web analytics
September 25, 2016 / 22 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Dead Sea’

Kuseifa Arab Questioned for Incitement on Facebook

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

An Arab resident of the Bedouin town of Kuseifa was arrested Wednesday afternoon on charges of incitement to violence.

Kuseifa is a 10-minute drive west of the Negev city of Arad along Highway 31, just past the ancient Biblical city of Arad, where tourists can view the archaeological excavation of Tel Arad.

The 20-year-old, an employee at a factory at the Dead Sea in southern Israel, was taken into custody by police in the area, according to the Walla! website.

“The intifada has started, and I am sure that afterwards there will not be one Jewish pig here,” the worker reportedly wrote on his Facebook page.

He was taken for questioning by police to the precinct in Arad.

Kuseifa is comprised of Bedouin and Palestinian Arabs who have intermarried together, most of whom originate from the Hebron area.

Jewish Press Staff

Camel Caravan Stalls Chabad Rabbi at the Dead Sea

Saturday, August 22nd, 2015

Traffic horror stories in Israel are famous, and driving on highways in the Holy Land is reserved only for the brave at heart. It is well known that Chabad-Lubavitch emissaries are among the bravest rabbis in the world, of course.

Last week even Chabad of Dead Sea director Rabbi Shimon Elharar met his match, running into a massive “traffic jam” on the highway alongside the Dead Sea.

“It’s not only in Tel Aviv that one has to worry about getting stuck,” Elharar chuckled in an exclusive interview with JewishPress.com.

“We were driving back from a Bat Mitzvah atop the cliff-top fortress at Masada,” said the rabbi, “and suddenly we found ourselves in the middle of a ‘traffic jam.’”

A massive camel herd simply strolled into the road, right in front of Elharar’s amazed eyes. The rabbi barely had time to hit the brakes, he said.

“God allowed those camels to pass me [on the road],” the emissary said with a laugh.

Elharar typically spends half of his day in his car, visiting Jews at locations from one end of the Dead Sea to the other.

Hana Levi Julian

Weather Forecast: 100 Degrees in Jerusalem

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

It won’t be plain hot on Shabbat. It will be boiling hot.

It gets even worse on Sunday, and a horrid heat wave will stick around for several days. Sunday will be the worst, when temperatures will reach 115 degrees Fahrenheit (47 Celsius) in Eilat, but the rest of the week simply will be a bit “less hot” but not  “cooler.”

Even Jerusalem thermometers will hit 100 degrees (38 Celsius) on Sunday after reaching 95-97 degrees Fahrenheit (35-36 Celsius) on Shabbat.

The central plains, immediately east of the Mediterranean Coast, will be muggy, with the humidity at 70 percent at temperatures in the upper 90s.

Rare summer thunderstorms are expected in the Dead Sea and Eilat areas Sunday afternoon and evening.

Hold tight. Winter is on the way in about three months, and don’t start whining for summer when it snows.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Archaeologists Discover that Ancient Dead Sea Scroll Is Chapter of Leviticus

Monday, July 20th, 2015

Archaeologists have learned a pleasant surprise: One of the ancient Dead Sea Scrolls that never has been understood turns out to be a 1,500-year-old copy of the beginning of the Book of Leviticus (VaYikra).

Modern technologies made it possible for the first time to read the contents of the burnt scroll that was found 45 years ago inside the Holy Ark of the ancient synagogue at Ein Gedi excavations, on the western shore of the Dead Sea.

This is the first time in any archaeological excavation that a Torah scroll was found in a synagogue, particularly inside a Holy Ark.

The extraordinary find, presented at a press conference Monday, was the conclusion of efforts during the last year that brought the Biblical verses back to life after state of the art and advanced technologies preserved and documented the Dead Sea scrolls.

The scroll of the first chapter of Leviticus, was written in Hebrew and was dated by Carbon 14 analysis to the late sixth–century CE, making it the most ancient scroll from the five books of the Hebrew Bible to be found since the Dead Sea scrolls, most of which are ascribed to the end of the Second Temple period (first century BCE-first century CE).

The Israel Antiquities Authority Israel’s Merkel Technologies Company last year cooperated to perform high-resolution 3-D scanning of some Dead Sea Scrolls fragments and phylactery (tefillin) cases by means of a Micro-CT scanner.

The fragment of the Ein Gedi scroll was scanned along with the phylacteries and phylactery cases. The Israel Antiquities Authority then sent the outcome of these scans to University of Kentucky Professor Brent Seales, who developed digital imaging software that allows to virtually unroll the scroll and visualize the text.

This enabled the first eight verses of the Book of Leviticus to suddenly became legible:

The Lord summoned Moses and spoke to him from the tent of meeting, saying:

Speak to the people of Israel and say to them: When any of you bring an offering of livestock to the Lord, you shall bring your offering from the herd or from the flock.

