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October 22, 2014 / 28 Tishri, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Honenu’

Court: Ban on Temple Mount Jewish Prayer Violates Freedom of Worship

Monday, June 24th, 2013

In its deliberation Sunday, June 23, at the Jerusalem Magistrate Court, Judge Dov Pollock ordered that a Jewish youth suspected of praying at the gate to the Temple Mount and assaulting an Arab youth be released to his home on condition of his posting bail and with a restraining order banning him from the Temple Mount area for 15 days.

The judge rejected police demand for a restraining order banning the youth from the entire Old City for 60 days.

In his decision, Judge Pollock noted that police claim that Jewish prayer on the Temple Mount is problematic and causes unrest violates freedom of religion. Judge Pollock cited in his decision a similar statements written by Judge Malka Aviv several months ago.

On Friday, June 21, the youth arrived at the Cotton Merchants’ Gate leading to the Temple Mount in order to say a prayer in a place from which the site of the Holy Temple could be seen. According to the youth, he prayed at the gate and while he was praying an Arab youth approached him and began to kick him. According to the youth and Itamar Ben-Gvir, the attorney representing him on behalf of Honenu, such occurrences are commonplace on the Temple Mount and in the surrounding area. Arab youths, and sometimes children, are sent by adults to provoke and beat Jews going up to the Temple Mount. The police and the court do not deny it. The Jewish youth said that he kicked the Arab youth in return and in response was detained by policemen who were on the scene.

Despite the fact that Shabbat would soon begin, the Old City Police did not hurry to bring the youth to court for a hearing and as a result he was forced to spend Shabbat in remand.

On Saturday night, the detainee was brought to the Jerusalem Magistrate Court for a hearing on his release conditions. Judge Hagit Mak-Kalmanovitch berated the police representatives for holding a hearing on release conditions at such a late hour and released the detainee under an obligation to report the following morning for the hearing.

The following morning, the court rejected the police demand for a 60 day restraining order banning the youth from the entire Old City of Jerusalem. Judge Pollock also added that when Arab women made a disturbance on the Temple Mount, the police did not demand a 60 day restraining order and therefore he does not see cause for such a demand in the case currently before him.

In response to the court’s decision, attorney Itamar Ben-Gvir, representing the youth on behalf of Honenu, said that “This is an important decision which I hope the Israeli Police will study and internalize. The right to pray in the State of Israel is not reserved only to the Women of the Wall, but also to Jews who would like to see the Holy Temple rebuilt.”

“The judge’s decision today asserts that there is no prohibition against praying on the Temple Mount,” said Ben-Gvir, “and that it is the police who are acting against the law when they prevent Jews from praying.”

For additional, but not all, cases in which Honenu attorneys represented Jews detained on or near the Temple Mount please go here, here, here and here.

Outpost Fathers Arrested in Middle of the Night and then Freed

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Border police swooped down on the Eish Kodesh outpost late Monday night and arrested five men who were released only hours later concerning an incident several weeks ago in which a Palestinian Authority Arab infiltrator was wounded.

The Honenu legal defense organization called the arrest a “political provocation by the police,” who lawyers said knew ahead of time the outcome of the investigation that lasted several hours at the Maaleh Adumim police station.

“There is no reason in the world to arrest adults in front of their little children in the middle of the night,” said a Honenu lawyer.

Police searched their homes and confiscated their weapons during the raid, which was connected with a recent infiltration at Eish Kodesh by neighboring Arab villagers, one of whom said he was hit by a bullet from an M-16 rifle.

All five men who were arrested were members of the first response team, and one of them is an IDF solider.

The Arab infiltrators had reached a vineyard on the hilltop when IDF reinforcements arrived with riot gear but apparently without rifles. At the soldiers’ request, one of the Eish Kodesh team fired twice in the air, according to army orders. Border Police then arrived at the scene and took command, and one of them apparently injuring an Arab while distancing the infiltrators from the community.

Early Morning Raid on Od Yosef Chai Yeshiva in Yitzhar

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

General Security Services forces raided the yeshiva Od Yosef Chai in the Samaria-region community of Yitzhar in the early hours of Wednesday morning, detaining one student for failing to appear in court. Students at the scene claim that after the young man was detained, agents continued searching throughout the dormitory, finally returning to the detainee and claiming they had not recognized him because one of the agents failed to bring his eyeglasses.

A representative of Honenu, which provides legal assistance to soldiers and civilians in legal situations due to defending themselves against Arab aggression, or due to their activism for Israel, said the police have performed dozens of raids on the yeshiva in the last few years because of the high concentration of activists studying there.

Israeli Police Illegal Arrest and Interrogation Fail to Pin Firebombing on 13- and 12-Year-Old Jewish Boys (Video)

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Those of us who live in democratic societies have grown to see the limits placed on our naturally exuberant police forces as essential components of our civil freedoms. We know a person may not be interrogated without his or her attorney being present. We know a person must be arraigned and charged with a crime, or be set free. We know a minor may not be interrogated without his or her parent present.

Not in the wild-west territory of Judea and Samaria, where police is more likely to be brutal than not, especially to Jewish “settlers” (Hebrew for Pariah) and definitely not regarding Jewish boys of bar mitzvah age and younger.

Every week, it seems, we are treated to new evidence of Israel’s security forces in the “territories” appearing to merge with the Arab regime police forces all around us, employing brute force, intimidation, illegal incarceration and the occasional physical torture, because, frankly, they’ve run out of other ways to solve crimes.

A case in point is the recent testimony of two young teens, one 12, the other 13, who testified on video which was published by HaKol HaYehudi (The Jewish Voice).

At the end of last week, three young teens from Bat Ayin were released after spending six days in prison on suspicion of firebombing an Arab taxi, injuring six Arabs.

All three children withstood extremely difficult conditions and especially long interrogations, accompanied with threats and sophisticated tactics, utilizing relentless psychological pressure.

13-year-old M. told HaKol HaYehudi about the investigation methods employed by the Police Central Unit (Yamar) and the General Security Service (Shabak).

M. and his friends were on their way to Jerusalem Sunday morning, last week.

“At the Gush intersection (a hitchhiking post), a car stopped to give us a ride to Jerusalem. Two of us got in; the third boy wanted to get in too, but the driver said that he would only agree to take two. The driver and his wife started talking to us about ‘Price Tag’ (the clandestine retaliation movement against the left-wing and Arabs) and whether it was a good thing or not,” M. related.

“The driver turned on the radio and it was someone talking about ‘Price Tags’  and that we have to burn down mosques during the day, with the Arabs still inside, and that he tried to join the Price Tag movement and they wouldn’t agree with him. It seemed very strange, but we didn’t understand what was going on,“ M. described.

“When the radio piece was over, the driver started asking us who threw the firebomb, and that of course we knew who it is.” M. answered that he and his friend had no idea who did it.

The two children still didn’t realize that the innocent “hitch” was a actually a police trap.

“We reached Kiryat Moshe and asked to get out, but the driver said that he would pull over for us at a stop further down the road. When we got to that stop, the driver said that it’s illegal to stop at the bus stop and there’s an increased fine for it, so he would stop after the next turn. He stopped after the turn and two detectives immediately jumped on us and told us that we were under arrest for suspicion of conspiracy to commit a crime.”

After several days under arrest, M. was led near the interrogation room when he suddenly heard loud shouts.

“I saw the driver of the car that we hitchhiked in, handcuffed inside the interrogation room, with a detective shouting at him, ‘what did you talk about with them during the ride?  We already know everything about you!’ and stuff like that. I heard him tell the detective that he knows me only because he picked me up one day at the Gush intersection and that he has no connection to us.”

“After that, I was put into a holding cell and suddenly they put him in too. He started shouting at me: ‘What did you do? I am a married man and I don’t want to get involved in problems.’”

The investigating police officer then started to shout at M. that he and his friends must tell the detectives what they did in order to get the man released to his family.

“I didn’t really pay attention to him, so they took him out and I didn’t see him again,” said M.

Remaining Bat Ayin Boys Released

Friday, August 31st, 2012

The remaining two Bat Ayin children, ages 12 and 13, accused of firebombing an Arab taxi were released from police custody on Friday morning without charges. They will remain under house arrest for one additional week.

The third child, age 12, who was released without any additional conditions a few days ago reported that the police treated them very poorly. They were hardly given any food their first day in jail and the interrogations lasted for hours during which they were screamed and yelled at.

Honenu, the Israeli legal rights organization reports that police denied the minors their basic civil rights on a number of occasions, including being denied access to their lawyer and the presence of an additional adult during interrogation, as required by law when minors are involved.

Initially the police denied the children access to a lawyer, until the Honenu lawyer brought his request to court, and the police were forced to comply with the law.

 

 

So Far, One Bat Ayin Minor Released in Firebomb Investigation

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

So far, one of the Bat Ayin minors, ages 12-13, arrested in suspicion of throwing the firebomb on the Arab taxi has been released.

The Legal Rights organization Honenu reports that the police have not allowed the two other children, still being detained, to talk with lawyers.

They furthermore claim that the police are not following proper procedure in investigating the case including the investigation of their alibis. And to add to that, one of the victims has stated publicly that their attacker was an adult in his twenties, while a second victim made it very clear that it could not have been 12-13 year old children that threw the firebomb.

Jerusalem Protest Detainees Released

Thursday, June 7th, 2012

The four detainees from Wednesday’s protest in front of the Knesset in Jerusalem have been unconditionally released at the police station, Honenu reports.

Following a Knesset vote on the “Regulation Law” intended to prevent the evacuation of the Ulpana Neighborhood in Beit El, Ulpana residents and others supporting the law broke up in angry protest.

During the protest MK Michael Ben-Ari of the National Union party reported to Honenu that his parliamentary aide, right-wing activist Itamar Ben-Gvir, had been detained (not arrested, as previously reported) for objecting to the use of mounted police, whom he said endangered the lives of the protesters.

Two minors, one suspected of cursing a policeman and the other of pushing a policeman, were also detained. An additional adult was detained on suspicion of disturbing a policeman in the line of duty.

After several hours of interrogation at the Moriah Police Station, the four detainees were unconditionally released at the station.

Honenu attorney Adi Kedar handled the case.

MK Ben-Ari, whose faction’s proposed bill had just been defeated by a 3-1 margin, was offering carrots to all the “bunnies” among the coalition ministers, who promised their support to the bill but, under threat of dismissal from Netanyahu’s government, remained absent during the vote.

The bunny, or “shafan” in Hebrew, is the paradigm of cowardice in Israeli culture.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/jerusalem-protest-detainees-released/2012/06/07/

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