web analytics
September 30, 2016 / 27 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Ben Gurion Airport’

Airport Union’s Unique Strike Threat: Shabbat Observance

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

The Airports Authority Employees’ Union announced Thursday that they intend to observe Shabbat laws at Ben Gurion International Airport from dusk Friday until dark Saturday night. The strike was declared in protest of the Finance Ministry’s plan to take about half a million dollars in royalties from the airport authority. The union declared that the airports authority is not the cash cow of the state of Israel, and if the authority has been sitting on money the workers had been unaware of, it should use it to absorb the thousands of contract employees who are currently working without benefits.

A senior union member told Walla Thursday that the workers were enraged by the Finance Ministry’s decision to pull the funds, because “it’s clear to us that withdrawing the money will result in budget deficits at the authority, leading to mass layoffs.” He added that it looks like “the Finance Ministry wants to pay the costs of the government’s coalition agreements out of the Airport Authority’s money.”

According to the union, the Shabbat protocol will permit landings of already scheduled flights from abroad, but no takeoffs. But should the Finance Ministry not change its plan, further disruptions will follow.

This unusual, albeit partial observance of Shabbat laws comes at one of the busiest seasons at Ben Gurion International, with tens of thousands of Israelis leaving on their vacations every day. Last August saw the breaking of all time records, with more than two million passengers on international flights going through the airport.

JNi.Media

UPDATE: Swiss Air Force Escorts El Al Plane Following Bomb Threat

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

The Swiss Air Force scrambled fighter planes to escort an El Al flight from New York to Tel Aviv around their borders following a bomb threat against the flight.

The Swiss F-18 planes escorted the El Al flight along the French-Swiss border, according to Swiss media.

Israel radio said that German fighter planes were scrambled too.

It is unclear what the fighter planes would actually do if there was a bomb on board.

The flight is continuing on to Tel Aviv’s Ben-Gurion Airport without a problem. It’s expected to land between 12:32 PM to 12:40 PM Israel time. Update: The plane has landed safely at around 12:43 PM.

El Al released a statement that an anonymous threat was received, and the plane is continuing to Ben-Gurion airport as planned.

According to the Israeli Foreign Ministry after conferring with El Al, US airport authorities received an anonymous threat of a bomb in the kitchen of the El Al plane. The American authorities informed the Swiss authorities as the plane was then over their airspace. The Swiss then scrambled their fighters.

The El Al crew checked and did not find any bombs on board in the kitchen or elsewhere.

Update: The plane has landed safely at Ben-Gurion Airport at around 12:43 PM.

Jewish Press News Briefs

El AL Flight to Paris Nearly Departs Without Air Marshals

Monday, June 27th, 2016

An El Al flight to Paris from Tel Aviv was forced to return to the terminal after it began making its way to the runway, according to a Channel 2 report.

According to the report, the flight’s security guards never got onto the airplane. When the staff realized the undercover guards weren’t there, the plane returned to the terminal to pick them

The plane took off an hour late, which is nothing too serious compared to the other delays El Al flights have been suffering over the past week.

At least they didn’t forget the pilot.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Analysis: Trump Giving Israel a Bad Name with ‘Profiling’ Comment

Monday, June 20th, 2016

“I think profiling is something that we’re going to have to start thinking about as a country,” GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump told CBS’ Face the Nation on Sunday, using Israel as an example for a place where this method is flourishing and yielding results. “You look at Israel and you look at others, and they do it and they do it successfully. And you know, I hate the concept of profiling, but we have to start using common sense,” he said.

Sadly, as Israel is being drawn with increasing frequency into the US presidential elections, with the Democrats using the Israeli-Arab conflict as a battle field between the Sanders and Clinton proxies, bits of prejudice and misinformation about the life and politics of the Jewish State are coming to the fore and, more often than not, spreading more ignorance than knowledge about it.

Donald Trump’s cartoon depiction of Israel’s security forces’ strategies is a case in point. A few years ago, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio was elected on a promise to do away with police racial profiling, because it perpetuated decades of abuse when African-Americans and Latinos would be routinely stopped and frisked by police. But predictive profiling, which takes into account multiple elements in an individual’s manner and appearance, is a crucial component of law enforcement work, and it’s much more complex than just skin color and religion.

Not according to the BBC, which informed its listeners on Sunday: “Profiling uses ethnicity, race and religion to determine whether a person has or is likely to commit crimes.”

