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October 25, 2014 / 1 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Rosh Hashanah’

Pollard’s Op-Ed and Graduating to the Next Level in the New Year

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Malkah joins Yishai to talk about how to explore breaking bad agreements with ourselves personally and as a nation. They move on to talk about Jonathan Pollard’s recently released op-ed, and end with how to graduate to the next level in the upcoming New Year.

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

Manischewitz Debuts Kosher Recipe App

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The Manischewitz Company, leader and innovator in Kosher foods, announces the beta version debut of their free Kosher Recipe App now available for download on all Apple and Android devices. The Manischewitz Recipe & Holiday Guide app makes its debut just in time for the fall Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Notable chefs, cookbook authors, and everyday home cooks submitted hundreds of recipes for the app which spans many occasions including Passover, Chanukah, Thanksgiving, Shabbat, Shavuot and more. Other categories of recipes include gluten-free, everyday meals, lunches, side dishes, and desserts.

The contributor’s shared many recipes, some of which have been in their family for generations. In addition to the recipes supplied by home cooks and well-known chefs, all recipes from finalists and winners from all past Man-O-Manischewitz Cook-Off Contests have been included as well. Jamie Geller, cookbook author and found of The Joy of Kosher magazine and website, contributed numerous recipes across all categories.

Key App Features Include:

All Kosher recipes that use Manischewitz ingredients Recipes for Holiday and everyday including Chanukah, Thanksgiving, Passover, Shabbat, Shavuot, 4th of July, Purim, and more Holiday fun facts Shabbat times for each week Recipe sharing on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest

Besides being kosher and easy to prepare, all the recipes feature some of the most popular Manischewitz products including all natural broths, noodles, matzo, matzo meal, honey, and many more. It is very easy to find recipes by typing in keywords or searching through the categories. The app will be an easy way for families to find new favorite recipes that can be shared and enjoyed at holiday and everyday meals.

The Manischewitz Recipe & Holiday Guide can now be downloaded for free to any Apple or Android device by searching for “Manischewitz” in the App Store for Apple devices, and the Google Play Store for Android devices, or by visiting the respective stores at the links below:

(Apple)

(Android)

New Super-Size Kitchen for Jews in Uman for Rosh HaShanah

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

Jewish volunteers have finished building a kitchen the size of a basketball court in Uman, Ukraine, where they plan to prepare 105,000 meals to serve an expected 20,000 Jews visiting and praying at the burial site of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov.

The new kitchen, donated by philanthropist and entrepreneur Steve Bogomilsky of Florida, replaced a smaller setup used in previous years by volunteers and employees of Uman’s Hachnasat Orchim project: A giant dining hall with 15,000 seats will be available for Jews to eat before and during Rosh HaShanah.

Meshulom (Charles) Rubinfeld, who is heading the project in Uman, said the kitchen’s 37 ovens and 17 burners will be used to cook 18 tons of meat, 13 tons of chicken and 105,000 pieces of fish, along with 250,000 challah rolls.

The cattle and poultry were slaughtered in Ukraine by butchers from the Badatz, Israeli’s most stringent kosher authority, who flew in from Israel. Other ingredients, all Badatz supervised, were shipped in from Israel in four containers.

Rubinfeld  said the food will be served in seven meals, 15,000 plates per meal, before and during Rosh Hashanah, which begins Sept. 4.

All leftover food will go to Jewish and non-Jewish charities in Ukraine, said Rubinfeld, who is holding weekly meetings with local officials to increase cooperation and minimize friction between Uman residents and the Jewish pilgrims.

Netanyahu Opens ‘Direct Talks’ with Abbas: Greetings on Ramadan

Monday, July 15th, 2013

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu picked up the phone on Sunday to personally call Palestinian Authority chairman Mahmoud Abbas and say, “I called to greet you on the occasion of Ramadan.”

That was the first time the Prime Minister has called Abbas since the new government took office this year.

Cynics might say that Netanyahu simply was being a political opportunist, calling days before U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry pays his sixth visit to the region this to re-invent the “peace process.”

“I hope that we will have an opportunity to speak to each other and not just on holidays, and that we begin negotiations,” the Prime Minister added. “This is important. I hope that American Secretary of State John Kerry’s efforts have results.”

That certainly should satisfy the cynics.

Unfortunately, the Office of the Prime Minister, which made sure the media knew about the phone call, did not mention what Abbas said in response, if anything. Government spokesman Mark Regev told the Jewish Press, “I cannot go beyond the statement.”

Presumably, Abbas said, “Thank you.”

That would be a good start.

The United States has been acting as middle man for Israel and the Palestinian Authority for more than 20 years, orchestrating the moves of the leaders, whether they be Arafat, Abbas, Netanyahu, Loment or Sharon.

Until now.

The Obama administration, which simply is carrying the flameless torch of the Bush administration, has put each side into a tight comer with no room to wriggle except to turn around and quit the game of charades.

If the international community, whatever that means today, would let Israel and the Palestinian Authority figure this out for themselves, maybe the locals actually know what is best.

Netanyahu got the ball rolling.

Who knows? Maybe Abbas will call him today and wish a “good fast” for Tisha B’Av?

Tisha B’Av marks the date that the First and Second Holy Temples were destroyed.

A cynic would say, “Wait a minute. The Palestinian Authority is trying to convince the world that the Jews never had any connection with the Temple Mount and that the Bible is simply Zionist propaganda.”

In that case, Abbas would not make any reference to  Tisha B’Av.

Oh well, there always is Rosh HaShanah.

 

Evesham School Board Member Quits over ‘J Word’ Scandal

Friday, June 14th, 2013

Rosemary Bernardi, a school board member from Evesham resigned Thursday, saying the uproar over what many perceived as her antisemitic comments had become a distraction for the school district, the Courier-Post reports.

“This local issue has become a distraction for the board to fulfill its mission, which is to provide our students with an educational foundation, in a safe, caring, supportive environment through a cooperative partnership with parents and community,” Bernardi wrote in her letter of resignation.

She also stepped down from her position of vice president with the New Jersey School Boards Association.

Evesham School Board President, aptly named Sandy Student, told the Courier-Post Bernardi resignation came under strong public pressure, which made her lose her ability to do her job properly.

“I’m very happy she made the right decision for the community,” said Student.

Jewish Press reader Carrie Lieberstein who lives in the area objected to The Jewish Press original report on the Bernardi affair, which started with a school board discussion of moving the first day of the next school year from Friday, Sept. 6, to Monday, Sept. 9, because the 6th coincides with the second day of the two-day Jewish holiday, Rosh Hashanah. Bernardi allegedly said that, since the board was comprised of 5 Jews and only 3 non-Jews, the vote was going to come out along ethnic lines – which it did.

In a talkback, Lieberstein wrote: “She humiliated Jewish school board members by addressing an election topic. She stated. ‘There are five Jewish seats and three open seats.’ Why did she have to draw attention to their religious/ethnic Jewish identities?”

Lieberstein, who said he had been instrumental in bringing the Anti Defamation League to the case, added: “Ms. Bernardi resigned today and the ADL informed me of this.”

Evesham resident Sue Wilder has been asking for Bernardi’s resignation since last month. She also filed an ethics complaint against Bernardi, according to the Courier-Post.

Others, like Evesham resident David Thompson, said that Bernardi’s comments were taken out of context.

“Something reprehensible happened that night,” he said of the May 23 meeting. “The reprehensible action was that five board members voted to change the schedule, after voting for it twice before.”

In a separate talkback, after accusing The Jewish Press of taking lightly that which is a very meaningful concern for the Jewish residents of Evesham, Liberstein advises: “By the way, it’s always okay to admit that perhaps you made a mistake. Humility is a good thing.”

I must say, living in a Jewish state, surrounded by nothing but Jews most of the time, it is possible that I’ve forgotten the more brittle quality of Jewish life in diasporah, and so I certainly apologize for that, especially if my callousness hurt a reader’s feelings.

I also have to say, it’s fun living in a Jewish state, surrounded by nothing but Jews most of the time.

Hint of Antisemitism, Hyper PC, in NJ School Board Vote

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Rosemary Bernardi, a 7-year member of the Evesham, NJ, school board, has issued an apology for remarks she made at the May 23 board meeting that were called insensitive and discriminatory, according to the website South Jersey Local News.

Bernardi emailed the following statement on May 27 to her fellow board members:

“Let me begin by expressing my heartfelt apology to the people of Evesham Township for my remarks at the school board meeting. Categorizing individuals on the basis of their religion, race, gender, or sexual orientation has no place in our society, and most especially in our public discourse.”

It all started, apparently, with a board discussion of moving the first day of the next school year from Friday, Sept. 6, to Monday, Sept. 9, because the 6th coincides with the second day of the two-day Jewish holiday, Rosh Hashanah.

First of all, like most of you, I’m sure, I have to say I didn’t realize Rosh Hashanah is coming so early this year. Second, it doesn’t look to me like such a big deal, starting school on Monday instead of on Friday. In fact, who starts anything on a Friday? Let the folks—Jews and non-Jews—stay on the shore until Sunday night, like human beings, and then make them drive home in bumper-to-bumper traffic the way God intended.

At the meeting, Bernardi objected to changing the school calendar, because she thought it would affect all the students just in order to accommodate a few students.

But the way Bernardi said it is what got the good people of Evesham all riled up. She has been accused of having singled out those few students by calling them “Jews.”

That’s right. She had the audacity to call students who attend Rosh Hashanah services by the J word.

As a person who has been addressed by that word so many times, I know how it must feel when a public official actually uses it to define an entire group of students. Shocking.

But that was not all. In a May 25 Philadelphia Inquirer article, Bernardi stated that she did mention at the meeting that there were five Jewish members on the board, which is why her attempt to keep school open on Rosh Hashanah “won’t happen on this board because there’s five members of the Jewish faith on this board. They have a majority.”

Incidentally, the school board vote on pushing the calendar to Monday resulted in two gentiles voting against, one gentile abstaining, and five Jews voting for the move.

At First There Was Chaos

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Chaos – that is how the world is described at its inception in the book of Beraishis (Genesis). Confusion. A lack of clarity and boundaries. Or, as I teach my kindergartners, “a mishmash”.

That has been my life recently, as I have grappled with the myriad of details that accompany moving from one home to another. There is an expression, “Go into chinuch (Jewish education) and see the world.” Our family has not had to crisscross the map too many times (we’ve lived in three out-of-town communities), yet somehow we’ve lived in nearly ten different homes in three decades. And for me, well, this has posed a great challenge. The first is remembering our phone number. I remember standing in a store and being asked what my telephone number was. Meanwhile I was trying desperately to remember what my new area code was. Once, when I was faced with a third move in five years, I felt it was too much to have to meet new people once more. One wonderful woman reminded me that as a result of the moves, I had been given the opportunity to meet a great variety of people, and deepen my ahavas Yisrael (love of fellow Jews).

The challenge of moving is to do it without losing all of one’s possessions, and one’s mind. Not long ago, I brought over a plate of cake to welcome a new family to our community. Though it had been but a few days, I will never forget how the house looked. All the curtains were hung and the kitchen totally organized. There was not a box in sight. Floating flowers were in a giant vase on the dining room table. I stepped out, bewildered at the site, knowing that this newly-moved into home was much more orderly then my own.

One of my daughters used to complain when she was young about her lack of talent. She believed that each sibling had something special, whether being artistic, athletic, musical, or even adorable. “But you’re so organized!” I said. She sighed. “That is not a talent”. “Honey,” I answered, “when you get older you’ll realize that it is the best talent of all!” And now she does, as she is able to keep her family and possessions organized while living in a small Israeli apartment. She works outside of her home, but never loses papers or searches for socks, because of her ability to stay organized.

My husband and I asked daas Torah (Torah advice from a scholar) about which neighborhood in our current city we should move to. Should we live where most of the shomer Shabbos people (Sabbath observers) lived, next to one shul or to the neighborhood with only a handful of families, next to the other shul?

There was not a kosher mechitza in the shul with the larger group of people, we told the rav, but my husband intends to daven in the other shul no matter where we live. “No,” the rav told us, “You cannot live near a shul without a kosher mechitza.”

So we moved far away from the shomer Shabbos population, until the day the mechitza was finally made kosher. Our kids were thrilled. Now they could live within the main community, and no longer have to walk a ½ hour each week to see their friends. Those Shabbos afternoons had been hard on us too, as we wouldn’t see the kids until we picked them up after Shabbos.

My husband agreed that we should move closer to the other neighborhood, but still felt obligated to help the minyan in the smaller shul. So, we moved closer, but not to the heart of the community; we stayed on the outskirts, but our kids were able to walk to their friends.

Unfortunately, it was time to move once again. This time we were desperate to find a suitable house, and grabbed the first one we saw. We were relieved there was the right amount of bedrooms and lots of storage space. However, once more we were a long distance away from any shomer Shabbos families. Once more our children would leave the house Shabbos afternoon and not to return till after Havdalah.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/at-first-there-was-chaos/2012/12/06/

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