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September 20, 2014 / 25 Elul, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘City Hall’

A Hose By Any Other Name

Friday, August 24th, 2012

Residents of Du-Pia Street in Rehovot, Israel, recently petitioned their City Hall to change the name of their street, which they believe is not respectable.

The unusual name commemorates an old term, indigenous to Rehovot, describing a local… garden hose.

Du-Pia means a two-mouthed hose, which, way back when, was considered a technological achievement significant enough to justify naming a street after it.

Don’t belittle the magnitude of this time saving invention. Using a hose that points in two opposite directions at once saves half the time when watering one’s lawn. In a country where it is crucial to water the lawn while the air is still cool enough, so the water won’t evaporate as soon as it leaves the hose, this is a big deal.

“I think the name is derogatory, we deserve a street named in honor of a great Zionist leader, or a fallen hero,” Du-Pia Street resident Israel Sela told MyNet.

Another resident added: “I think it’s a badge of shame to the municipality. Never mind that we were not included in picking the name, but now, after so many complaints, we’re yet to receive a satisfactory answer.”

The City of Rehovot’s response was: “Indeed, there was a request to change the name of the street, the subject has been discussed several times, but the motion to change the name was voted down every time.”

Some elected officials consider the name to have historic value, which is why they refuse to let it be changed.

You see, there is a local dispute among several towns and villages, including Givat Brenner, Kvutzat Schiller, and Akron, over who deserves the credit for the invention of the name.

“Differences of opinion around the street name have not been resolved to this day,” concludes the note from the Rehovot municipality, which is, incidentally, home of the Weizmann Institute of Science, where many useful inventions are added every day.

The Importance Of Voting

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

While it is always important for our community to vote in large numbers, recent redistricting has made it all the more imperative.

Most disturbing is a change in Brooklyn that raises the possibility that City Councilman Charles Barron – who has openly declared he has problems with white people and who over the years has made statements that have led even staunch Democrats to accuse him of anti-Semitism – stands a very real chance of defeating State Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries in the June 26 Democratic primary in the 8th Congressional district. The victor will succeed Congressman Edolphus Towns.

A press conference held the other day in support of Mr. Jeffries by a group of elected officials and community leaders in front of New York City’s City Hall underscored this very real concern.

The Barron-Jeffries race may be the most extreme example, but it underscores the point that we all must come out to vote, no matter where we reside.

Israeli Startup Wins NYC Big Apps 3.0 Award

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

YooGuide, an Israeli startup, has won “The Investors Choice Application” award at the NYC Big Apps 3.0 competition for its app, The Funday Genie.

Funday Genie received top marks out of 96 applicants and received an award from New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Funday Genie is a day planner which recommends restaurants, shows, events and exhibits taking place that day, allowing the user to find appropriate entertainment based on various categories and factors.  It also gives instructions about reaching destinations, and takes into account the day’s weather report.

The event, hosted by City Hall, aimed to “foster new technology that improves the quality of life of New York’s residents and visitors.”

Are You Allowed to Cry ‘Heil Hitler’ in a Crowded City Hall?

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Aida Ahmad and Kate Linthicum of the Los Angeles Times report that “tempers flared” at the Los Angeles City Hall on Tuesday when a councilman said he was tempted to “clock” a speaker who called out “Heil Hitler” during a public comment period.

It started when Michael Carreon, a resident of Los Angeles’ 14th council district, objected to the rules of decorum at a City Council meeting on Tuesday.

Carreon directed his comments to a few council members who, apparently, weren’t paying attention to him, and so Councilman Tom LaBonge, who was chairing the meeting, stopped him. LaBonge instructed Carreon not to address his comments to specific members, as per city rules.

Carreon, a regular at these meetings, was livid.

“The city’s going to hell in a handbasket, and you’re going to sit up there and dictate?” he said. “I’m upset, so I guess I’ll just salute you.” He raised one hand in the air in a Nazi salute, and shouted: “Heil Hitler.”

That’s when Councilman Paul Koretz, who is Jewish, stood up from his seat and said: “That’s a highly offensive thing, I’m very tempted to go over there and clock ‘im.”

You’d expect the offending Heil shouter would be carried out by security guards at that point, but a City attorney who was present at the meeting said his comments weren’t grounds for eviction.

At another point Tuesday, Matt Dowd, another frequent City Hall critic, used the F word when addressing the assembly. Soon after, the meeting was adjourned.

Conclusion: You can cry ‘Heil Hitler’ in a crowded LA City Hall, but say one F word and everybody runs home.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/are-you-allowed-to-cry-heil-hitler-in-a-crowded-city-hall/2012/04/11/

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