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April 25, 2014 / 25 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Makor Rishon’

Makor Rishon to Change Owners

Friday, March 28th, 2014

The popular religious-Zionist, Israeli paper Makor Rishon may change owners next week, according to a report in Makor Rishon.

Shlomo Ben-Tzvi is being forced to sell the paper by the court, after debts rang up from the paper’s unfortunate acquisition of the debt-ridden Israeli paper, Ma’ariv.

Twelve groups inquired about acquiring the paper from the court, six groups put in bids, and two bidders are left competing for the final decision.

One of the two final bidders is none other than Sheldon Adelson, who also owns the free Israeli paper, Yisrael Hayom.

The highest bid so far is Adelson’s Yisrael Hayom with NIS 14 million. The Jerusalem Post offered a close bid of NIS 13.5 million.

Makor Rishon was first founded in 1997, and changed owners a few times. The last owner was Shlomo Ben-Tzvi.

For all appearances, it was the purchase of Ma’ariv that set up the chain of events that resulted in the paper being sold.

Makor Rishon For Sale?

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

It appears that Makor Rishon may now be up for sale.

Makor Rishon is a popular Israeli/Hebrew newspaper that caters to the Religious-Zionist market.

Last year, the newspaper’s management purchased the failed newspaper, Maariv, which subsequently turned into a financial black hole that has neen sucking Makor Rishon dry. Agreements connected to the purchase of Maariv linked it to Makor Rishon, which precludes dumping Maariv separately to save Makor Rishon.

Reports say that a third of the employees of Makor Rishon and Maariv were placed on unpaid vacation. Some employees say they haven’t received their February salaries.

Sources say that the goal of the paper’s management appears to be simply keep the paper going, running on a low flame, until a buyer can be found.

The Danny Ayalon Rumor Saga Continues

Friday, December 7th, 2012

With official silence still emanating out of the Yisrael Beytenu party, the rumor mill continues to grind out explanations as to why the popular Deputy Foreign Minister, Danny Ayalon, was removed from his party’s list ahead of the upcoming elections.

According to Friday’s Makor Rishon the reason has to do with a combination of Ayalon’s media savvy, constant interaction with the news media and not always following the party line, or more specifically Liberman’s exact instructions.

Makor Rishon reports that insiders say that there was tension between the two since the beginning of their term together, in part because Ayalon was popular among the foreign press due to his excellent English and personal interaction with them, and in part because of Ayalon’s philosophy that the Foreign Ministry needs to interact a lot with the media in order to get their message across, while Liberman prefers to play his cards close to his chest.

Ayalon is considered one of the cutting edge politicians when it comes to using social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter.

Channel 10 had reported that Ayalon was dropped for leaking information to the press, Makor Rishon seems to confirm that this is what Liberman believed, and that over the past four years, Liberman not only excluded Ayalon from meetings, but also embedded one of his personal spokespersons into Ayalon’s office whom Ayalon believed was there to report on him back to Liberman.

Sources in Yisrael Beytenu said that Ayalon knew for two days that he was probably going to be kicked out, and could have quit on his own respectfully.

Ayalon office says he was only officially informed two hours before the announcement.

 

 

 

Israel Newspaper Staffs Go On Strike

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

Employees of Haaretz have gone on an open-ended strike, while Maariv employees are burning tires outside their office building, due to the anticipated firing of nearly 2000 people in Maariv, as well as anticipated staff staff cutbacks at Haaretz.

This comes in addition, according to a report on Galei Tzahal, of staff firings that have already begun in the recent days at Globes, Yediot, and others.

The strike was timed to coincide with a special Directors meeting at Haaretz.

Some of the striking newspaper staff are demanding that the government bail out the newspapers, because of their “important role in safeguarding Israeli democracy.”

In addition, there are new difficulties in the Makor Rishon acquisition of Maariv.  Maariv may be in more debt than previously disclosed, and it’s sales projections are less than were previously estimated placing the deal in a precarious position. Shlomo Ben-Zvi is reportedly working on renegotiating the deal.

FYI, you will still be able to get your news today from JewishPress.com.

Makor Rishon Buys Maariv

Sunday, September 9th, 2012

As JewishPress.com first reported last Thursday, Shlomo Ben-Zvi, the publisher of the national-religious paper Makor Rishon announced the purchase of the struggling Maariv newspaper on Friday. Maariv is the 3rd largest paper in Israel. It was owned by Nochi Dankner and IDB, and had recently announced it would be going completely digital, except for the weekend editions.

The sale was for NIS 85 million shekels.

Ben-Zvi plans to retain only up 15% of the current Maariv staff, mostly editorial personnel.

Makor Rishon does not own a printing press and outsources its printing, and perhaps surprisingly, Ben-Zvi did not purchase Maariv’s printing press. Leaving open the possibility that Yisrael Hayom may still eventually purchase it.