And, sadly, this is probably what Trump meant when he shared with Face the Nation what he had taken from Israel’s security strategies. In a sense, Trump’s and the BBC’s notions of profiling come down to the store detective who spots a black person coming in and sticks to them expecting that they are more likely than others to shoplift.

If Israel’s security forces had used this yardstick in their approach to predictive profiling it would have choked not just its international airports, but traffic on the streets in many cities, too. If all you need to be in order to trigger security response is dark-skinned or Muslim, three-quarters of Israelis would spend their days and nights in police stations.

Chris Weller, who last year reported in Business Insider about his experience as a foreign, non-Jewish traveler at Ben Gurion airport, noted that “no flight leaving Ben Gurion has ever been hijacked, and the airline servicing Israel, El Al, hasn’t seen an attack in more than 30 years.” And yet, dozens of El Al and other flights leave Ben Gurion every day, and passenger traffic is brisk and efficient.

Israel employs, on the streets of its cities as well as in its airports, an intelligence driven system that relies on good communication, alert operatives, and multi-layered screening. Daniel Wagner, co-author of the book “Global Risk Agility and Decision Making,” cites Raphael Ron, a former director of security at Ben Gurion for 5 years, who said the passenger-oriented security system there is focused on the “human factor,” and is “based on the assumption that terrorist attacks are carried out by people who can be found and have been stopped through the use of this simple but effective security methodology.”

Unlike all US airports, departing passengers in Ben Gurion are not asked to take off their shoes during physical screening processes. Instead, passengers are interviewed by trained agents before they get to the check-in counter. So that the area in front of the check-in is not conceded to potential terrorists, as was the case recently in the Brussels airport attack. The interviews last one or two minutes for the most part, so that the line of passengers is moving quickly, and when the agents (they work in pairs) do suspect someone, based on factors such as vocabulary, general behavior, dress, age, race, religion and destination—they may be detained and questioned for as long as it takes.

But the scrutiny at Ben Gurion begins well ahead of the passenger’s arrival at the terminal itself. Every vehicle first passes through a security checkpoint where armed agents examine it, have a brief exchange with the driver, and assess their risk level. Meanwhile, the vehicle is gauged by a weight sensor, and an undercarriage scan. Then, outside and inside the terminal building agents are always mingling with the crowd pouring in, aided by hidden surveillance cameras that are monitored around the clock. Suspicious people would be challenged without waiting for them to reach a counter or a metal detector. An agent would approach them and strike a conversation to assess their mental state and risk level.

All of that well coordinated system relies on a broader intelligence infrastructure that uses informants, social network scrutiny and surveillance — traditional police methods which Israel’s security forces have been using and improving over the past decade and a half both in green line Israel and in Judea, Samaria and Gaza.

Chris Weller offered an excellent example for the way Israel combines computer technology with the human factor, to create a smooth, reliable, fast and effective communication system regarding predictive profiling. “I learned that before any passenger ever gives up his luggage to the fine folks at Ben Gurion International, an employee places a neon yellow sticker on the back of your passport. On it is a 10-digit number. The first number, ranging from one to six, indicates your perceived threat level to whomever else you’re passed along. I got a five.”

And so, with a simple bar-coded sticker, the first agent who meets the passenger communicates his impressions to the next agent down the line without having to exchange one word or even a gesture. Leftwing writer Lia Tarachansky complained a few years ago about the same system:

“So I enter the line … My Israeli-Palestinian roommate tells me he’ll wait while I answer the security lady’s questions. She sees I speak Hebrew, she asks if I packed my own bags and she gives me a ‘1’ as expected. I’m white and I’m an Israeli, therefore I’m probably a Zionist. High from excitement and privilege I ask if my friend can come with me to the check-in. She says of course and asks for his ID. Her face changes.

“Where it says the Jewish birth date the line in his ID is blank. i.e. not Jewish. i.e. Palestinian.

– you know this man?

– yes

– how?

– he’s my roommate

– where?

– Jaffa

– wait here.

“She looks at his last name. It’s Christian, i.e. Arab. She disappears with our passports. The roommate looks at me and we both know what’s going to happen. When she comes back her smile is gone. She tears the ‘1’ off my bags and angrily puts on a ‘3’ as though to say ‘you didn’t tell me you have an Arab friend!’ Her face says ‘don’t you see you’re [expletive] it all up for us?!’”

Tarachansky described in her vivid style just how unhappy she was with the Israeli security system, but the fact is that even in her anti-Israeli narrative one can see that no one was hurt in the encounter she described, no one was manhandled, no one even missed their flight. But the system quickly spotted and responded to the potential threat, and the response was to replace a passport sticker. This hostile depiction of the Israeli method is, in fact, a song of praise to a rational, sophisticated and effective security system.

One wonders whether Donald Trump, or the media, understand the full depth of this system when he describes Israel’s success in police work and security as “profiling.”

JNi.Media

Flight from Dubai Lands in Israel

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

A Royal Jordanian Airbus A320 flight from Dubai to Amman, Jordan was forced to make an emergency landing, in Israel at Ben Gurion Airport.

The plane, RJA611, was diverted due to poor landing conditions in Jordan, and low fuel.

The plane landed safely at 3:15 PM.

Airport personnel gave the passengers Krembos (a cookie and cream treat).

Passengers on the flight from Dubai receive Krembos after landing in Israel.

Passengers on the flight from Dubai receive Krembos after landing in Israel.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Scandinavian Airline to End Tel Aviv-Copenhagen Route

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) has announced it will cancel its Tel Aviv-Copenhagen, citing both “political instability” and ‘’increasing costs and competition.”

The service, which is offered four times a week and which began three years ago, will end in March following a temporary suspension this summer because of staffing problems.

SAS also said it will eliminate Moscow and Ankara from its list of destinations.

Traffic on the Tel Aviv-Copenhagen route increased 41 percent last year and another 21 percent this year, through July, but the company maintained that the route still is losing money because of “stiff competition.”

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Hezbollah Were Surprised by How Easily their Spy Entered Israel

Friday, September 25th, 2015

(JNi.media) Hassan Hizran, a Swede of Lebanese origin, was arrested in Israel during the summer on suspicion of spying for Hezbollah. The story of his capture and interrogation, to be published this weekend by Walla! Magazine, reveal the enormous scope of the Shiite terror organization anti-Israel mission.

“I’ll tell you the whole story,” Hassan Hizran told his Israeli interrogators. Hezbollah’s assignments for Hizran included observations of the Dimona nuclear reactor, photos of classified IDF bases, and recruiting Israeli Arabs who had contacts with Israeli soldiers.

In 2011, Hizran visited Lebanon. “I remember the day I arrived in Lebanon a large car bomb exploded in Hezbollah’s stronghols, the Dahieh predominately Shia Muslim suburb south of Beirut. After four days, I saw a friend who told me that Hezbollah wanted to meet with me. I agreed.” Hizran’s eyes were bound and he was taken to a safe house where he was questioned. “In the room I was taken to there was a large map of Israel,” recalls Hizran. “A man walked in and introduced himself as Abbas Almosawi. He looked to be in his late 40s. Abbas said that he apologized that the meeting would be brief on account of the blown vehicle, which is why he was very busy. He asked me to tell him what happened to me ‘inside’ [the Green Line]. At first he wanted to hear details on the Tel Aviv airport, how do people coming to Israel from abroad get in, how are the security arrangements there. I told him I had been greeted me very well. I entered Israel without any difficulty.” “How can it be? ” the man from Hezbollah insisted.” That’s what happened, everything was easy and without problems. ”

The Hezbollah man was very interested in the fact that one of Hizran Israeli relatives makes his living as a photographer. “When I told him my family member was a photographer working events and weddings he said it was a very important detail, because he would know a lot of Jews, and he might even recruit more Israeli Arabs,” Hizran confessed. “He ordered me specifically—recruit your relative into Hezbollah Intelligence.” When Hizran said this could place his relative in danger, the Hezbollah insisted, “Recruit him.”

At some point, Hizran began to fear getting in serious trouble because of his ties with the Shiite terror organization. After a few days of evasions, Tariq, his friend inside Hezbollah, managed to get hold of him. “Your situation is not good,” Tariq told Hizran. “What do you mean?” Replied Hizran. “You owe the Hezbollah, and you should meet with them urgently or you will have problems.” Hizran asked Tariq: “Is this a threat?” and Tariq said in response: “They control the airport — you can figure out the rest. They can stop you from leaving and they know where you live in Sweden”.

Finally, Hizran decided to return to Israel under pressure from Hezbollah. Special police force Lahav 433 and the Shin Bet arrested him on July 22 at Ben Gurion Airport. He was taken for deep interrogation and confessed everything.

JNi.Media

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/hezbollah-were-surprised-by-how-easily-their-spy-entered-israel/2015/09/25/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: