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August 28, 2016 / 24 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘African’

Netanyahu First Israeli PM in Decades to Visit African Countries

Monday, July 4th, 2016

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is leaving on an historic visit to Africa Monday, after decades in which no Israeli prime minister has visited the continent. The Prime Minister has set improving and strengthening relations with African countries as a goal; he will visit Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda and Ethiopia.

On the occasion of Prime Minister Netanyahu's visit, the National Information Directorate has designed a special logo featuring the flags of the countries on his itinerary.

On the occasion of Prime Minister Netanyahu’s visit, the National Information Directorate has designed a special logo featuring the flags of the countries on his itinerary.

Prime Minister Netanyahu’s visit to Africa will begin in Uganda where President Yoweei Museveni will welcome him in an official ceremony with a 19-gun salute (21-guns is for presidents). Afterwards, an official ceremony will be held at Entebbe to mark 40 years since the Entebbe raid.

Later the Prime Minister will meet with East African heads of state who are traveling to Uganda especially for a diplomatic meeting with him. Participating in the meeting will be Ugandan President Museveni, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, Rwandan President Paul Kagame, South Sudan President Salva Kiir Mayardit, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn Boshe, Zambian President Edgar Lungu and Tanzanian Foreign Minister Dr. Augustine Philip Mahiga. Prime Minister Netanyahu will also visit Kenya, Rwanda and Ethiopia where he will hold meetings with their heads of state and security and economic leaderships. He will make an historic speech before the Ethiopian Parliament.

Beyond its diplomatic aspects, Prime Minister Netanyahu also has major economic significance. The Prime Minister will be accompanied by approximately 80 businesspeople from 50 companies, all eager to establish commercial ties with African companies and countries. Last week the Netanyahu cabinet passed a $13 million plan to strengthen economic links and cooperation with African countries.

Economic seminars will be held in Kenya and Ethiopia with the participation of the traveling businesspeople and their local counterparts. The seminars are under the auspices of Kenyan President Kenyatta, Ethiopian Prime Minister Desalegn Boshe and Prime Minister Netanyahu.

JNi.Media

Ethiopian MK Meets Visiting African Women, Advocates Merging Israeli Tech with ‘Fertile African Soil’

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

MK Avraham Neguise (Likud) on Monday met at the Knesset with a delegation of prominent women from several African countries, including women from academia and education, as well as members of parliament, members of political parties and one journalist.

The African delegation is visiting Israel as part of the UN Women initiative, established in 2010 by the United Nations General Assembly and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women. UN Women – Africa, one of the largest branches of this initiative, works to “support regional gender-responsive measures to promote women’s leadership and participation in politics, government, business and society and to influence regional and national legal frameworks and policies to increase women’s leadership and political participation.”

MK Neguise noted that the 20th Knesset includes a record number of women members, and encouraged his guests “as leaders in your countries, to continue with your activity.”

Neguise, an Ethiopian Israeli, told the women that as MK he works to strengthen relations between Israel and Africa. To this end, he recently established the Lobby for Relations between Israel and African Countries, which he heads. Neguise also chairs the parliamentary friendship groups of Israel and Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, and Rwanda.

“I believe that the meeting between Israeli technology and the fertile African soil can effect change in Africa and strengthen the ties between Israelis and Africans,” Neguise told the delegation members, pointing out Israel’s advanced capabilities in the fields of irrigation, desalination, solar energy, medicine, education and tourism. “If we develop cooperation in these fields, both Israelis and Africans will benefit,” he promised.

Neguise, who serves as chairman of the Knesset Committee for Immigration, Absorption and Diaspora Affairs, noted the importance of Jewish immigration to the strengthening of Israeli society, and said part of the committee’s duty is to advance equal opportunities for recent immigrants in education, employment and housing. He noted that part of the challenge stems from the fact that 90 percent of Ethiopians who immigrated to Israel came from rural areas, “so there are economic, cultural and professional gaps.” In order to narrow these gaps, he said, Israel provides after-school classes for Ethiopian students, vocational training for adults and housing assistance for immigrant families.

While in Israel, the African delegation members are taking part in a leadership course organized by Israel’s Agency for International Development Cooperation, a division of the Foreign Ministry. The course is being held in cooperation with Singapore.

Click here for a list of the African delegation members.

JNi.Media

Hamas Tried to Switch Missing Israeli with Eritrean

Friday, July 17th, 2015

A few weeks after Avraham Mengitso entered Gaza on his own, Israel approached Hamas via an intermediary, asking Hamas to return Mengitso to Israel on humanitarian grounds.

Hamas agreed, and sent Mengitso over to the border crossing with Israel.

Only, the man Hamas sent over wasn’t the missing Israeli, according to Channel 2.

Hamas sent over an Eritrean infiltrator who had entered Gaza from the Sinai, and tried to pass him off as the missing Israeli of Ethiopian origin.

The IDF immediately realized that Hamas was trying to pull a fast one on them, and sent the doppelganger back to Gaza.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Government Failure, NGO Support, Fan Illegal Migrant Flame

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

The past few days in Israel have seen a well organized protest campaign of thousands of illegal African migrants, mostly from Eritrea and the Sudan, on the roads, in front of the Knesset, and in a park in central Tel Aviv. The demonstrations, on behalf of an estimated 50,000 illegal migrants, is coordinated with the hunger strike of some 130 prisoners in Saharonim prison, who are slated for deportation to their home countries.

Meanwhile, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) representative in Israel Walpurga Englbrecht blasted Israel’s new semi-open Holot facility in the south, saying it is a detention center for all intents and purposes.

She’s right, of course. Israel is facing a major social and demographic crisis, begun in the 1990s, as local wars in the Horn of Africa began to result in poverty and hunger, driving out hundreds of thousands of people in search of work. This influx of cheap, illegal labor happened just in time to fill in for the missing Arab workers from the newly created Palestinian Authority, whose entry into Israel was being curbed because of rampant terrorism.

In a manner reminiscent of the illegal Mexican migrant workers situation in the American South West until about the market crash of 2008, Israeli business, especially agriculture, but industry as well, cultivated the illegal African migration.

She’s also selective in her view of the migrant worker crisis in the region. While Israel to date has deported some 13,000 Africans out of an estimated 60,000, all them leaving willingly, according to the authorities—Saudi Arabia has been forcibly deporting more than half a million legal migrants, against their will, back to their home countries across the region.

One of the reasons may be that while the Sudanese and Eritreans in the Israeli democracy enjoy the right to assemble and the right to demonstrate – similar behavior would land them in prison, if not worse, in The Kingdom.

Englbrecht was also correct in pointing out that Israel acted in a most unprofessional and irresponsible manner in its treatment of the influx of migrants. “The Israeli government awarded temporary shelter to many Eritreans and Sudanese, but for many of them their status is being changed drastically,” she told the Army Radio. “One of the problems was that these people have never been processed properly, to discover if they were refugees or employment seekers.”

Englbrecht said Israel had made a big mistake by not discovering early on why these Africans had left their countries, and why had they crossed three different borders on the way.

What she didn’t mention was the fact that, on top of mishandling the illegal migrants, as supply began to outweigh the demand for labor in Israel, Israel was also neglecting and mistreating Israel’s poorest citizens, whose neighborhoods were eventually invaded by a myriad unemployed, uneducated, downtrodden foreigners.

At that point, under the poor management of a succession of governments run by Labor, Likud, Kadima and Likud again, the true magnitude of Israeli suffering under the lawless rule of these supposed “refugees” was being swept under the rug.

An African illegal sleeping on the ground in a south Tel Aviv playground. Photo credit: Abir Sultan/Flash 90

An African illegal sleeping on the ground in a south Tel Aviv playground. Photo credit: Abir Sultan/Flash 90

An NGO named Eitan-Center for Israeli Immigration Policy, documented an astonishing history of official lies about illegal acts committed by Africans against Israel’s most defenseless population: the working poor and the elderly, by and large of Sephardi descent, were stuck, economically immobilized, in perpetual purgatory.

Yori Yanover

Title: Alone in Africa

Friday, November 9th, 2012

Author: Avigail Sharer
Publisher: Israel Bookshop Publications

Alone in Africa, by Avigail Sharer, is an original adventure story about three siblings named Nesanel, Penina and Chezky Feiner, who are, well, alone in Africa. Except they aren’t entirely alone – they have animals and two battling African tribes to keep them company.

It all started when the three Feiner kids were flying from home in London without their parents to visit their grandparents in South Africa. The airport-provided chaperon was a rookie teenager who didn’t know what to do when the airplane made an emergency landing in the jungle. The kids became separated from the other passengers, who were driven away by military Jeeps to the airport. That is how they became “alone in Africa.”

They were found by an African tribe named the Lulu was who thought that Nesanel was a prophet named Gift of G-d. The other children escaped, but Nesanel was kept. When Nesanel attempted to escape, his plan was foiled when he was captured by a different African tribe named the Bakayas, who were at war with the Luluwas. There was a rescue attempt by Penina and Chezky, but was it successful?

I liked Alone in Africa for a number of reasons. The plot was fast-paced and full of twists and turns; at one moment they were wandering through the jungle, the next moment they were captured. My personal favorite part of this book was the idea of a non-poisonous, poisonous frog (when you read it you’ll know). The story is also very informative about survival skills. I would recommend Alone in Africa to potential jungle explorers of ages 9-10 who are ready to tackle a chapter book of over 230 pages.

Shmuel Holczer

IDF Chief: Israel-Egypt Border Will Continue to be Security Problem

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Following the death of Cpl. Netanel Yahalomi in a gunbattle on the Israel-Egypt border on Friday, Israel Defense Forces Chief of Staff Lieutenant General Benny Gantz warned that the perimeter would continue to be a security problem for Israel.

Speaking at the site of Yahalomi’s death on Sunday, Gantz said that while “we are fighters who are protecting our borders,” the border with Sinai “will continue to challenge us.”

“An enormous effort has been made over the past two years to close off the border, and it will be closed off, but even once it’s closed, the threat will not stop,” Gantz said.

Yahalomi was killed at the Mount Harif border region in a firefight with a jihadist group calling itself Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis.  The group claimed to have killed the Israeli soldier in response to the video “The Innocence of Muslims” made in the US by a private movie maker, mocking founder of Islam, Mohammed.

The group also claimed responsibility for an attack at Ein Netafim on the border, which killed eight Israelis in August 2011.

Initial reports indicate that the terrorists who fired on Yahalomi hid in an area near a group of African infiltrators attempting to breach the border to Israel.   IDF investigators say Yahalomi’s force may have been attacked while a larger part of the unit went to get water for the illegal immigrants.

Malkah Fleisher

African Migrants Stuck at Egypt-Israel Border

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

A group of some 20 African migrants is trapped between Israel’s border fence with Egypt and Israeli soldiers who have been ordered not to let them in.

The soldiers reportedly are providing water to the migrants, who as of Tuesday had been there for five days. The migrants, who include a pregnant woman, have refused to be sent back to Egypt.

Last month, a group of migrants stuck along the border was allowed to enter Israel after four days. They were sent to a holding facility for illegal migrants.

Humanitarian organizations have called on Israel to allow the migrants to enter and apply for asylum.

JTA

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/african-migrants-stuck-at-egypt-israel-border/2012/09/05/

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