Ben-Zvi lives in Efrat.

Makor Rishon to Buy Maariv?

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

Globes is reporting that Shlomo Ben-Zvi, one of the owners of the religious Israeli newspaper, Makor Rishon, is in advanced talks with Maariv owner Nochi Dankner to buy the Maariv newspaper.

The report said that Ben-Zvi doesn’t plan to buy the debt of the paper, just the assets, including the Maariv brand name and control.

The deal is estimated in the tens of millions of shekels.

Tunisian Spring Is Turning Into a Jewish Winter

Saturday, September 1st, 2012

Back in December, Tunisia-born Vice Prime Minister of Israel Silvan Shalom called on the Jews still living in Tunisia to immigrate to Israel. That call was rejected with much derision by the remnants of Tunisia’s once thriving Jewish community.

But with new legislation being proposed in the Islamist Ennahda led government, Tunisian Jews may need to rethink their loyalty to a country that no longer wants them.

The Tunisian Parliament is working to pass a law that will prohibit the import of religious books, kosher food, and even visitors from Israel.

The Jews of Tunisia are working to reach a compromise with the government to prevent the parliament from passing the law in a few months time.

In an interview with Makor Rishon, Rav Haim Biton, Chief Rabbi of the Jewish community in Tunisia said, “Today, the government lets us bring in food, medicine, religious and educational books from Israel. If this law passes, our condition will completely change.”

He continued on to say that they are trying to explain to the government that if the law passes, in a few months from now, their relatives from Israel won’t be able to visit, they will not have much needed kosher food items, and, of course, they won’t be able to bring in religious and educational materials.

Other community members were less optimistic as they believe this is the government trying to cut off Jews from their culture. “Behind this law to prohibit the import of kosher products and visiting relatives is their desire to cut off our connection to Israel,” they said.

In November, Tunisia passed a separate law limiting NGOs to importing medicine only from foreign sources in with diplomatic ties with Tunisia, which, obviously, excluded Israel.

Despite the fact that the new proposed law hasn’t yet been passed, Israeli citizens who have requested permission to visit Tunisia recently have been repeatedly turned down, while eight months ago, they could visit.

Tunisia’s Jewish community is divided over the best way to fight the proposed legislation: quietly and behind the scenes, or with public petitions.

The opposition to the petition proposal sees no chance the law will pass, with less than two months before the end of the term of the interim government. They prefer to keep a low profile and to avoid conflicts with the new government.

Tunisia is set to hold elections on October 23rd, assuming they don’t delay them again as they did in July. If this law passes, it will be a clear failure of Tunisia’s fledgling democracy and its ability to protect the basic rights of its minority citizens.

At its peak Tunisia had 110,000 Jews. Fewer than 2000 Jews remain today in one of the Diaspora’s oldest Jewish communities, which some sources say was first settled by Jews around the time the First Temple was destroyed.

Twenty-five hundred years ago, the Levites living in Djerba, Tunisia, didn’t listen to Ezra the Scribe’s call to return to Israel. Maybe this time Tunisia’s Jews should listen to Silvan Shalom.

Is Sheldon Adelson Destroying Israel’s Newspapers?

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

According to the Israeli financial website Globes, Sheldon Adelson is in advanced negotiations to purchase the Ha’aretz printing plant. The deal is believed to be in the order of $25 million dollars.

Over the past few months, Adelson’s free daily, Yisrael Hayom, has been searching for a new printing facility to replace the Ha’aretz plant where it currently prints its daily freesheet. Ha’aretz’s plant handles the printing for a number of different newspapers.

Adelson had recently been in negotiations with Nochi Dankner, a major shareholder and chairman of publicly traded IDB Group, Israel’s largest diversified business group with assets of more than $30 billion, to purchase Ma’ariv’s Levin Epstein Printing House. But that deal apparently fell through, striking a hard blow for Ma’ariv which is desperately strapped for cash. Ma’ariv has been looking to sell the printing plant and the land it sits on.

Many Israeli newspapers have been firing staff and “streamlining” these past few months. The right-wing Makor Rishon is one notable exception to the rule.

Globes reports that Ha’aretz announced it was firing 70 employees, some 32 from their own paper, and the rest from their financial daily, The Marker. Yediot Achronot will be firing dozens, many of them likely to be dropped from its website Ynet. Ma’ariv recently shut down its weekday print run, and fired 30 employees in June.

Yediot executives are blaming Adelson and Yisrael Hayom for destroying the Israeli newspaper industry, and more specifically, for destroying Ha’aretz and Yediot Achronot with the introduction of the free daily broadsheet.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/is-sheldon-adelson-destroying-israels-newspapers/2012/08/14/

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