If the offering is a burnt-offering from the herd, you shall offer a male without blemish; you shall bring it to the entrance of the tent of meeting, for acceptance in your behalf before the Lord. You shall lay your hand on the head of the burnt-offering, and it shall be acceptable in your behalf as atonement for you.

The bull shall be slaughtered before the Lord; and Aaron’s sons the priests shall offer the blood, dashing the blood against all sides of the altar that is at the entrance of the tent of meeting. The burnt-offering shall be flayed and cut up into its parts.

The sons of the priest Aaron shall put fire on the altar and arrange wood on the fire. Aaron’s sons the priests shall arrange the parts, with the head and the suet, on the wood that is on the fire on the altar. (Leviticus 1:1-8).

Dr. Sefi Porath, who discovered the scroll in the 1970 Ein Gedi excavations, said, “The deciphering of the scroll, which was a puzzle for us for 45 years, is very exciting. Ein Gedi was a Jewish village in the Byzantine period (fourth–seventh century CE) and had a synagogue with an exquisite mosaic floor and a Holy Ark.

“The settlement was completely burnt to the ground, and none of its inhabitants ever returned to reside there again, or to pick through the ruins in order to salvage valuable property. In the archaeological excavations of the burnt synagogue, we found in addition to the charred scroll fragments, a bronze seven-branched candelabrum (menorah), the community’s money box containing c. 3,500 coins, glass and ceramic oil lamps, and vessels that held perfume.

“We have no information regarding the cause of the fire, but speculation about the destruction ranges from Bedouin raiders from the region east of the Dead Sea to conflicts with the Byzantine government.”

Jewish Press Staff

Update: Armed Terrorist Shot by IDF at Jordan Valley Highway Checkpoint

Friday, June 26th, 2015

Israeli soldiers shot and critically wounded a Palestinian Authority terrorist who shot at them at a Jordan Valley checkpoint several miles south of Beit Shean Friday morning.

The soldiers, Reservists, were not injured. Sappers are checking to determine if the terrorist was carrying explosives.

The terrorist had stopped his car at the checkpoint, got out of the vehicle and then shot at the soldiers as he approached them.

Highway 90, the only north-south road that links the Dead Sea with Beit Shean through the Jordan Valley, has been closed in both directions.

This is the handgun a terrorist used to try to murder Israeli Reservists soldiers Friday morning.

This is the handgun a terrorist used to try to murder Israeli Reservists soldiers Friday morning.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Deadwood at the Dead Sea

Monday, June 8th, 2015

Branches from trees left at the Dead Sea become encrusted with salt. The Dead Sea is beautiful.

Photo of the Day

Chabad of Dead Sea Works a Miracle for Wedding Blessings Before Shavuot

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

This is the story of a miracle granted to a young Israeli couple on the eve of the Jewish holiday of Shavuot, which marks the giving of the Torah to the Jewish People at Mount Sinai, which begins Saturday night at the closing of the Sabbath.

Wednesday night at 8 pm Yonatan from Miami picked up the phone — a chosson (groom) who married two days earlier in Israel and who said he wanted to make sheva brochot, the traditional celebration after a wedding in which seven blessings are recited for a new couple. He and his wife were staying in a hotel at the Dead Sea, he said.

Chabad of Dead Sea carries out a myriad of Torah activities at hotels at Ein Bokek, Masada and elsewhere around the Dead Sea.

Chabad of Dead Sea carries out a myriad of Torah activities at hotels at Ein Bokek, Masada and elsewhere around the Dead Sea.

They had planned that at the end of their meal at the hotel they would simply ask for a minyan of Jews to remain and to recite the seven traditional blessings over a cup of wine, but they discovered to their dismay that it was just their luck that the hotel was hosting a Gentile group, and there were no Jews.

Uh oh. “Now what?” they thought.

True Israelis, they quickly realized there had to be a Chabad House in the area, somewhere.

A quick search on Google sent them to Rabbi Shimon Elharar, Chabad-Lubavitch emissary and director of Chabad of the Dead Sea, whom they called immediately (and who told the story in an exclusive interview with JewishPress.com.)

“Can you make sheva brochot for us? We are here at the Dead Sea,” Yonatan asked.

Within two hours, – by 8 pm – Rabbi Elharar’s wife and co-emissary, Rina Elharar had organized a complete, traditional sheva brochot celebration for the new couple, including food, enough Jewish men for the required quorum of ten for a minyan to recite the seven wedding blessings, and guests to celebrate with both husband and wife.

Not one actually knew the couple prior to the celebration, but it didn’t matter at all. “We all know each other from ancient times,” Elharar told JewishPress.com. “We are all one people, and we all stood as one when the Torah was given to us at Mount Sinai, right? That’s all that really matters when Jews gather together. We are one!”

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/chabad-of-dead-sea-works-a-miracle-for-wedding-blessings-before-shavuot/2015/05/22/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: