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January 18, 2017 / 20 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘center’

Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education Buys Permanent Facilities

Sunday, July 10th, 2016

Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education Executive Director Judy Margles and Board Chair Elaine Coughlin last week announced the signing of a purchase agreement for the facilities at 724 NW Davis in Portland—formerly the home of the Museum of Contemporary Craft. Margles wrote the following announcement:

As our closest circle of friends, I am excited to share something very special with you. OJMCHE is purchasing a new home, a 14,500 square foot unit in the De Soto building at 724 NW Davis Street (formerly the Museum of Contemporary Craft). I am also thrilled to tell you that we achieved the purchase of the building with the hard work of the OJMCHE Board and in particular outgoing chair, David Newman. This is the moment where we have finally fulfilled our vision and secured our mission for generations to come.

How did we get to this momentous possibility? July will already mark the two-year anniversary of the merger with Oregon Holocaust Resource Center. The merger enriched our institution in countless ways – we expanded our education staff to include a Holocaust educator, we are proud stewards of the Oregon Holocaust Memorial, we bring thousands of school children to both the Memorial and museum, and, of course, we continue to be the community repository for the Jewish experience in Oregon. Most importantly, we have deepened our focus on Jewish values and traditions, while working even more strenuously to bring our work to the wider community as a vehicle that can unite all people in their common humanity. In short, the merger has greatly expanded and fundamentally strengthened our core mission.

And now we have the opportunity to take the next step in our evolution. In a stroke of great luck, the fortuitous arrival on the market of this building became the perfect space for our museum. While this was an unexpected opportunity, we were ready to receive it because of the long-range feasibility planning that we undertook this last year. This space—purpose-built as a contemporary museum with ample room for exhibits, programs, school groups, collections and archives—perfectly matches the needs detailed in our feasibility report.

I am also thrilled to tell you that we achieved the purchase of the building with the tremendous support of three lead gifts from Renee and Irwin Holzman, Lois and Leonard Schnitzer Family and The Harold & Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation/Arlene Schnitzer & Jordan Schnitzer. To date we have received a total of 33 gifts to make this phase of the campaign possible. For this generosity and sign of confidence, we are immensely grateful. Our community campaign, to raise funds for operating reserves and move-in costs, will commence shortly and I look forward to engaging each and every one of you in our endeavors.

Now that our dreams are becoming reality, we shall start to focus on the use of the space. I can share with you our basic conception: we will have state-of-the art storage for our archives and collection; a café; a gift shop; a multi-purpose auditorium for public programs and school groups; two floors of exhibit galleries with temporary exhibits on the first floor; and on the second space for core exhibits about the Oregon Jewish experience, discrimination in Oregon and the history of the Holocaust using stories of local survivors.

The coming months may prove to be the most significant in our history. An exciting consensus is emerging among museum professionals. We see successful museums of the future as places where people can hang out and engage in real and diverse social issues to make a genuine difference in their lives: these museums of the future will blur boundaries between the inside of the museum walls and what occurs outside, where programs will address a rich variety of living community concerns, while always recognizing, remembering and honoring the past. These museums will link historical experiences of the past with needs of the living present.

I want our museum to be such a museum: a broker and filter of perspectives and shared wisdom, a repository for traditional learning and historical scholarship, and also a stimulus for creative thinking on the way forward for our community. I want us to represent the full plurality of voices in our community and I want our programs to address a full range of community concerns.

We, this circle of friends, now share a magically rare opportunity: to help each other make our beloved Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education thrive, in all these many and varied ways, for many, many years to come.

Warmly,

Judy Margles

Executive Director

JNi.Media

Israel’s Response to Sarona Center Terror in Tel Aviv – Re-Secure the Checkpoints

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Thanks to two Arab terrorists, the cost of Israeli self-defense has again come at a high price for Islamic worshipers and families who were looking forward to visiting each other in the next few weeks. But terrorists rarely take the concerns of “civilians” into account when waging “jihad” against Jews and Israelis.

The initial Israeli response to Wednesday night’s terror attack on the upscale Sarona Center in Tel Aviv by two Palestinian Authority gunmen from Yatta has been swift — and it may be followed by further actions.

The decisions were also clearly measured, following a red-eye security cabinet meeting convened barely an hour after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s arrival from Russia. It lasted well into the wee hours of Thursday morning.

For a start, the freedom of movement between Palestinian Authority territories and Israel, a goodwill gesture to PA citizens for the Islamic holy month of Ramadan and broadened to a degree not seen since before 2007, was immediately curtailed.

Israel had opened all of the crossings for extended hours on the borders with all Palestinian Authority-controlled areas of Judea and Samaria, as well as Gaza, as a goodwill gesture for the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

Under the policy Palestinian Authority citizens in Judea, Samaria and Gaza were able to visit each other and to enter Israel for visits with relatives. They were also to be allowed unrestricted access to the Old City in Jerusalem on Friday to worship at the Al Aqsa mosque on the Temple Mount, and to be able to travel overseas via Ben Gurion International Airport.

IDF Maj.-Gen. Yoav Mordechai, Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT) said at the time that the move was Israel’s “civil policy to improve the quality of life for Arabs citizens of the Palestinian Authority in Judea, Samaria and Gaza, including the maintenance of their freedom of religion.”

But shortly after security heads met with Netanyahu, Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman, IDF Chief of State Gadi Eizenkot, Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan and the rest of the security cabinet, Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT) Gen. Yoav Mordechai announced the freezing of 83,000 entry permits issued to Judea and Samaria Arabs to visit their families on the “pre-1967” side of the crossings in Israel.

The permits were distributed as part of the goodwill policy for Ramadan.

In addition, all the permits for Gazans to pray on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem have now been frozen as well.

Moreover, 204 visitation permits issued to the families of terrorists in Israeli prisons were revoked.

The logic behind the move: The two terrorists who carried out Wednesday night’s murderous rampage were 21-year-old cousins, both from the Hebron suburb of Yatta, which has been sealed off for the time being. The sprawling village is a Hamas terrorist stronghold in the Palestinian Authority. Over the years it has grown to the size of a full-grown city in the southern Hebron Hills, just south of Kiryat Arba, near the Yatir checkpoint and a bit northwest of Arad.

Hana Levi Julian

Argentina to Investigate Official for Incitement against Israel

Saturday, August 24th, 2013

An Argentinian prosecutor a government official of incitement against Israel and public intimidation.

Alberto Nisman, the special prosecutor investigating the 1994 bombing of the AMIA cultural center, said there is “concrete evidence to start an investigation” of acting Under Secretary of Family Agriculture Emilio Persico, who participated in an Aug. 2 ceremony marking Al Quds Day at the At-Tawhid Mosque in Buenos Aires.

On Aug. 14, the Simon Wiesenthal Center wrote to Argentina’s minister of agriculture, Norberto Yauhar, calling for Persico’s removal. “Apparently, the speakers at Al Quds Day in Buenos Aires feel energized and empowered by the Argentina-Iran agreement, and now foment hate with impunity,” Sergio Widder, the Wiesenthal Center’s director for Latin America, told JTA, referring to a much-criticized agreement between the countries to jointly investigate the AMIA bombing.

The next day, Persico went to the headquarters of DAIA, the Jewish political umbrella group, to explain his position. DAIA president Julio Schlosser then told media: “We understood his reasons and the situation is finished.”

JTA

Things Haredim Do

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

A volunteer at the Tachlit center are busy dividing hordes of food into boxes, to be distributed to needy families before Shabbat and before the coming Jewish new year in Jerusalem.

Tomchei Shabbat (supporters of Shabbat) organizations like Tachlit flourish throughout the Haredi communities, each with its unique, local flavor, but all of them with one, central goal: feed the needy.

Most of them also deliver the food boxes quietly, so as not to shame the recipient. In many places there’s also a feedback system in place, allowing recipients to indicate which goods they like and which they’d rather not receive. It prevents waste, and also makes the proces look more like shopping than like charity.

Photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Yori Yanover

Video: Camp Jihad

Monday, August 5th, 2013

This film was shot on location in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) facilities in Judea, Samaria and Gaza, by a TV crew hired by the Nahum Bedein Center for Near East Policy Research.


David Bedein

Publicize that Miracle!

Sunday, December 9th, 2012

The first night of Chanukah, in the neighborhood of Nachlaot in the center of Jerusalem, December 8, 2012.

The idea of the Chanukah candles is to announce the miracle, make it as public as possible, kind of the visual equivalent of screaming it from the rooftops: We were stuck with only one little jug of oil and it lasted 1-2-3-4-5-6-7- and 8 days!

In Jerusalem they take these things very seriously, as you can see, literally publicizing the miracle in the streets.

Yori Yanover

First-Time Israeli Voters Going Right

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

This item in Hebrew from Israel’s Channel 2/Mako informs us that:

49% of all first time voters define themselves as right-wing.
20% as center but right-leaning.
5% as left and 9% as center but left-leaning.
How are those stats?
Visit My Right Word.
Yisrael Medad

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/my-right-word/first-time-israeli-voters-going-right/2012/12/03/

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