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July 29, 2015 / 13 Av, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘boeing’

El Al Flight Returns to Israel Half Way to JFK

Thursday, June 18th, 2015

The airline apparently thought it could save some money by not paying for expensive ground time at JFK

An El Boeing 747-400 plane carrying 342 passengers to New York turned back to Israel early Thursday after indications of low oil pressure in one engine. Safety apparently was not a consideration for flying to Israel since the plane could have reached JFK in the same amount of time.

The passengers and crew landed safely at Ben Gurion Airport five hours later.

Flight 340 was about 2300 miles northwest of Spain when it turned around, Aviation Herald reported. One talkback noted that although the return trip must have frustrated passengers, expensive ground time at JFK probably was the reason for returning to Israel.

El Al also may have considered it more practical and efficient to repair the engine in Israel and reload the passengers on another airplane.

Technical Problem Forces El Flight to NY to Return to Israel

Monday, June 1st, 2015

Passengers flying to New York at 1 a.m. Monday enjoyed a short flight before finding themselves back at Ben Gurion Airport after a technical problem was discovered.

El Al technicians had fixed the problem, or at least thought they had fixed it, before the plane took off after a four-hour delay at 5 a.m.

After approximately one-third of their way to New York, the pilot and crew turned back to Ben Gurion after discovering that the problem occurred again.

Passengers took off for a second time around 11 a.m. on a different plane.

News for Israel: Boeing Sells Data, Drawings to Iran

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

For the first time since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Boeing Aerospace and Defense has made a sale to Iran.

The Chicago-based firm announced sales of some $120,000 to Iran that included aircraft manuals, drawings, navigation charts and data.

The items were sold to Iran Air, allegedly to “help improve the safety of Iran’s civil aviation industry,” according to Reuters.

The fact that any American aerospace and defense firm is being allowed to do business with Iran signals a sea change in the United States attitude that does not bode well for the Middle East.

According to the report, both Boeing and General Electric were given permission in April of this year by the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control to export parts for commercial aircraft to Iran, under a temporary sanctions relief deal.

Boeing did not indicate whether it had sold parts prior to the current sale, nor whether it planned to sell parts in the future, and declined further comment, the news agency said.

The firm made a net profit of approximately $12,000 in the third quarter on the sale to Iran. Boeing’s total sales for the quarter were reported at $23.7 billion.

Prior U.S. administrations worked tirelessly to persuade the international community to impose heavy sanctions on Iran to force Tehran to curtail its nuclear development activities.

There have been updated, repeated reports from Israeli intelligence warning that Iran is rapidly approaching the nuclear threshold, where a small step will take Tehran into the world of weapons of mass destruction. Alongside those warnings, the Iranian regime itself has stated firmly that it has no intention of slowing down – let alone stopping – its nuclear development program.

And in past years Iranian leaders have made it equally clear they have placed Israel squarely in the cross-hairs for future annihilation.

So what conclusions should Israel’s government draw from Boeing’s latest announcement?

Arrow 3 and US-Israel Defense Cooperation

Monday, March 4th, 2013

The cheering and the hugs exchanged by Israeli and American teams last week at Palmahim Air Force base, south of Tel Aviv, marked a historical turn of events.

For the first time ever, a successful test launch had been carried out of the Arrow 3 missile defense system, designed to stop Iranian long-range ballistic missiles – even those carrying nuclear warheads – in space.

The product of Israeli-American cooperation, and years of research and development led by the Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), together with the U.S. Department of Defense’s Missile Defense Agency, the successful test represented a leap forward in missile defense technology, and a key development in the ongoing Israeli-Iranian arms race.

Travelling at twice the speed of a tank shell, the Arrow 3 interceptor is carried into space by a missile, which then falls away. The interceptor is actually a space vehicle that carries out several swift maneuvers as it locks on to its target. It then lunges directly at the incoming projectile, for a head-on collision.

At speeds of up to 4000 meters (13,123 feet) per second, the interceptor relies only on its self-generated kinetic energy to destroy the hostile missile, and does not require its own explosives to get the job done.

The successful trial underscores the fact that despite significant political differences that exist between Jerusalem and Washington, defense cooperation between the two countries is today at an unprecedented level.

The first batch of four Arrow 3 batteries is expected to come into service between 2014 and 2016. Four additional upgraded batteries, carrying more interceptors, could be built later.

Israeli and American companies are working together to get the Arrow 3 operational. The technological breakthroughs that allowed for the Arrow 3 to be tested have been led by IAI, but collaboration with Boeing has been significant.

Iran is amassing hundreds of missiles capable of striking Israel, while taking steps forward in its nuclear program. As the Institute for National Security Studies in Tel Aviv has recently noted, Iran has Shihab 3 missiles that put all of Israel in range, as well as the Ghadr-1, which is an upgraded version of the Shihab 3.

Tehran is also developing the Sajjil-2, a two-stage solid fuel missile that can strike targets 2,000 kilometers away. Any of these missiles can be fitted to carry unconventional warheads.

To cope with this ballistic missile challenge, as well as the threat posed by Syrian scuds, some of which have reached Hezbollah, Israel has the Arrow 2 missile defense system in place, which shoots down incoming projectiles in the upper atmosphere.

Once it becomes operational, the Arrow 3 will form another layer of defense over millions of Israelis, thereby giving the Israel Air Force two to three shots at intercepting incoming missile.

“We are in arms race. We hope to be one step ahead, technologically,” said defense source well acquainted with the Arrow 3 program.

As part of the race to protect its civilians, Israel has set up the Iron Dome rocket protection system, which intercepted over 90 percent of rockets from Gaza during last year’s conflict with Hamas .

Other projects under development include the David’s Sling system, designed to stop intermediate rockets and missiles, which are a part of Hezbollah’s arsenal of more than 60,000 rockets.

Despite the progress being made in this field, Israel can never rely solely on defense for its national security. In an unstable region filled with radical non-state actors, collapsing states, and an Iran marching towards nuclear weapons capabilities, defense can only form one part of the plan to keep Israel safe.

The other part involves devastating offensive capabilities, designed to surprise adversaries and throw them off balance, bringing any conflict to a swift conclusion.

Originally published at the Gatestone Institute, under the title, “U.S. Helping Israel’s Defense.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/opinions/arrow-3-and-us-israel-defense-cooperation/2013/03/04/

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