts of our country,” said Ariel. “Jerusalem will not be divided again. Between the Jordan and the sea there will be only one state, and that is the State of Israel.”

But facts on the ground are the opposite according to the signers of this poster.

Hahakpa’ah ha shniya shel Netanyahu zeh chonek otanu.The second building freeze of Netanyahu, it’s choking us.

That’s what is written on black on the poster bottom. It is signed by those who head the various regions, counties, Jewish cities in Judea and Samaria.

As I have written before, there is still a waiting list to get into many yishuvim, such as Shiloh, because of the severe housing shortage. In recent years there has been a demand for multifamily homes for various reasons. One is that they can be less expensive than single-family homes and the other is that people are now building rental apartments or granny apartments on their houses which quite often use the basement, making the house three, rather than two stories, which necessitates a change in zoning which isn’t granted. Another reason is that some of the yishuvim are now extremely limited in available land for building new homes. When yishuvim were first built, the norm was to only build single family homes, and the standard building limit was two stories in many locations, such as Shiloh. Changing this basic regulation has proven very complicated for many people and communities.

As I’ve written many times before, cabinet/coalition members of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s government do not have much power. He doesn’t poll them before making policy decisions. They are more like window-dressing and have to pledge to support his government to be accepted in the coalition. Building in Judea and Samaria to meet its needs won’t happen with Bibi’s government still trying to give the Arabs our Land to make an Arab terror state, aka Palestine.

Today is Jerusalem Day, so expect to hear all sorts of great speeches, but the truth is that we (the State of Israel) are still not sovereign in the Land of Israel and even in Jerusalem.

Visit Shiloh Musings.  / Batya Medad

Yom Ha’atzma’ut Explosion of Joy 66

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Many Israeli communities celebrate Yom Ha’Atzma’ut with fireworks, and Shiloh is no exception. Decades ago, when we were living in Bayit V’Gan Jerusalem, only the big national and municipal ceremonies had such impressive displays. We could see the fireworks at Mount Herzl from our apartment and later on, when the trees got taller, from the roof of the building.

As is our custom here in Shiloh, we greet the festive day, making the transition from Memorial Day to celebrating Independence Day in the Mishkan (Tabernacle) Shiloh Synagogue when everyone comes to pray together, no matter which of the many Shiloh synagogues we normally pray in. First we pray Mincha, the afternoon prayer and then while waiting for nightfall, Rav Elchanan Bin-Nun gives an inspiring sermon. After that begins the Evening Prayer, Aravit which includes dancing and singing plus a long shofar blowing to remind us that the siren is modeled on the Jewish Biblical shofar.

 

I’m optimistic that things here in Israel will get better and better. It’s really up to us. That’s the “hope,” “Hatikvah,” which is based on faith in G-d. HaTikvah.jpg

Shiloh’s Children Hard at Work Baking Matzohs

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

Even as their parents are scrubbing and fixing and rearranging their homes in time for Passover, children in the Jewish community of Shiloh are working as well – making matzohs.

The community, located in the Binyamin region near Samaria, has a 20-year tradition of allowing its children the privilege of baking matzohs just before the Passover holiday.

During the process the children learn the special laws of the holiday while enjoying the practical aspects of preparing matzohs.

The original ancient city of Shiloh, mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, is situated at the modern Khirbet Seilun, south of Tirzah, 10 miles north of the Jewish community of Beit El in Samaria (Shomron).

Shiloh was the official capital of the ancient nation of Israel before the First Holy Temple was built in Jerusalem. It was located north of Beit El and is mentioned in the Book of Joshua and in Judges.

Air Force Airlifts Generators for Blacked-out Towns in Samaria

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

The Israeli Air Force has airlifted generators to end an electricity blackout in the Jewish communities of Itamar and Shiloh in Samaria (Shomron.)

The two towns, along with several other smaller communities, have been without electricity since last Thursday because of the savage storm that crippled Israel with more than three feet of snow and torrential rains in low-level areas. Teams of repairmen have been working around the clock to restore the electrical supply to all the hundreds of disconnected homes.

Aharon Katsof, a resident of Aish Kodesh in the Binyamin region of Samaria, told Tazpit News Agency, “We have been without power for five days.  We have been using wood for heat, and gas for cooking. We also lost our water supply, so we melted snow for water. During the first days we had a problem with food supplies, and we were completely cut off.

“At some point the army began to provide us with food. Those who had wood-heating hosted those families who had none. We had communal meals. Today, most cars were dug out of the snow, and so we can get in and out; the siege has been broken.”

Archaeologists Find Shiloh Altar Used During Temple Era

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

A dramatic discovery at the ancient site of Shiloh, located in Samaria, provides the first–ever evidence that it continued to be a religious center after it was destroyed by the Philistines and Jews returned to the city, home of the Tabernacle.

The altar is thought to have been used to offer sacrifices even after the First Temple was built in Jerusalem.

The stone from the Iron Age, coinciding with the period of the first kings of Israel, was found in a wall built later in the Byzantine period.

Archaeologists think that Byzantines took the stone altar from its original site, which might have been in the same location as the Tabernacle. There are two conflicting theories on its location, one stating it is on the northern side of ancient Shiloh and the other placing it on the southern side.

Avital Faleh, administrator of the Tel Shiloh site, told The Jewish Press Wednesday that the wall was on the southern side and that it is more reasonable that the Byzantines carried the altar from nearby rather than several hundred yards, which would be the case if the Tabernacle were located on the northern side.

The stone was measured at two feet by two feet and almost 16 inches high.

Other altars used for sacrificial worship during the First Temple era have been discovered in Be’er Sheva and near Arad in the south and in Tel Dan and near Shiloh in the north. Faleh explained that the stone altar is almost identical with others that have been discovered.

The revelation on Tuesday of the discovery at Shiloh is the first evidence of post-Tabernacle sacrificial worship at the same site where the Bible states the first Tabernacle was erected after the Jews entered Israel following the Exodus from Egypt and the 40 years of living in the Sinai.

Joshua 18:1 states, “The whole congregation of the children of Israel assembled together at Shiloh and erected there the Tent of Assembly, and the land was conquered before them.” The Tabernacle remained at Shiloh for 369 years, according to the Talmud.

The Philistines went to war against the Jews, destroyed the city, and captured the Holy Ark. The Tabernacle probably had been removed before the end of the war but was not used when sacrificial offerings were later offered at two other places, Nov and Gideon, until King Solomon built the First Temple.

However, it took years before Jewish communities, especially Shiloh that was the home of the first sacrifices Israel, adjusted to the cultural and religious change.

In July, archaeologists  said they believed they discovered the remains of the Biblical tabernacle site, after finding holes carved into the rock and which may have been used to hold beams for the Tabernacle.

The Jewish Press reported here in January, that the discovery of  an uncovered broken clay pitcher, embedded in a layer of reddish ashes, is from the time of the devastation of Shiloh, offering detailed evidence of the destruction.

Shiloh was the most significant religious center for Israel before the Philistines destroyed it. The Jewish people offered mandatory sacrifices, and it was there that lots were cast for tribal areas and the cities of the Levites.

Deuteronomy 12:4-7, states,  “You should not do any [act of sacrificial worship] to God, your God, other than at the site which God, your God will choose, to place His Name there, from amongst all your tribes. You should seek out His dwelling [place in the Tabernacle at Shiloh] and come there. You should bring there your burnt offerings, and your [obligatory peace] offerings, your tithes, [first fruits] lifted from your hand [by the priests]—your vows, your pledges, and the firstborn of your cattle and of your sheep [which are to be given to the priests]. [It is] there that you should eat [your sacrifices] before God your God. Then you and your households will rejoice in all the work of your hands. [You should bring offerings according to the means with] which God, your God, blesses you.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/archaeologists-find-shiloh-altar-used-during-temple-era/2013/11/20/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: